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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    781353

    A.I.D.'s research program to develop new and improved means of fertility control. (Statement, May 2, 1978)

    SPEIDEL JJ

    In: United States. Congress. House of Representatives. Select Committee on Population. Population and development: research in population and development: needs and capacities. Vol. 3. Hearings, May 2-4, 1978. Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, 1978. p. 287-319

    USAID, in attempts to develop and improve means of fertility control, spent $4.8 million on new ways to control corpus luteum function and block progestational activity, $4.4 million to develop gonadotropin releasing factors, and $6 million on prostaglandins as a means of inducing the menses or terminating pregnancy in the second trimester. Studies at Johns Hopkins University developed thyrotropin releasing hormones to ensure postpartum infertility without interfering with lactation. Research to improve current forms of birth control amounts to $16.5 million. Side effects of oral contraceptives, single aperture laparoscopic sterilization, reversible male sterilization, and tissue glues for non-surgical female sterilization are some of the new techniques being funded by USAID. $19 million has been allocated to evaluate contraceptive programs in developing countries. Funds have come from DHEW, the Ford foundation, the Population Council, pharmaceutical companies, and WHO. Although improved birth control is desireable, money is best spent supplying available methods to developing countries.
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  2. 2
    753743

    An overview of research approaches to the control of male fertility.

    Perry MI; Speidel JJ; Winter JN

    In: Sciarra, J.J., Markland, C. and Speidel, J.J., eds. Control of male fertility. (Proceedings of a Workshop on the Control of Male Fertility, San Francisco, June 19-21, 1974). Hagerstown, Maryland, Harper and Row, 1975. p. 274-307

    Literature on research approaches to permanent and relatively reversible methods of male fertility control is reviewed. Sources and expenditures for research into male fertility control are noted. Permanent methods discussed include electrocautery of the vas, transcutaneous interruption of the vas, vasectomy clips, chemical occlusion of the vas, and passive immunization. Reversible methods reviewed include vasovasotomy, intravasal plugs, and vas valves. Current research into animal models, reversibility after vas occlusion, nonocclusive surgical techniques, pharmacological alteration of male reproductive function, including adrenergic blocking agents, steroidal compounds, inhibitors of gonadotropin secretion, clomiphene citrate, organosiloxanes, prostaglandins, alpha-chlorohydrin, heterocyclic agents, and alkylating agents, and delivery systems for antifertility agents is discussed. Research into semen storage and improved condoms is also reviewed. As a relatively low proportion of funds are committed to research in male fertility control, a greater investment in applied and clinical research is warranted.
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  3. 3
    712778

    Expanding horizons in population control.

    Ravenholt RT

    War on Hunger. 1971 Oct 17-18; 5(10):1-3, 17-18.

    The Agency for International Development (AID) is involved in a world wide program of assistance for population activities. In 1973, $125,000,000 was authorized for population programs by the U.S. Congress. AID has provided funding to the U.N. population program, to the Pan American Health Organization, the International Planned Parenthood Federation, and numerous other international family planning organizations. Through country missions, AID has provided $100,000,000 in grants for population and family planning programs in 32 developing countries. AID has provided $21,000,000 for development of fertility control methods, with a particular emphasis on prostaglandin research. AID also provides support for agencies involved in demographic studies as well as to university population centers.
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