Your search found 269 Results

  1. 1
    375555

    Health and status of Palestine refugees from Syria in Jordan: situational analysis. Final report.

    Amin K

    Boston, Massachusetts, John Snow [JSI], 2017 Mar 31. 21 p.

    This document highlights the health and situational status of Palestine refugees from Syria (PRS) now living in Jordan, based on a seven-week assessment visit to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA). The purpose of the assessment was to understand: i) access to maternal health and child health services, as well as treatment and prevention of hypertension and diabetes; ii) access to hospitalization; and, iii) the specific vulnerabilities arising from the current legal, political, and economic status of the PRS to enable UNRWA develop an advocacy strategy. The Palestine refugees from Syria living in Jordan are the most marginalized.The document highlights the focus group methodology used to understand the issues—health, educational, social, livelihoods—that PRS in Jordan face, a profile of participants, key findings and stories from participants. Finally, the recommendations include those on health, education, and microfinance.As the first such qualitative assessment of PRS living in Jordan, the findings will have implications for all those accessing services at health centers, and not just for the PRS. While the focus was intentionally on the health of PRS, the study also sheds light on other aspects of refugee life in Jordan, including children’s education, livelihoods, and the UNRWA assistance program.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    372502

    Engaging men and boys in refugee settings to address sexual and gender based violence.

    Aasheim C; Buscher D; Peacock D; Ngugi L

    Johannesburg, South Africa, Sonke Gender Justice Network, [2008]. 26 p.

    UNHCR has recognized the essential role that both male staff and male persons of concern play in ending gender-based violence in its operations and that protecting women from SGBV is part of the organization’s core protection mandate. This workshop was organized to raise awareness of the need to engage men and boys, to look at successful models for such engagement, and to develop country-level strategies for strengthening the engagement of men and boys to end sexual and gender-based violence. The workshop addressed knowledge, attitudes and action and brought together UNHCR and implementing partner staff as well as refugees from ten African countries including gender practitioners and organizations already engaged in working with men and boys. A four day regional workshop was facilitated by Sonke Gender Justice Network (Sonke) and the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children. (Women’s Commission), in cooperation with UNHCR, to increase and encourage the involvement of men and boys in the work against sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). The participants consisted of multifunctional teams from nine different countries in the Great Lakes region, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa (Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Rwanda), a professor from St Cloud’s University and the founder of MAGE in Sierra Leone. The workshop had three main objectives; a) Awareness raising for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on addressing masculinities. b) Skills building for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on how to integrate masculinities into programs to address SGBV and promote gender equality. c) Development of a critical mass of trainers to undertake training on masculinities throughout the region. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    337482

    Women and girls safe spaces. A guidance note based on lessons learned from the Syrian crisis

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [New York, New York], UNFPA, 2015. [32] p.

    The creation of women and girls safe spaces has emerged as a key strategy for the protection and empowerment of women and girls affected by the Syrian crisis. This document provides an overview of what safe spaces are, and what key principles should be followed when establishing such spaces in humanitarian and post-crisis contexts. This guidance is based on the experiences of UNFPA and its partners in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. It also refers to experiences documented by the Gender-Based Violence coordination mechanisms in Jordan and Lebanon. Lessons learned from other regions are also referenced. Guidance has also been taken from the child protection and adolescent girls sectors in establishing child-friendly spaces and girls’ safe spaces.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    336186

    Refugee Protection Meets Migration Management: UNHCR as a Global Police of Populations.

    Scheel S; Ratfisch P

    Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 2014 Jun; 40(6):924-941.

    This article investigates the complex relationship between the practices of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in the field of refugee protection and the more recent political rationality of 'migration management' by drawing from governmentality studies. It is argued that the dissemination of UNHCR's own refugee protection discourse creates certain 'figures of migration' allowing for justifying the build-up and perfection of border controls, which in turn enable any attempt to 'manage' migration in the first place. Conversely, the problematisation of population movements as 'mixed migration flows' allows UNHCR to enlarge its field of activitiy despite its narrow mandate by actively participating in the promotion, planning and implementation of migration management systems. Based on ethnographic research in Turkey and Morocco, this article demonstrates, furthermore, that UNHCR's refugee protection discourse and the emerging migration management paradigm are both based on a methodological nationalism, share an authoritarian potential and yield de-politicising effects. What UNHCR's recent embracing of the migration management paradigm together with its active involvement in respective practices then brings to the fore is that UNHCR is part of a global police of populations.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    335017

    Displacement: the new 21st century challenge. UNHCR global trends 2012.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2013 Jun 19. [48] p.

