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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    183451

    School-age children: their nutrition and health.

    Drake L; Maier C; Jukes M; Patrikios A; Bundy D

    SCN News. 2002 Dec; (25):4-30.

    This paper addresses the most common nutrition and health problems in turn, assessing the extent of the problem; the impact of the condition on overall development, and what programmatic responses can be taken to remedy the problem through the school sys- tern. The paper also acknowledges that an estimated 113m children of school-age are not in school, the majority of these children living in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. Poor health and nutrition that differentially affects this population is also discussed. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    162521
    Peer Reviewed

    The prognostic value of the World Health Organisation staging system for HIV infection and disease in rural Uganda.

    Malamba SS; Morgan D; Clayton T; Mayanja B; Okongo M

    AIDS. 1999; 13(18):2555-62.

    The objective was to assess whether the WHO staging classification for HIV provides prognostically valuable and applicable information in rural Uganda. Data were obtained from a population-based cohort of 232 HIV-infected individuals. Clinical information was obtained using a detailed questionnaire and ascertained by physical examination. Participants were seen routinely every 3 months and when they were sick. A computer algorithm based on clinical history, examination and laboratory findings was used to stage HIV-positive participants at each routine visit. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and the Cox proportional hazard model were used to assess the prognostic strength of the clinical and laboratory categories of the system. An attendance rate of 81% and 799 person-years of follow-up were achieved. Survival probability estimates at 6 years from being seen in clinical stages 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 63%, 46%, 24%, and 6%, respectively. When staging was revised to incorporate lymphocyte categories, the survival probabilities were 73%, 62%, 39%, and 6%, respectively. Unexplained prolonged fever and severe bacterial infection had survival probabilities closer to stage 2 conditions, mucocutaneous herpes simplex virus infection for more than 1 month and cryptosporidiosis with diarrhea for more than 1 month closer to stage 3 and oral candidiasis closer to stage 4 conditions. Even without the laboratory markers, the clinical category of the WHO staging system is useful for predicting survival in individuals with HIV disease. This is important for areas with limited access to laboratory markers. A simple rearrangement of a few clinical conditions could improve the prognostic significance of the WHO system. (author's)
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  3. 3
    144473
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. IV. Postpartum bleeding and lochia in breast-feeding women.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    FERTILITY AND STERILITY.. 1999 Sep; 72(3):441-7.

    The main purpose of this study was to compare the duration of postpartum lochia among 7 groups of breast-feeding women, and in addition, to investigate whether age, parity, birth weight, or the amount of breast-feeding affects this duration. The participants included 4118 breast-feeding women aged 20-37 years living in China, Guatemala, Australia, India, Nigeria, Chile, or Sweden. The duration of lochia, frequency of an end-of-puerperium bleeding episode, and frequency of post-lochia bleeding episodes within 56 days of delivery were measured. This study revealed that the median duration of lochia was 27 days and varied significantly among the centers (range, 22-34 days). In about 11% of the women, lochia lasted >40 days. An end-of-puerperium bleeding episode around the 40th day postpartum was reported by 20.3% of the women. Bleeding within 56 days of delivery (separated from lochia by at least 14 days) occurred in 11.3% of the women and usually was followed by a confirmatory bleeding episode 21-70 days later. This study was able to quantify the average duration of postpartum lochia at 3-5 weeks, with significant variations by population. Lochia durations of >40 days were not unusual. A separate and distinct end-of-puerperium bleeding episode occurred in 1 out of every 4-5 women, although it is unclear how this phenomenon is clinically, socially, or culturally significant.
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  4. 4
    144472
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. III. Pregnancy during breast-feeding.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    FERTILITY AND STERILITY.. 1999 Sep; 72(3):431-40.

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to determine the risk of pregnancy during lactational amenorrhea relative to infant feeding status. The participants included 4118 breast-feeding mother-infant pairs, with maternal age of 20-37 years, recruited from 7 study centers located in China, Guatemala, Australia, India, Nigeria, Chile, and Sweden. Infant feeding practices, menstrual status, and the number of pregnancies were recorded. The results revealed that in the first 6 months after childbirth, cumulative pregnancy rate during amenorrhea, depending on how the end of amenorrhea was defined, ranged from 0.9% (95% confidential interval (CI) = 0-2%) to 1.2% (95% CI = 0-2.4%) during full breast-feeding, and from 0.7% (95% CI = 0.1-1.3%) to 0.8% (95% CI = 0.2-1.4%) up to the end of partial breast-feeding. At 12 months, the rates ranged from 6.6% (95% CI = 1.9-11.2%) to 7.4% (95% CI = 2.5-12.3%) during full breast-feeding, and from 3.7% (95% CI = 1.9-5.5%) to 5.2% (95% CI = 3.1-7.4%) up to the end of partial breast-feeding. Regardless of the degree of supplementation, the pregnancy rate increased with time from 6th to the 12th month postpartum. Overall, the rate of pregnancy during amenorrhea was unaffected by variations in the return of menses. This large, multicenter study found that the cumulative 6-month rate of pregnancy during lactational amenorrhea was between 0.8% (95% CI = 0-1.4%) and 1.2% (95% CI = 0-2.4%). This is equivalent to the protection provided by many nonpermanent contraceptive methods as they are actually used and upholds the 1988 Bellagio Consensus.
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