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  1. 1
    782755

    Contraceptive development.

    BIALY G

    CRP Population Research. 1978 Nov; 33-34.

    The Contraceptive Development Branch (CDB) program conducts research in 2 areas: 1) reproductive processes and 2) product development. Research on reproductive processes improved the understanding of gamete transport and has better identified corpus luteum functions and the role of prostaglandins. The biology and biochemistry of the ovum has been studied, and in vitro fertilization investigated. The mechanism of spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and subsequent fertilization have been observed. Moreover, CDB has participated in the distribution of a variety of reagents to the scientific community, to stimulate research on the antipregnancy vaccine. In the area of product development, the CDB continues experimenting with the synthesis of new chemicals to regulate human fertility, the issue of safety being the primary motivation of the program. Approximately 1100 new chemicals have been synthesized and tested on laboratory animals. A drug testing program was initiated in 1972, providing feedback of biological data, and representing the major drug testing effort in the U.S. Considerable progress has been made in the area of implantable and oral contraceptives, and in the area of devices for fertility regulation, and for sexual sterilization. Clinical studies sponsored by CDB are ongoing.
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  2. 2
    781353

    A.I.D.'s research program to develop new and improved means of fertility control. (Statement, May 2, 1978)

    SPEIDEL JJ

    In: United States. Congress. House of Representatives. Select Committee on Population. Population and development: research in population and development: needs and capacities. Vol. 3. Hearings, May 2-4, 1978. Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, 1978. p. 287-319

    USAID, in attempts to develop and improve means of fertility control, spent $4.8 million on new ways to control corpus luteum function and block progestational activity, $4.4 million to develop gonadotropin releasing factors, and $6 million on prostaglandins as a means of inducing the menses or terminating pregnancy in the second trimester. Studies at Johns Hopkins University developed thyrotropin releasing hormones to ensure postpartum infertility without interfering with lactation. Research to improve current forms of birth control amounts to $16.5 million. Side effects of oral contraceptives, single aperture laparoscopic sterilization, reversible male sterilization, and tissue glues for non-surgical female sterilization are some of the new techniques being funded by USAID. $19 million has been allocated to evaluate contraceptive programs in developing countries. Funds have come from DHEW, the Ford foundation, the Population Council, pharmaceutical companies, and WHO. Although improved birth control is desireable, money is best spent supplying available methods to developing countries.
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