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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    308077
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. II. Factors associated with the length of amenorrhea.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    Fertility and Sterility. 1998 Sep; 70(3):461-471.

    The objective was to determine the relation between infant feeding practices (and other factors) and the duration of postpartum amenorrhea, and to establish whether there are real differences in the duration of postpartum amenorrhea for similar breast-feeding practices in different populations. Design: Prospective, nonexperimental, longitudinal follow-up study. Setting: Five developing and two developed countries. Patient(s): Four thousand one hundred eighteen breast-feeding mothers and their infants. Breast-feeding women collected ongoing information about infant feeding and family planning practices, plus the return of menses. Fortnightly follow-up occurred in the women's homes. A multivariate analysis explored the association between the risk of menses return and 16 infant feeding variables and 11 other characteristics. Ten factors (in addition to center effects) were significantly related to the duration of amenorrhea. Seven of these were infant feeding characteristics and the remaining three were high parity, low body mass index, and a higher frequency of infant illness. The breast-feeding stimulus is strongly linked to the duration of postpartum amenorrhea. Cross-cultural effects also are extremely important and may have caused the variations in feeding, the variation in amenorrhea, or both. (author's)
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  2. 2
    303426
    Peer Reviewed

    The WHO dengue classification and case definitions: time for a reassessment. [Clasificación del dengue y definición de casos de la OMS: tiempo de una nueva evaluación]

    Deen JL; Harris E; Wills B; Balmaseda A; Hammond SN

    Lancet. 2006 Jul 8; 368(9530):170-173.

    Dengue is the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral disease in people. It is caused by four dengue virus serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, and DEN-4), of the genus Flavivirus, and transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Infection provides life-long immunity against the infecting viral serotype, but not against the other serotypes. Although most of the estimated 100 million dengue virus infections each year do not come to the attention of medical staff , of those that do, the most common clinical manifestation is non-specific febrile illness or classic dengue fever. About 250 000--500 000 patients developing more severe disease. The risk of severe disease is several times higher in sequential than in primary dengue virus infections. Despite the large numbers of people infected with the virus each year, the existing WHO dengue classification scheme and case definitions have some drawbacks. In addition, the widely used guidelines are not always reproducible in different countries--a quality that is crucial to effective surveillance and reporting as well as global disease comparisons. And, as dengue disease spreads to different parts of the globe, several investigators have reported difficulties in using the system, and some have had to create new categories or new case definitions to represent the observed patterns of disease more accurately. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    182031
    Peer Reviewed

    Estimating induced abortion rates: a review.

    Rossier C

    Studies in Family Planning. 2003 Jun; 34(2):87-102.

    Legal abortions are authorized medical procedures, and as such, they are or can be recorded at the health facility where they are performed. The incidence of illegal, often unsafe, induced abortion has to be estimated, however. In the literature, no fewer than eight methods have been used to estimate the frequency of induced abortion: the “illegal abortion provider survey,” the “complications statistics” approach, the “mortality statistics” approach, self-reporting techniques, prospective studies, the “residual” method, anonymous third party reports, and experts’ estimates. This article describes the methodological requirements of each of these methods and discusses their biases. Empirical records for each method are reviewed, with particular attention paid to the contexts in which the method has been employed successfully. Finally, the choice of an appropriate method of estimation is discussed, depending on the context in which it is to be applied and on the goal of the estimation effort. (author's)
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  4. 4
    074724

    Child mortality since the 1960s: a database for developing countries.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Development. Population Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1992. viii, 400 p. (ST/ESA/SER.A/128)

