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  1. 1
    378771

    [Quality of life and its related factors among HIV/AIDS patients from HIV serodiscordant couples in Zhoukou of Henan province].

    Ma LP; Xu P; Sun DY; Li N; Yang WJ; Zhang L; Bai YJ; Ju LH; He HJ; Chen WY; Lyu P

    Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine]. 2016 Apr; 50(4):339-45.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the quality of life and its related factors among HIV/AIDS patients from HIV serodiscordant couples in Zhoukou city of Henan province. METHODS: During January to May in 2015, by the convenience sample, World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire for Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF) (Chinese version) and a self-edited questionnaire were used to investigate 1 251 HIV/AIDS patients who were confirmed with HIV positive by local CDC, registered in"HIV serodiscordant family" and agreed to participate in a face-to-face interview with above 18 year-old based on the local CDC , township hospitals and village clinics of 9 counties and 1 district of Zhoukou city, excluding the HIV/AIDS patients who were in divorce, death by one side, unknowing about his HIV status, with mental illness and disturbance of consciousness, incorrectly understanding the content of the questionnaire, and reluctant to participate in this study. The scores of quality of life of physical, psychological, social relations, and environmental domain were calculated. The related factors of the scores of different domains were analyzed by Multiple Two Classification Unconditioned Logistic Regression. RESULTS: The scores of investigation objects in the physical, psychological, social relations, and environmental domain were 12.00+/- 2.02, 12.07 +/- 2.07, 11.87 +/- 1.99, and 11.09 +/- 1.84, respectively. The multiple Unconditioned Logistic Regression analysis indicated that age <40 years, on ART and no other sickness in last two weeks were beneficial factors associated with physical domain with OR (95%CI): 0.61 (0.35-1.06), 0.52 (0.30-0.90), and 1.66 (1.09-2.52), respectively. The possibility of no poverty and no other sickness in last two weeks increased to 0.15(0.09-0.26) and 1.57(1.06-2.33) times of those who was in poverty and with other sickness in last two weeks in physical domain. The possibility of participants who were below 40 years old and with children increased to 0.58 (0.34-0.98) and 0.37 (0.23-0.57) times of who were above 40 years old and without children in psychological domain. The factors of with AIDS related symptoms, no children and with other sickness in last two week were found to be significantly associated with environmental domain with OR (95%CI): 0.65 (0.48-0.88), 0.66 (0.51-0.85), and 0.65 (0.51-0.84), respectively . CONCLUSION: The scores of every domain of quality of life in HIV serodiscordant couples of Zhoukou city were good. Age, whether having AIDS related symptoms, whether to accept ART , children, status of poverty, and whether suffering from other diseases in last two weeks were the main factors associated with the quality of life.
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  2. 2
    341363
    Peer Reviewed

    Health-related quality of life in patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Nojomi M; Anbary K; Ranjbar M

    Archives of Iranian Medicine. 2008 Nov; 11(6):608-12.

    BACKGROUND: The present study was conducted to determine the health-related quality of life in patients living with human immunodeficiency virus or suffering from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), referred to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center in west of Tehran, Iran. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted using a convenience sampling method on 139 patients living with HIV or suffering from AIDS at the first half of the year 2006. The method of data collection was summarized questionnaire of World Health Organization (WHO-QOL-Brief). The main measured outcome in this study was quality of life and some related demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS: The majority of the patients were males (88.5%) with secondary education (45.3%) and married (27.3%); the majority of them were unemployed (65.4%). The mean+/-SD age of the patients was 35.4+/-6.4 years. Gender, marital status, level of education, CD4+ count, and clinical stage of the disease, had a significant effect on the quality of life of the patients. In multivariate analysis, the most important predictor of the quality of life was clinical stage of the disease. CONCLUSION: The most important factors, association with decreased quality of life of the patients in this study, were being female, separated or divorced, having less CD4+ count, and being at severe stage of the disease.
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  3. 3
    341055
    Peer Reviewed

    HIV-related lipodystrophy in Africa and Asia.

    Womack J

    AIDS Reader. 2009 Apr; 19(4):131-9, 148-52.

