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  1. 1
    650525

    Neuroendocrinology and reproduction in the human.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1965. 19 p. (WHO Technical Report Series No. 304)

    This WHO technical report focuses on the 1) psychosomatic factors in human reproduction; 2) hypothalamo-hypophyseal system; 3) mechanism of sexual rhythm; 4) nervous influences on the hypothalamus; 5) hormonal influences on the hypothalamus; 6) neuroendocrine aspects of sexual behavior; and 7) effects of drugs on reproduction. After summarizing current research status on the above-mentioned topics, the following research needs are suggested: 1) assays of individual human endogenous gonadotropins, suitable for clinical application; 2) autoradiography, fluorescent-antibody, spectrophometric interference and histochemical and biochemical techniques for studying cells that supply axons to the primary capillary plexus of the hypophyseal portal system and for studying effects of different hormonal status on hypothalmic structure and function; 3) computer techniques for evaluating electrophysiological data; 4) improved lesioning techniques; 5) comparative studies of reproductive activity patterns, exteroceptive factors, neuroendocrine factors in sexual and related social behavior, and long-term or delayed effects of drugs administered during gestation on subsequent sexual development; 6) studies of synaptic connections of hypothalamic neurones; 7) studies of endogenous gonadal and gonadotropin production in prepuberal animals; 8) functional significance of regional distribution of hypophyseal portal system; 9) mechanisms involved in selective uptake of labeled hormones; 10) hypothalamic lesions in species with spontaneous ovulation and active luteal function; 11) direct effect of gonadal hormones on single hypothalamic neurones studied with combination of microinjection and unit recording devices; 12) studies of the possibility of a direct feedback of gonadotropic hormones on the hypothalamus; 13) studies of the receptor mechanisms involved in neuroendocrine reflexes; 14) wider exploration of brain structures, with regard to feedback action of gonadal hormones; 15) studies of pineal function; 16) further investigation of a possible role of the peripheral autonomic pathways in reproductive processes; and 17) research on the application of tissue culture techniques for studying problems of the origin and metabolic effects of neurohormonal mediators and the biochemcial and morphological changes induced by sex hormones.
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  2. 2
    660150

    Immunological aspects of human reproduction: report of a WHO Scientific Group.

    WHO SCIENTIFIC GROUP

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1966. (Technical Report Series No. 334.) 21 p.

    A WHO Scientific Group on Immunological Aspects of Human Reproduction met in Geneva October 4-9, 1965. Topics of discussion included: 1) immunology of human gonadotropins; 2) sperm and seminal fluid; 3) blood group antigens and human reproduction; and 4) maternal-fetal immunological interactions. It was concluded that further investigations are required to study: 1) the correlation between physiocochemical, biological, and immunological criteria for the purity of antigens concerned in human reproduction; 2) the chemical structure of hormones concerned with reproduction, with special reference to the biologically active sites and the nature of antibodies against these active sites; 3) production of antibodies to the gonadotropins by the use of adjuvants and/or chemically modified gonadotropins; 4) modification of hormones from other species to render them active but non-antigenic in man; 5) the use of immunological methods for assisting in the detection of the time of ovulation: these could aid in the control of fertility and in the treatment of infertility; 6) the development of strains of animals of high immunological competence; 7) characterization of the male antigens responsible for various immunological phenomena in males; 8) characterization of male antigens responsible for inducing circulating antibodies and reducing the fertility of immunized females; 9) the nature and biological significance of the antagglutinins; 10) possible ways of interfering with the transmission of antibodies in man; and 11) the possible occurrence of specific antitrophoblastic antibodies in pre and postpartum. Other research needs are also outlined.
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  3. 3
    777188

    Research requirements: fertility regulation during human lactation.

    Potts M

    JOURNAL OF BIOSOCIAL SCIENCE. 1977; (Suppl 4):199-208.

    Research areas dealing with contraception for lactating women was the main topic of 1 session of an (IPPF) International Planned Parenthood Federation workshop. The effects of steroids on lactation are mentioned. IPPF sponsors nondoctor, community-based distribution programs for oral contraceptives (OCs) in many developing countries. The Central Medical Committee of the IPPF has publicized the findings that combined OCs have adverse effects on the quantity and possible quality of milk. They recommend that OCs not be started until lactation has been well established. This is vague and unhelpful advice. It is suggested that progestogen-only pills could be marketed for countries where the illiteracy is high showing a picture of a mother with a small infant. Combined pills could have a picture with a mother and an older child. Distribution would, thus, be simplified. Scientific research might be conducted into optimum birth intervals. Research could also be conducted into a contraceptive with a high level of prolactin and a low level of steroids for lactating women. Discussion of the topic paper deal with various aspects of contraception and lactation.
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  4. 4
    776165

    Hormonal changes in the menstrual cycle.

    DICZFALUSY E; LANDREN B-M

    In: Diczfalusy, E., ed. Regulation of human fertility. (Proceedings of the WHO Symposium on Advances in Fertility Regulation, Moscow, USSR, November 16-19, 1976) Copenhagan, Denmark, Scriptor, 1977. p. 21-71

    This chapter reviews the hormonal changes which occur during the menstrual cycle. During the last days of the preceeding menstrual cycle, plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) increase. Follicular phase is characterized by gradually increasing estrogens. A few days preceding the LH surge, some little understood changes in estradiol, LH, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone, on one hand, and ACTH, cortisol, and aldosterone, on the other, occur. Evidence indicates that the estradiol peak occurs first, followed by a simultaneous rise and fall in LH and 17-hydroxyprogesterone values. The peak period of LH is about 32-44 hours long, during which time a rise in progesterone levels takes place. Other pituitary and steroid hormones (human chorionic gonadotropin, ACTH, prolactin, testosterine, androstenedione, cortisol, and aldosterone) show elevated levels during the periovulatory period. Ovulation occurs 16-48 hours after LH peak. The period following LH surge is characterized by rapidly increasing levels of progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and 20-alpha-dihydroprogesterone, accompanied by moderately increasing estrogen levels to form the typical luteal-phase hormonal pattern. A luteal increase occurs also in levels of several other hormones, ranging from renin activity to angiotension, or from pregninolone to aldosterone. The last part of the luteal phase is characterized by rapidly declining levels of peripheral hormones. The perimenstrual phase around onset of heavy bleeding is characterized by gradually decreasing levels of progesterone, 20-alpha-hydroprogesterone, estradiol, and testosterone, associated with an incipient rise in LH and FSH levels.
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