    UNHCR's annual Global Trends report, released today, covers displacement that occurred during 2012 based on data from governments, NGO partners, and the UN refugee agency itself. The report shows that as of the end of 2012, more than 45.2 million people were in situations of displacement compared to 42.5 million at the end of 2011. This includes 15.4 million refugees, 937,000 asylum seekers, and 28.8 million people forced to flee within the borders of their own countries. The report does not include the rise in those forced from their homes in Syria during the current year. War remains the dominant cause. A full 55 percent of all refugees listed in UNHCR's report come from just five war-affected countries: Afghanistan, Somalia, Iraq, Syria and Sudan. The report also charts major new displacement from Mali, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and from Sudan into South Sudan and Ethiopia.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    333217

    Inter-agency field manual on reproductive health in humanitarian settings. 2010 revision for field review.

    Inter-agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises

    [New York, New York]. Inter-agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises, 2010. [222] p.

    The 2010 Inter-agency Field Manual on Reproductive Health in Humanitarian Settings is an update of the 1999 Reproductive Health in Refugee Situations: An Inter-agency Field Manual, the authoritative guidance on reproductive health interventions in humanitarian settings. The 2010 version provides additional guidance on how to implement the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Reproductive Health, a minimum standard of care in humanitarian response. It also splits the original chapter on HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) into two separate chapters to accommodate new guidance on HIV programming. A new chapter on Comprehensive Abortion Care has been developed to cover more than post-abortion care. The chapters on Program Design, Monitoring and Evaluation and Adolescent Reproductive Health have been placed earlier in the manual to address the cross-cutting nature of these topics. Information on human rights and legal considerations has been integrated into each of the thematic chapters to ensure that program staff can address rights-related concerns. The updated information is based on normative technical guidance of the World Health Organization. It also reflects the good practices documented in crisis settings around the world since the initial field-test version was released in 1996. The latest edition reflects the wide application of the Field Manual's principles and technical content beyond refugee situations, extending its use into diverse crises, including conflict zones and natural disasters.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    342498

    Saving women's lives in refugee and other crisis situations. Manual vacuum aspiration.

    Ipas

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Ipas, 2008. 4 p.

    The United Nations Population Fund estimates that 25-50 percent of maternal deaths in refugee settings are attributable to unsafe abortions. Making pregnancy safer includes timely and appropriate management of unsafe and spontaneous abortion for all women, and the provision of or referral for safe abortion services to the full extent allowed by law. Manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) has been used worldwide for more than three decades, enabling millions of women in developed and developing countries to undergo safe and effective uterine evacuation for treatment of incomplete abortion and first-trimester abortion, as well as endometrial biopsy. This brochure highlights how MVA is an important part of safe, effective abortion and postabortion care in conflict settings.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    329087

    Guidance on infant feeding and HIV in the context of refugees and displaced populations.

    Lhotska L; McGrath M

    Geneva, Switzerland, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR], 2008 Apr. 20 p.

    This Guidance on Infant feeding and HIV aims to assist UNHCR, its implementing and operational partners, and governments on policies and decision- making strategies on infant feeding and HIV in refugees and displaced populations. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the current technical and programmatic consensus on infant feeding and HIV, and give guidance to facilitate elective implementation of HIV and infant feeding programmes in refugee and displaced situations, in emergency contexts, and as an integral element of coordinated approach to public health, HIV and nutrition programming. The goal of this guidance is to provide tools to prevent malnutrition, improve the nutritional status of infants and young children, to reduce the transmission of HIV infection from mother to child after delivery, and to increase HIV-free survival of infants.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    329553

    HIV interventions for young people in humanitarian emergencies.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    This Brief has been developed by the Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, development partners, civil society and other implementing partners on effective HIV interventions for young people in humanitarian emergencies. It is part of a series of seven global Guidance Briefs that focus on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support interventions for young people that can be delivered through different settings and for a range of target groups.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    327185
    Peer Reviewed

    Reproductive health: a right for refugees and internally displaced persons.