    This article reviews the medical literature for information about lipodystrophy in Africa and Asia. These 2 regions were selected because both are of particular interest to the declaration for universal access. Africa represents the epidemic's epicenter. Asia, especially India and China, will soon have HIV / AIDS prevalence rates that will outstrip those seen in the rest of the world combined. The methodology is summarized first: how articles were selected, the inclusion and exclusion criteria used, and how information was synthesized. The results and discussion focus on 3 specific areas: how lipodystrophy is defined and measured, the study populations, and the persons excluded from these studies. A summary of what is and what is not yet known about lipodystrophy in Africa and Asia is also included.
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  4. 4
    341012

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and HIV/AIDS [editorial]

    McMillan AS; Simkiss D

    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 2009 Apr; 55(2):71-2.

    The authors provide recommendations to promote children's right to life and survival, children's best interests and children's participation and non-discrimination through sex education. They also outline ideas that may be developed on the issues for children orphaned by HIV to promote the child's right to life.
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  5. 5
    325554
    Peer Reviewed

    Healthy aging in cities.

    Quinn A

    Journal of Urban Health. 2008 Mar; 85(2):151-153.

    In the coming decades, the global population will urbanize and age at high rates. Today, half of the world's populations lives in cities.1 By 2030, that proportion will rise to 60%, and urbanization will occur most greatly in developing countries. At the same time, the world's population aged 60 and over will double from 11% to 22% by 2050, and that growth will be concentrated in urban areas in less developed countries. All of these trends challenge public health workers, doctors, researchers, and urban planners to ensure healthy livable cities for older people. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    322911
    Peer Reviewed

    Conceptualizing discourses on environmental refugees at the United Nations.

    McNamara KE

    Population and Environment. 2007 Sep; 29(1):12-24.

    This paper conceptualizes the absence of multilateral protection for environmental refugees. It does this by critically scrutinizing interviews conducted with United Nations ambassadors and senior diplomats in 2004 (n = 45) in a number of key policy-making locations. These interviews reveal that an absence of policy on environmental refugees has been reproduced by discursive politics at the United Nations. The reasons for which are explored here in this paper, and include shifting attitudes towards the role of multilateralism and environmental issues generally. (author's)
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  7. 7
    313945
    Peer Reviewed

    Quality of life of women with gynecologic cancer: Associated factors.

    Vaz AF; Pinto-Neto AM; Conde DM; Costa-Paiv L; Morais SS

    Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2007 Dec; 276(6):583-589.

    The objective was to evaluate quality of life (QOL) and identify its associated factors in a cohort of women with gynecologic cancer. A cross-sectional study was conducted, including 103 women with cervical or endometrial cancer, aged between 18 and 75 years who were receiving their entire treatment at the institution where the investigation was carried out. QOL was measured by the World Health Organization's QOL instrument-abbreviated version (WHOQOL-BREF). Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, in addition to prevalence of cancer-related symptoms prior to radiotherapy were investigated. Bivariate analysis was performed, applying the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with QOL. The mean age of the participants was 56.8 plus or minus 11.6 years. The study included 67 (65%) women with cervical cancer and 36 (35%) women with endometrial cancer. Most participants were at an advanced stage (63.1%). The most common complaints were pain (49.5%) and vaginal bleeding (36.9%). The prevalence of anemia was 22.3%. On multivariate analysis, it was observed that anemia (P = 0.006) and nausea and/or vomiting (P = 0.010) determined impairment in physical domain. Pain negatively influenced physical domain (P = 0.001), overall QOL (P = 0.024), and general health (P = 0.013), while the history of surgery positively affected general health (P = 0.001). Cancer-related symptoms were factors that most interfered with QOL in women with gynecologic cancer. Therefore, more attention should be focused on identifying these symptoms, adopting measures to minimize their repercussions on QOL. (author's)
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  8. 8
    320998

    Effects of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccination. Authors' reply [letter]

    Ault K; Insinga R; Haupt R; Lupinacci L; Barr E

    Lancet. 2007 Sep 22; 370(9592):1032-1033.