    Available child mortality data are provided since the 1960s for 82 developing countries, arranged alphabetically, with a population of >1 million. The scope and methodology of the data, the main findings, a guide to the notation and layout of the database, and country specific profiles are included. Available data are included from many different sources without adjustment; graphs are provided. There is a brief discussion of the nature of child mortality and the methods used to measure it such as the crude death rate, age specific death rates, the infant mortality rate, <5 mortality, mortality 1-5 years, and model life tables for age specific child mortality. There is also discussion of the various data sources and estimation methods: vital registration data, prospective surveys, household surveys, prospective sample surveys, surveillance systems, retrospective questions in censuses and surveys, questions on recent household deaths by age, Brass method questions to whom on aggregate number of children born or dead, questions on women's most recent birth and survival, and maternity histories. Commentary is provided on the common index approach and the intersurvey change approach to evaluation of child mortality estimates. There is not 1 best method for measuring mortality. Countries with the most complete reporting of vital registration data are Hong Kong, Israel, Mauritius, Puerto Rico, and Singapore. Countries with incomplete data which does not provide a good measure of child mortality are Egypt, El Salvador, Guatemala, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago. Brass estimates which agree with vital registration data include the following countries: Costa Rica, Cuba, Kuwait, and Peninsular Malaysia. Indirect estimates which confirm vital registration data pertain to Chile and Uruguay. Brass questions provide satisfactory results in Costa Rica, Cuba, Egypt, El Salvador, Guatemala, Jamaica, Sri Lanka, and Trinidad and Tobago. Underestimates are expected for Argentina and Egypt. Indirect methods applied to census data provide good estimates for 23 countries, indirect methods applied to survey data yields good estimates for 21 countries, and direct calculations from maternity histories provide good estimates for 20 countries. 17 countries have poor results from maternity histories alone. Child mortality may have fallen by >50% in developing countries between 1960-85.
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  5. 5
    144473
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. IV. Postpartum bleeding and lochia in breast-feeding women.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    FERTILITY AND STERILITY.. 1999 Sep; 72(3):441-7.

    The main purpose of this study was to compare the duration of postpartum lochia among 7 groups of breast-feeding women, and in addition, to investigate whether age, parity, birth weight, or the amount of breast-feeding affects this duration. The participants included 4118 breast-feeding women aged 20-37 years living in China, Guatemala, Australia, India, Nigeria, Chile, or Sweden. The duration of lochia, frequency of an end-of-puerperium bleeding episode, and frequency of post-lochia bleeding episodes within 56 days of delivery were measured. This study revealed that the median duration of lochia was 27 days and varied significantly among the centers (range, 22-34 days). In about 11% of the women, lochia lasted >40 days. An end-of-puerperium bleeding episode around the 40th day postpartum was reported by 20.3% of the women. Bleeding within 56 days of delivery (separated from lochia by at least 14 days) occurred in 11.3% of the women and usually was followed by a confirmatory bleeding episode 21-70 days later. This study was able to quantify the average duration of postpartum lochia at 3-5 weeks, with significant variations by population. Lochia durations of >40 days were not unusual. A separate and distinct end-of-puerperium bleeding episode occurred in 1 out of every 4-5 women, although it is unclear how this phenomenon is clinically, socially, or culturally significant.
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  6. 6
    144472
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization multinational study of breast-feeding and lactational amenorrhea. III. Pregnancy during breast-feeding.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Methods for the Natural Regulation of Fertility

    FERTILITY AND STERILITY.. 1999 Sep; 72(3):431-40.

    This prospective longitudinal study aimed to determine the risk of pregnancy during lactational amenorrhea relative to infant feeding status. The participants included 4118 breast-feeding mother-infant pairs, with maternal age of 20-37 years, recruited from 7 study centers located in China, Guatemala, Australia, India, Nigeria, Chile, and Sweden. Infant feeding practices, menstrual status, and the number of pregnancies were recorded. The results revealed that in the first 6 months after childbirth, cumulative pregnancy rate during amenorrhea, depending on how the end of amenorrhea was defined, ranged from 0.9% (95% confidential interval (CI) = 0-2%) to 1.2% (95% CI = 0-2.4%) during full breast-feeding, and from 0.7% (95% CI = 0.1-1.3%) to 0.8% (95% CI = 0.2-1.4%) up to the end of partial breast-feeding. At 12 months, the rates ranged from 6.6% (95% CI = 1.9-11.2%) to 7.4% (95% CI = 2.5-12.3%) during full breast-feeding, and from 3.7% (95% CI = 1.9-5.5%) to 5.2% (95% CI = 3.1-7.4%) up to the end of partial breast-feeding. Regardless of the degree of supplementation, the pregnancy rate increased with time from 6th to the 12th month postpartum. Overall, the rate of pregnancy during amenorrhea was unaffected by variations in the return of menses. This large, multicenter study found that the cumulative 6-month rate of pregnancy during lactational amenorrhea was between 0.8% (95% CI = 0-1.4%) and 1.2% (95% CI = 0-2.4%). This is equivalent to the protection provided by many nonpermanent contraceptive methods as they are actually used and upholds the 1988 Bellagio Consensus.
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