    Austin J; Guy S; Lee-Jones L; McGinn T; Schlecht J

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2008 May; 16(31):10-21.

    Continued political and civil unrest in low-resource countries underscores the ongoing need for specialised reproductive health services for displaced people. Displaced women particularly face high maternal mortality, unmet need for family planning, complications following unsafe abortion, and gender-based violence, as well as sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. Relief and development agencies and UN bodies have developed technical materials, made positive policy changes specific to crisis settings and are working to provide better reproductive health care. Substantial gaps remain, however. The collaboration within the field of reproductive health in crises is notable, with many agencies working in one or more networks. The five-year RAISE Initiative brings together major UN and NGO agencies from the fields of relief and development, and builds on their experience to support reproductive health service delivery, advocacy, clinical training and research. The readiness to use common guidance documents, develop priorities jointly and share resources has led to smoother operations and less overlap than if each agency worked independently. Trends in the field, including greater focus on internally displaced persons and those living in non-camp settings, as well as refugees in camps, the protracted nature of emergencies, and an increasing need for empirical evidence, will influence future progress. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    327186
    Peer Reviewed

    Legal aspects of conflict-induced migration by women.

    Macklin A

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2008 May; 16(31):22-32.

    This paper surveys the international legal frameworks, including the many guidelines, handbooks, resolutions, toolkits, conclusions and manuals produced by various United Nations bodies, that confirm an awareness of the protection issues specific to women and girls displaced by conflict. It explores the extent to which these documents address the gendered impacts of conflict-induced migration, and the role of United Nations bodies as international governmental organisations in implementing these norms. The main focus is upon internally displaced women and women refugees. In addition to problems of enforcing compliance with existing guidelines, the paper concludes that two areas - developing strategies to accommodate the realities of long-term, even permanent displacement and enhancing women's literal and legal literacy - require much greater attention on the part of governmental and non-governmental international organisations. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    325644

    Situation of human rights in Afghanistan. Commission on Human Rights resolution 2003/77.

    United Nations. Commission on Human Rights

    [Geneva, Switzerland], United Nations, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2003. 4 p. (E/CN.4/RES/2003/77)

    Guided by the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenants on Human Rights and accepted humanitarian rules, as set forth in the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 and the Additional Protocols thereto. Reaffirming that all Member States have an obligation to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms and to fulfil the obligations they have freely undertaken under the various international instruments. Recalling that Afghanistan is a party to several international human rights instruments and has obligations to report on their implementation. Recalling also the relevant resolutions and decisions of the Commission on Human Rights, the relevant resolutions and presidential statements of the Security Council, the reports of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict (S/2002/1299) and on women, peace and security (S/2002/1154) and the most recent resolution adopted by the Commission on the Status of Women. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    323551

    The Cluster Approach in northern Uganda.

    Huber J; Birkeland NM

    Forced Migration Review. 2007 Dec; (29):72.

    The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) strongly believes that the Cluster Approach holds promise for improving the international response to internal displacement. The approach represents a serious attempt by the UN, NGOs, international organisations and governments to address critical gaps in the humanitarian system. We want this reform effort to succeed and to play an active role in northern Uganda to support the work of the clusters and improve their effectiveness. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    323407
    Peer Reviewed

    Sexual violence increasing in Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Wakabi W

    Lancet. 2008 Jan; 371(9605):15-16.

    As fighting flares up in the Democratic Republic of Congo, health workers are reporting a rise in brutal sexual violence against women. But, says Wairagala Wakabi, the international community continues to pay only lip service to the crisis in the central African country. Medical workers are concerned about rising incidents of sexual brutality against women in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which are resulting in mounting rates of trauma, fistula, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Although cases of sexual violence against women have been widespread in eastern DRC over the past decade, humanitarian workers say rape is becoming more violent and more common, yet the world continues to pay only lip service to the crisis in the central African country. Reports of gang rapes, sexual slavery, purposeful mutilation of women's genitalia, and killings of rape victims are commonplace in eastern Congo, especially in the north Kivu province, where fighting has subsisted for years. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    322951
    Peer Reviewed

    Meeting the health needs of Iraqi refugees in Jordan.

