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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    278436

    Recommendation for the nutrient requirements for people living with HIV / AIDS.

    Academy for Educational Development [AED]. Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance Project [FANTA]

    Washington, D.C., AED, FANTA, 2004 Jan 8. [2] p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-98-00046-00)

    The nutrient requirements for people living with HIV/AIDS differ from those for non-HIV-infected individuals. These recommendations are based on the report of the May 2003 WHO technical consultation on nutrient requirements for people living with HIV/AIDS. Current evidence suggests that as the HIV infection progresses, the nutrient requirements change. The requirements are different for the two distinct phases of HIV infection, which are characterized by the absence or presence of illness symptoms: asymptomatic and symptomatic. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    182566
    Peer Reviewed

    Nutritional status of vegetarian and omnivorous adolescent girls. [Estado nutricional de adolescentes vegetarianas y omnívoras]

    Meirelles CD; da Veiga GV; Soares ED

    Nutrition Research. 2001 May; 21(5):689-702.

    This study compared the dietary and anthropometric profile of 24 ovo-lacto-vegetarian and 36 omnivorous female adolescents, between 15 and 18 years old. Weight, height and skinfolds were measured. Food frequency questionnaires and a three day food record were used for dietary assessment. Vegetarians presented subscapular, suprailiac and midaxillary skinfolds statistically higher than omnivores, but the percent body fat was not different. The vegetarian diet provided smaller amounts of energy than that of the omnivores ( p < 0.05) and only 17% of the vegetarians was able to reach the recommended allowance for protein. Regarding calcium, 83% of the vegetarians and 69% of the omnivores ate less than 2/3 of the recommended allowances and a significantly higher percentage of vegetarians presented low ingestion of iron, riboflavin, and niacin than omnivores ( p < 0.05). It was concluded that the intake of vegetarians was lower in fat and cholesterol, and less adequate in micronutrients than the omnivores ones. (author's)
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  3. 3
    083909

    Hunger and malnutrition: the determinant of development: the case for Africa and its food and nutrition workers.

    Maletnlema TN

    East African Medical Journal. 1992 Aug; 69(8):424-7.

    Hunger and malnutrition in Africa have been on the increase since the 1960s. During the 1970s, it is estimated that 30 million people were directly affected by famine and malnutrition. About 5 million children died in 1984 alone. In Mozambique during the 1983-84 famine, about 100,000 people perished. In Ethiopia, Sudan, Somalia, Liberia, and Angola armed conflicts compound the problem. Ethiopia alone had 9 million famine victims in 1983. The most common form of malnutrition in Africa is protein energy deficiency affecting over 100 million people, especially 30-50 million children under 5 years of age. Almost another 200 million are at risk. Iron deficiency, commonly called anemia, also affects 150 million people, mostly women and children. Iodine deficiency leads to disorders like mental retardation, cretinism, deafness, abortion, low resistance to disease, and goiter and this affects 60 million with about 150 million more at risk. Vitamin A deficiency causes blindness and low resistance to disease and affects about 10 million. Protein energy deficiency is treated by using donated foods in hospitals, rehabilitation centers, day care centers, and feeding centers. There are no community programs for anemia, or vitamin A or iodine deficiencies. Vaccines for preventing and drugs for treating diseases that cause malnutrition are imported. Therefore, African food and nutrition professionals met in 1988 and created the Africa Council for Food and Nutrition Sciences (AFRONUS) to eliminate famine and malnutrition in Africa. Activities have started in: 1) developing contacts between the workers in food and nutrition; 2) assessing the situation of food and nutrition in Africa; 3) developing an action plan; 4) implementing the plan; and 5) monitoring progress. Food and Nutrition Policy Guidelines have also been prepared by AFRONUS for food and nutrition workers. Africa has enough natural resources to solve the problem of hunger and malnutrition, but these resources have to be harnessed.
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  4. 4
    040749

    Energy and protein requirements.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Rome, Italy, FAO, 1973. 118 p. (FAO Nutrition Meetings Report Series No. 52; WHO Technical Report Series No. 522)

    The present Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) Ad Hoc Expert Committee met from March 22 to April 2, 1971 to consider energy and protein requirements together and to examine fully this interrelationships so that a diet or a food supply might be assessed simultaneously in terms of its energy and protein content. Its specific tasks were to: examine the characteristics and criteria of the reference man and reference woman; review new data as a basis for revising estimates of requirements and recommended intakes for energy, protein, and essential amino acids; and consider the method of chemical scoring and other methods used in the evaluation of the nutritive value of proteins. The committee was asked to examine the interrelationships between requirements for energy and proteins and to recommend means for the integration of requirement scales for energy and proteins, if that were feasible. Additionally, this committee report includes a discussion of basic concepts, a glossary of terms and units, some background information, as well as identification of practical applications and future research needs. 5 annexes contain: percentiles for weight and height of males and females aged 0-18 years; calculation of the energy values of foods or food groups by the Atwater system; conversion of nitrogen to protein; standard basal metabolic rates of individuals of both sexes; and some values of energy expenditures in everyday activities.
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