    Cost-effectiveness analysis, as referenced by Davide Mauri and Nikolaos Polyzos, constitutes one of several sources of information considered by policymakers in developing and developed worlds in making decisions about the optimum efficient use of health-care resources. The WHO Commission on Macroeconomics and Health has suggested that interventions costing less than three times a country's per capita gross domestic product per disability-adjusted life year gained can be regarded as good value, and analysts have equivalently applied this threshold to analyses that use quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Preliminary results from a cost-effectiveness analysis of vaccination with quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine in Mexico suggest a cost/QALY ratio well below this threshold in that country. Previous analyses in developed world settings have consistently shown that vaccination of girls and young women has a cost-effectiveness ratio within the range typically regarded as cost-effective. In countrieswith the fewest resources, direct assistance and public-private partnerships can help deliver needed medicines to the population at or below development costs-eg, the ivermectin donation for river blindness. Marc Arbyn states that if the cases of vaccine-type-related disease are subtracted from disease due to all types, there are a larger number of cases in women who received vaccine than in those who received placebo. This subtraction assumes that the subset of disease cases due to vaccine HPV types and the subset of cases due to non-vaccine HPV types are mutually exclusive, which is not the case. Coinfections with vaccine and non-vaccine types are common. In the presence of coinfection, the effect of such a subtraction is to ignore the presence of non-vaccine HPV types in disease where a vaccine-type HPV has also been detected. The effect of the subtraction is to preferentially attribute co-infected disease cases only to the vaccine HPV types. Individuals in the placebo group are more likely to have their non-vaccine type-related disease discounted in this way. Owing to the high efficacy of the vaccine, individuals in the vaccine group have less vaccine-type-related disease, and so those in the vaccine group have fewer such coinfection cases. To illustrate this point, an analysis of the numbers of individuals with disease due to vaccine and non-vaccine HPV types in the intention-to-treat population of protocols 013 and 015 is presented in the figure. The parts shaded blue would be the result of subtraction, similar to Arbyn's subtraction. However, the total numbers of cases of disease related to non-vaccine HPV types are 226+56=282 cases in the vaccine group and 193+106=299 cases in the placebo group. There is not an excess of cases caused by non-vaccine HPV types in the vaccine group. (full text)
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  9. 9
    312814

    Brazilian psychosocial and operational research vis-a-vis the UNGASS targets.

    Bastos FI; Hacker MA

    Revista de Saude Publica / Journal of Public Health. 2006 Apr; 40 Suppl:42-51.

    Items from the UNGASS Draft Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS (2001) are analyzed. The Brazilian experience of new methods for testing and counseling among vulnerable populations, preventive methods controlled by women, prevention, psychosocial support for people living with HIV/AIDS, and mother-child transmission, is discussed. These items were put into operation in the form of keywords, in systematic searches within the standard biomedicine databases, also including the subdivisions of the Web of Science relating to natural and social sciences. The Brazilian experience relating to testing and counseling strategies has been consolidated through the utilization of algorithms aimed at estimating incidence rates and identifying recently infected individuals, testing and counseling for pregnant women, and application of quick tests. The introduction of alternative methods and new technologies for collecting data from vulnerable populations has been allowing speedy monitoring of the epidemic. Psychosocial support assessments for people living with HIV/AIDS have gained impetus in Brazil, probably as a result of increased survival and quality of life among these individuals. Substantial advances in controlling mother-child transmission have been observed. This is one of the most important victories within the field of HIV/ AIDS in Brazil, but deficiencies in prenatal care still constitute a challenge. With regard to prevention methods for women, Brazil has only shown a shy response. Widespread implementation of new technologies for data gathering and management depends on investments in infrastructure and professional skills acquisition. (author's)
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  10. 10
    312055

    Supportive and palliative care for people living with HIV / AIDS.

    Schietinger H

    CommonHealth. 2005 Spring; 36-43.

