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    765514

    Techniques of male sterilization.

    MORRIS N; ARTHURE H

    In: Morris, N. and Arthure, H. Sterilization as a means of birth control in men and women. London, Peter Owen, 1976. p. 80-100

    Vasectomy was 1st used at the start of the 20th century and became prominent in the 1950s in family planning programs in Asian countries. The secondary sex characteristics do not change after vasectomy, and there is normal erectile power, libido, orgasm, and ejaculatory volume. Spermatogenesis continues normally in men following vasectomy, and plasma testosterone levels remain unchanged. Vasectomy involves cutting both vasa deferentes through an incision in the scrotum which is usually performed with local anesthesia without hospitalization. Preliminary counseling is necessary so that both partners understand the nature and effects of the operation. Semen banks may be used when available for men undergoing vasectomy. There is no evidence for the greater efficiency of 1 technique over the other. Patients must submit sperm samples for examination after 8-12 weeks and then every 4 weeks until 2 consecutive specimens are negative. Possible complications include: 1) a vasovagal reaction; 2) skin discoloration; 3) edema of the scrotal skin, 4) postoperative pain, 5) infection; 6) ulceration and gangrene of the scrotal skin, and 7) hydrocele or epididymo-orchitis. Successful reanastamosis of the vas deferens with reappearance of sperm can be accomplished in 50-80% of the patients, and the semen is not of quality to insure impregnation in 1/4 of these cases.
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