    Devi S

    Lancet. 2007 Dec 1; 370(9602):1815-1816.

    Over 2 million Iraqis have fled from violence in Iraq to neighbouring countries such as Jordan and Syria. But, unable to cope with the influx of refugees and their health and humanitarian needs, these countries are making entry more restrictive. 7-year-old Mohammad sat up in his hospital bed in Amman, Jordan, half his face concealed by thick, white bandages, as his father Salman recounted their tale. In October last year, the family was receiving condolences at a traditional mourning tent outside their Baghdad home for Salman's father, who was killed in sectarian violence because of his past job as an army officer under Saddam Hussein. As the mourners congregated, a car bomb exploded at the nearby market, prompting the panicked family to flee in all directions. Salman's experience as a policeman made him shout out warnings to people nearby but to no avail as a second bomb detonated soon afterwards. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    322911
    Peer Reviewed

    Conceptualizing discourses on environmental refugees at the United Nations.

    McNamara KE

    Population and Environment. 2007 Sep; 29(1):12-24.

    This paper conceptualizes the absence of multilateral protection for environmental refugees. It does this by critically scrutinizing interviews conducted with United Nations ambassadors and senior diplomats in 2004 (n = 45) in a number of key policy-making locations. These interviews reveal that an absence of policy on environmental refugees has been reproduced by discursive politics at the United Nations. The reasons for which are explored here in this paper, and include shifting attitudes towards the role of multilateralism and environmental issues generally. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    321266

    State of world population 2006. A passage to hope: women and international migration.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2006. [111] p.

    Today, women constitute almost half of all international migrants worldwide - 95 million. Yet, despite contributions to poverty reduction and struggling economies, it is only recently that the international community has begun to grasp the significance of what migrant women have to offer. And it is only recently that policymakers are acknowledging the particular challenges and risks women confront when venturing into new lands. Every year millions of women working millions of jobs overseas send hundreds of millions of dollars in remittance funds back to their homes and communities. These funds go to fill hungry bellies, clothe and educate children, provide health care and generally improve living standards for loved ones left behind. For host countries, the labour of migrant women is so embedded into the very fabric of society that it goes virtually unnoticed. Migrant women toil in the households of working families, soothe the sick and comfort the elderly. They contribute their technical and professional expertise, pay taxes and quietly support a quality of life that many take for granted. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    320366

    European Union. Managing migration means potential EU complicity in neighboring states' abuse of migrants and refugees.

    Human Rights Watch

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2006 Oct. 22 p. (Human Rights Watch No. 2)

    Irregular migration into the European Union (EU) poses clear challenges for European governments. Few would question the urgent need for policies to address these challenges. However, the common EU policy in this area is primarily focussed on keeping migrants and asylum seekers out of and away from Europe. The rights of migrants and refugee protection are marginalized. This briefing paper summarizes recent trends in the EU's approach. Through case studies of conditions in, and EU policies toward, Ukraine and Libya, it critiques current EU "externalization" practices. After noting some hopeful signs toward enhanced protection for asylum seekers and migrants, it concludes with recommendations to the EU and its member states. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    320248

    State of anarchy. Rebellion and abuses against civilians.

    Bouckaert P; Bercault O

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2007 Sep. 108 p. (Human Rights Watch Vol 19, No. 14(A))

    Since mid-2005, hundreds of civilians have been killed, more than 10 thousand houses burned, and approximately 212,000 persons have fled their homes in terror to live in desperate conditions deep in the bush in northern Central African Republic (CAR). Bordering eastern Chad and war-ravaged Darfur in Sudan, this area has been destabilized by at least two major rebellions against the government of President Francois Bozize. The vast majority of summary executions and unlawful killings, and almost all village burnings, have been carried out by government forces, often in reprisal for rebel attacks. While both main rebel groups have been responsible for widespread looting and the forced taxation of the civilian population in areas they control - and rebels in the northeast have committed killings, beatings, and rape - their abuses pale in comparison to those of the Central African Armed Forces (Forces armees Centrafricaines, FACA) and the elite Presidential Guard (Garde presidentielle, GP). As the International Criminal Court (ICC) begins investigations into atrocities committed during the 2002-2003 rebellion against former President Patasse, it should also investigate possible war crimes under its jurisdiction committed in the current round of fighting. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    319563

    Right to education during displacement: a resource for organizations working with refugees and internally displaced persons.