    As defined by the World Health Organization (WHO):2 Palliative medicine is the study and management of patients with active, progressive, far advanced disease for whom the prognosis is limited and the focus of care is the quality of life. [It is] the active total care of patients whose disease is not responsive to curative treatment. Control of pain, of other symptoms, and of psychological, social, and spiritual problems, is paramount. The goal of palliative care is achievement of the best quality of life for patients and their families. Many aspects of palliative care are applicable earlier in the course of the illness, in conjunction with treatment. Palliative care: Affirms life and regards dying as a normal process; Neither hastens, nor postpones, death; Provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; Integrates the psychological and spiritual aspects of patient care; Offers a support system to help patients live as actively as possible until death; and Offers a support system to help families cope during a patient's illness and with their own bereavement. In short, palliative care comprehensively addresses the physical, emotional, and spiritual impact a life-threatening illness has on a person, no matter the stage of the illness. It places the sick person and his/her family, however defined, at the center of care and aggressively addresses all of the symptoms and problems experienced by them. Many healthcare providers apply certain elements of the palliative care treatment approach-- such as comprehensive care and aggressive symptom management-- to the care of all of their patients, not only those who are terminally ill, offering the type of care we would all like to receive when we are sick. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    303737

    Supporting national HIV / AIDS responses: an implementation approach. The answer lies within.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Development Policy. HIV / AIDS Group

    New York, New York, UNDP, Bureau for Development Policy, HIV / AIDS Group, 2004. 32 p.

    HIV/AIDS multi-sectoral strategic planning has been promoted and successfully undertaken in a number of countries. In most cases, the planning process results in the design and completion of national strategic frameworks (NSF) or plans. While such frameworks continue to provide valuable strategic orientation, they have often not served the intended purpose of guiding successful and well-coordinated implementation at national, provincial, regional, district, constituency and community levels. To date, the transformation of strategic frameworks into effective and coordinated action remains a major concern for most governments and their partners. The broad diversity of actors, the numerous sectors involved and the variety of components of the response illustrate the complexity of implementation and coordination. To achieve a strategic multi-sectoral response, it is important to develop a strategic framework and management approach consistent with national policies, priorities and local experiences. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    303029

    AIDS: palliative care. UNAIDS technical update.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2000 Oct. 16 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Technical Update)

    Palliative care aims to achieve the best quality of life for patients (and their families) suffering from life-threatening and incurable illness, including HIV/AIDS. Crucial elements are the relief of all pain- physical, psychological, spiritual and social and enabling and supporting caregivers to work through their own emotions and grief. Palliative care has relieved the intense, broad suffering of people living with HIV/AIDS but the latter brings a number of challenges to its philosophy and practice including: The complex disease process with its unpredictable course and wide range of complications, which means that palliative care has to balance acute treatment with the control of chronic symptoms; Complex treatments which can overstretch health services; The stigmatization and discrimination faced by most people living with HIV/AIDS; Complex family issues, such as infection of both partners; Role reversal in families, such as young children looking after their parents; Burdens on health care workers. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    282826

    The migration of skilled health personnel in the Pacific Region: a summary report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2004. [105] p.

    The initial part of this report reviews the available literature and the surveys of health worker (and other skilled) migration in the Pacific region. This is linked to an examination of recent changes in the stock of health workers in PICs, with particular reference to emigration and immigration, and the impact of these changes on health care provision. The second part of the report reviews the data derived from surveys undertaken in a number of PICs and destination nations, on potential and actual migrants, presently or formerly employed in health care, that focus on the rationale and context for out-migration, and the potential for return migration (of SHPs currently overseas). This is linked to studies of immigrant SHPs in PICs, to examine their migration and employment history and their contribution to the maintenance and improvement of health care in the region. Finally this is reviewed in the context of existing policies that seek to influence the retention, and appropriate allocation of health workers, in PICs, and the potential for developing more effective policies. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    282160

    Ageing and health: a health promotion approach for developing countries.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, [2003]. 71 p.

    The purpose of this publication is to outline ways of responding to the health needs of ageing populations in developing countries. It focuses on the Western Pacific Region of the World Health Organization (WHO). The aims of the paper are essentially practical in that it seeks to provide health workers with a framework for selecting appropriate ways of approaching the tasks of improving quality of life, disease prevention and health services delivery for older people. Populations in all countries of the Western Pacific Region are ageing – an increasing proportion of people are aged 65 and over. This, together with changing lifestyles, means that there has been a radical shift in the types of health problems facing health workers in developing countries. Increasingly, health policies and programmes will have to address the demands posed by the rapidly emerging epidemic in chronic, noncommunicable, lifestyle-based diseases and disabilities. While these diseases present a challenge for health policy for people at all stages of the life course, they are particularly evident among older people where their impact is more obvious. The growing proportion of elderly people among the population simply highlights the importance of addressing these health problems. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    281998

    Quality education and HIV / AIDS.

    Pigozzi MJ

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2004. 30 p.

    This paper uses a framework for quality education developed by UNESCO’s Education Sector, Division for the Promotion of Quality Education (ED/PEQ) to show how education systems can and must change in their analysis and conduct in relation to HIV/AIDS. It summarises the 10 dimensions of the framework, considers how HIV/AIDS manifests itself in relation to these quality dimensions and summarises some practical applications of how education has responded and can respond to the pandemic from a quality perspective. A more detailed annex to the paper provides evidence on the manifestations of the pandemic on education systems, and how systems have responded in practical ways. Some general conclusions are drawn and a final section promotes some practical and strategic actions in support of quality education that reflects and responds to HIV/AIDS. The paper was developed for the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Education. The IATT is convened by UNESCO and includes as members the UN co-sponsoring agencies of UNAIDS, bi-lateral and private donors, and NGOs. The IATT focuses on mobilising commitment to prevention education, acting as a catalyst for the exchange of information about what is known, what is available, and what still needs to be known about how education can be most effective in mitigating the effects of the HIV/AIDS crisis. It seeks to examine and strengthen existing tools for monitoring and evaluating education systems’ responses to the crisis, identify weaknesses in these responses and overcome these weaknesses, analyse what is known to strengthen information and materials exchange, and stimulate research and evidence-based policy-making. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    195813

    Educational aspects of developmental programmes leading to lower fertility: the renewal of education as a population action programme.

    UNESCO

    [Unpublished] 1972. Presented at the Interregional Workshop on Population Action Programmes, Manila, Philippines, November 15-25, 1972. 11 p. (ESA/P/AC.1/15)

    Population is not an isolated variable in the development process; it is one of the many socio-economic variables affecting developing countries in their efforts to attain a higher quality of life. Education must respond to the total socio-economic situation if it is to be expected to contribute to the promotion of change. In order to respond effectively, education must be integrally and relevantly renovated. This integral renovation implies innovation in educational planning and administration, and in curriculum contents and teaching and learning methodologies. Within this framework of renovation population-related issues become important components which must be included in educational activities because of their present and future effect on individuals and society. Population education will then be one of the obvious products of an integral and relevant educational response to the challenges proposed by the process of change. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    186035

    The Alma Ata Declaration and the goal of "Health for All" 25 years later: keeping the dream alive.

    Werner D

    Health for the Millions. 2004 Jan; 30(4-5):23-27.

    In 1978, a potential breakthrough in global health rights took place at an international conference organized by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) in Alma Ata in erstwhile USSR(now Almaty in Kazakhstan). In this Alma Ata Declaration, 134 countries subscribed to the goal of 'Health for All by the Year 2000'. They affirmed WHO's broad definition of health as 'a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being'. The world's nations--together with WHO, UNICEF, and other major funding organizations--pledged to work towards meeting people's basic health needs through the comprehensive and remarkably progressive primary healthcare (PHC) approach. Principals and methods garnered from the barefoot doctors' methodology in China and from experiences of small, struggling community-based health programmes in The Philippines and countries of Latin America. The linkage of many of these enabling initiatives to social transformation movements helps explain why the concepts underlying PHC have been praised as well as criticized for being 'revolutionary'. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    179682

    [Lessons learned concerning water, health and sanitation. Thirteen years of experience in developing countries. Updated edition. Lecciones aprendidas en materia de agua, salud y saneamiento. Trece anos de experiencia en países en desarrollo. Edicion actualizada.

    Camp Dresser and McKee International. Water and Sanitation for Health [WASH]

    Arlington, Virginia, WASH, 1993. [175] p. (USAID Contract No. 5973-Z-00-8081-00)

    As this latest edition of "Lessons Learned" informs us, sustainable development in the water and sanitation sector is not just the construction of an installation or the installation of a hand pump, but the way in which these interventions help people improve their quality of life. More importantly, we see that sustainable development promotes change: change in the way in which power is distributed and technologies are spread. The issue of participation is explored in this report through an analysis of associations of donors, governments, non-governmental organizations, and private for-profit companies. The notion of the association imposes certain responsibilities on the beneficiary governments and their communities. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    182630
    Peer Reviewed

    Initial steps to developing the World Health Organization's Quality of Life Instrument (WHOQOL) module for international assessment in HIV / AIDS. WHOQOL HIV Group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. WHOQOL HIV Group

    AIDS Care. 2003 Jun; 15(3):347-357.