    Robinson JP

    New York, New York, Women' s Commission for Refugee Women and Children, 2006. [50] p.

    This resource is the first in a series of tools that identifies everyone's right to education, with a focus on refugees, returnees and internally displaced persons (IDP). This version is designed for use by local, regional and international organizations, United Nations (UN) agencies, government agencies and education personnel working with displaced communities. Is it mean to serve as: an awareness raising tool to encourage humanitarian assistance agencies to implement education programs - and donors to found them; training and capacity-building resource for practitioners and others working with displaced populations on international rights around education; and a call to action for organizations and individuals to promote access and completion of quality education for all persons affected by emergencies. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    315125

    Africa on the edge. The human toll has been appalling, but is the light at the end of the tunnel a little brighter?

    Wilkinson R

    Refugees Magazine. 2003 Jun; (131):[13] p..

    In an era of short wars, 'controlled' numbers of casualties and sanitized images such as those emerging from Iraq, events in Africa seem almost incomprehensible. Deep in the heart of the Congo basin, some three million people, perhaps many more, perished during an ongoing war described as the deadliest documented conflict in Africa's history. And even as American marines mopped up last pockets of resistance in Baghdad in the full glare of thousands of television cameras, hundreds of people were being slaughtered almost unnoticed in the latest atrocity in one remote corner of the Congo region. During the course of the conflict which began in 1998 and which at times involved six armies from surrounding countries, countless militias and homegrown gangs of thugs, 2.5 million people were ripped from their homes and forced to seek shelter in steaming rain forests and neighbouring states. Angola suffered a similar fate. In a civil war lasting almost three decades, an estimated one million people were killed, and anywhere from three to five million were again uprooted from their ancestral villages and towns. They trudged across a destroyed landscape from one temporary sanctuary to another, often forced to eat berries and roots to survive and in constant danger of being killed or maimed, not only by the combatants, but also from millions of mines which made one of the continent's richest countries a vast and deadly booby trap. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    313353
    Peer Reviewed

    Operational implications of using 2006 World Health Organization growth standards in nutrition programmes: Secondary data analysis.

    Seal A; Kerac M

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2007 Feb 23; 334(7596):733-738.

    The objective was to assess the implications of adopting the World Health Organization 2006 growth standards in combination with current diagnostic criteria in emergency and non-emergency child feeding programmes. Secondary analysis of data from three standardised nutrition surveys (n=2555) for prevalence of acute malnutrition, using weight for height z score (<-2 and <-3) and percentage of the median (<80% and <70%) cut-offs for moderate and severe acute malnutrition from the National Center for Health Statistics/WHO growth reference (NCHS reference) and the new WHO 2006 growth standards (WHO standards). Setting: Refugee camps in Algeria, Kenya, and Bangladesh. Population: Children aged 6-59 months. Important differences exist in the weight for height cut-offs used for defining acute malnutrition obtained from the WHO standards and NCHS reference data. These vary according to a child's height and according to whether z score or percentage of the median cut-offs are used. If applied and used according to current practice in nutrition programmes, the WHO standards will result in a higher measured prevalence of severe acute malnutrition during surveys but, paradoxically, a decrease in the admission of children to emergency feeding programmes and earlier discharge of recovering patients. The expected impact on case fatality rates of applying the new standards in conjunction with current diagnostic criteria is unknown. A full assessment of the appropriate use of the new WHO standards in the diagnosis of acute malnutrition is urgently needed. This should be completed before the standards are adopted by organisations that run nutrition programmes targeting acute malnutrition. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    314640

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 3. Regional instruments: Africa, Middle East, Asia, Americas. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [385] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    314639

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 1. International instruments: UNHCR, refugees and asylum, statelessness, internally displaced persons, migrants, human rights. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [585] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    314638

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 2. International instruments: international humanitarian law, international criminal law, international maritime and aviation law, miscellaneous. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [415] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.

Pages