    This paper reports on the three initial steps taken to develop the World Health Organization’s Quality of Life instrument (WHOQOL) module for assessment of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). First, a consultation of international experts was convened to review the suitability of the generic WHOQOL-100 for assessment of PLWHA. The experts proposed additional facets that are specific to the lives of PLWHA. Second, 42 focus groups (N=235) were conducted by six culturally diverse centres comprising of PLWHA, informal carers and health professionals to (1) review the adequacy of the WHOQOL for PLWHA, (2) review the additional facets proposed by the experts, and (3) write additional facets and items for a pilot instrument. Third, results of steps 1 and 2 were consolidated, and a total of 115 items, covering 25 new facets and sub-facets for assessment of QoL specific to PLWHA, were prepared for pilot testing. The new facets included symptoms of HIV, body image, sexual activities, work, social inclusion, disclosure, death and dying, and forgiveness. The implications of cross-cultural QoL assessment for PLWHA are discussed. (author's)
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  20. 20
    181219
    Peer Reviewed

    A decade of the United Nations' convention on the rights of the child: implications for child nutrition and for the conceptualization of norms and interventions in public-health nutrition.

    Solomons NW

    Nutrition. 2000 Jul-Aug; 16(7-8):640-642.

    As we initiate the third millennium, we all must recognize that the goal of “health for all by the year 2000,” enunciated by the World Health Organization, fell far short of becoming a reality. The issue of human rights has emerged increasingly as a topic of public discourse, perhaps in proportion to the extent of their violation. More recently linked to this discussion has been that of food as a human right or nutrition as a human right. For the nutritional scientist, practitioner, or public-health professional, there is a documentary trail that guides us in these considerations. It begins with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, proposed by the late Eleanor Roosevelt, and extends to its derivative covenant: the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). The CRC was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations (U.N.) on November 20, 1989, and entered into force on September 2, 1990. In a matter of months, the force of this document will be entering its second decade. Like the segment of the population it proposes to represent and defend, it has had some growing pains to overcome. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    176948

    Continuation of population programs to improve quality of life.

    Vietnam Population News. 2002 Jul-Sep; (24):3-4.

    An interview with Mr. Omer Ertur, UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Representative in Viet Nam on the occasion of World Population Day, July 11th by Ha Noi Newspaper. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    109266
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL): position paper from the World Health Organization.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. WHOQOL Group

    Social Science and Medicine. 1995 Nov; 41(10):1403-9.

    This paper describes the WHO's (World Health Organization's) project to develop a quality of life instrument (the WHOQOL). It outlines the reasons that the project was undertaken, the thinking that underlies the project, the method that has been followed in its development, and the current status of the project. The WHOQOL assesses individuals' perception of their position in life in the context of the culture and value systems in which they live and in relation to their goals, expectations, standards, and concerns. It has been developed collaboratively in several culturally diverse centers over four years. Piloting of the WHOQOL on some 4500 respondents in 15 cultural settings has been completed. On the basis of this data the revised WHOQOL Field Trial Form has been finalized, and field testing is currently in progress. The WHOQOL produces a multi-dimensional profile of scores across six domains and 24 sub-domains of quality of life. (author's)
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  23. 23
    074857

    International Symposium: For the Survival of Mankind: Population, Environment and Development.

    Mainichi Shimbun; Japan. National Institute for Research Advancement; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    Ann Arbor, Michigan, University of Michigan, Dept. of Population Planning and International Health, [1989]. xxxiii, 134 p.

    In August 1989, scientists and leaders of international and national groups met at the international symposium for the Survival of Mankind in Tokyo, Japan, to discuss ideas about the interrelationship between population, environment, and development and obstacles to attaining sustainable development. The President of the Worldwatch Institute opened the symposium with a talk about energy, food, and population. Of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and solar energy, only the clean and efficient solar energy can provide sustainable development. Humanity has extended arable lands and irrigation causing soil erosion, reduced water tables, produced water shortages, and increased salivation. Thus agricultural advances since the 1950s cannot continue to raise crop yields. He also emphasized the need to halt population growth. He suggested Japan provide more international assistance for sustainable development. This talk stimulated a lively debate. The 2nd session addressed the question whether the planet can support 5. 2 billion people (1989 population). The Executive Director of UNFPA informed the audience that research shows that various factors are needed for a successful population program: political will, a national plan, a prudent assessment of the sociocultural context, support from government agencies, community participation, and improvement of women's status. Other topics discussed during this session were urbanization, deforestation, and international environmental regulation. The 3rd session covered various ways leading to North-South cooperation. A Chinese participant suggested the establishment of an international environmental protection fund which would assist developing countries with their transition to sustainable development and to develop clean energy technologies and environmental restoration. Another participant proposed formation of a North-South Center in Japan. The 4th session centered around means to balance population needs, environmental protection, and socioeconomic development.
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  24. 24
    080184

    Integration of population education in APPEAL. Volume Three. Population education in literacy and continuing education.

    UNESCO. Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific [PROAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO, PROAP, 1992. [3], 115 p. (Population Education Programme Service)

    Workshops were conducted in 1989 and 1991 in Indonesia and Pakistan to discuss the integration of population education into primary school curricula and into continuing education and literacy programs. This document provides a summary of prototype materials for integration of population messages in nonformal education. On-site visits were conducted in the rural villages of Sinar Bakti and Sari Harapan in the eastern district of Lembang, and 24 semi-literate persons were interviewed on demographic information, knowledge, attitudes, practices in family planning, problems and solutions, and aspirations. Workshop participants drafted materials with the help of resource persons, and 1 flip chart, 1 chart, and 2 booklets were field-tested. The core messages were that mother and child health care promotes family welfare; there is a right age for marriage; children can be spaced; women should be allowed to obtain a higher education; educated mothers add to family quality of life; women's groups can be effective; and rapid population growth leads to water shortages. Each of these messages for semi-literates is further differentiated by format, specific objectives, materials, messages and submessages. For example, a flip chart with 11 pictures is developed for stimulating discussion on the benefits of improving women's educational status. The instructions for facilitators are to direct learners to study the pictures and read the text and then direct questions about the messages in the pictures. Learners are expected to explain the pictures and text and draw conclusions. The learning materials from Pakistan were developed based on a needs assessment approach. Interviewers visited houses and asked for knowledge and attitudes on messages about small family size and social welfare, the right marriage age, responsible parenthood, population and development, reorientation of population-related beliefs and values, and enhancement of the status of women. The results of the inquiries are given. An example of these issues is represented in teaching materials for reorienting beliefs on the right marriage age. The target would be out-of-school youths and adults. The focus would be on how 1) early marriage affects the health of the mother and child, and 2) young mothers are not mentally prepared for the consequences of frequent pregnancies. A puppet show is provided as well as a guide for facilitators of discussion.
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  25. 25
    061213

    Health research: essential link to equity in development.

    Commission on Health Research for Development

    Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1990. xix, 136 p.

    The Commission on Health Research for Development is an independent international consortium formed in 1987 to improve the health of people in developing countries by the power of research. This book is the result of 2 years of effort: 19 commissioned papers, 8 expert meetings, 8 regional workshops, case studies of health research activities in 10 developing countries and hundreds of individual discussions. A unique global survey examined financing, locations and promotion of health research. The focus of all this work was the influence of health on development. This book has 3 sections: a review of global health inequities and why health research is needed; findings of country surveys, health research financing, selection of topics and promotion; conclusions and recommendations. Some research priorities are contraception and reproductive health, behavioral health in developing countries, applied research on essential drugs, vitamin A deficiency, substance abuse, tuberculosis. The main recommendations are: that all countries begin essential national health research (ENHR), with international partnership; that larger and sustained international funding for research be mobilized; and that larger and sustained international funding for research be mobilized; and that international mechanisms for monitoring progress be established. The book is full of graphs and contains footnotes, a complete bibliography and an index.
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