Your search found 757 Results

  1. 1
    375634

    Progress on drinking water, sanitation and hygiene: 2017 update and SDG baselines.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF

    Geneva, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 114 p.

    This report presents the first ever estimates of the population using ‘safely managed’ drinking water and sanitation services – meaning drinking water free from contamination that is available at home when needed, and toilets whereby excreta are treated and disposed of safely. It also documents progress towards ending open defecation and achieving universal access to basic services. The report identifies a number of critical data gaps that will need to be addressed in order to enable systematic monitoring of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets and to realize the commitment to ‘leave no one behind’.
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  2. 2
    374438

    Bangladesh. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of Bangladesh

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB, the IPPF Member Association in Bangladesh) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. The government has made some progress towards its pledges, but existing efforts are not enough to deliver on its promises by 2020. In addition, other problems and gaps have emerged. The government must address these problems urgently. Civil society calls on the government to: Increase the budgetary allocation to family planning and reduce the resource gap for family planning by 50% by 2021. The government pledged US $40 million per year (or US $380 million by 2021), but since 2009, increases to the annual development budget have not met this commitment; Expand access to long-acting and reversible contraception (LARC) in order to ensure that vulnerable groups have access and choice of family planning methods; Empower women and girls to make family planning choices and freely exercise their sexual and reproductive rights.
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  3. 3
    374437

    Zimbabwe. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Zimbabwe. National Family Planning Council

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Zimbabwe National Family Planning Council (ZNFPC, the IPPF Collaborating Partner in Zimbabwe) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Facilitate the active participation of girls and young women, including those who are marginalized and those living with HIV, in all aspects of national programming and decision-making relating to HIV and AIDS; Strengthen commitment to women’s health by responding to the health impact of unsafe abortion, a major public health concern, by scaling up post-abortion care and reducing unintended pregnancies through expanded and improved family planning services; Implement evidence-based HIV prevention programmes that address the needs of girls and young women, especially those living in prison or detention centres, those involved in transactional sex or child marriages, survivors of gender-based violence and orphans.
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  4. 4
    374436

    Zambia. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ, the IPPF Member Association in Zambia) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Demonstrate that family planning is a top priority on its development agenda by allocating more resources towards family planning. Currently, there are a lot of competing priorities resulting in fewer resources for family planning. Increases to the family planning budget should be sustained in subsequent budgets and the government should consult with civil society to decide how these resources can be used most effectively; Create a dedicated budget line for family planning to ensure that resources are appropriately distributed and used for family planning. CSOs must be involved in the discussion to help formulate clear aims for family planning funding that are informed by their experiences in communities, with the people who need access to services; Allocate government staff and resources to engage with religious and traditional leaders and communities, particularly in the poorest and most under-served areas, to reduce socio-cultural barriers to family planning.
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  5. 5
    374435

    Pakistan. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of Pakistan [FPAP]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    Rahnuma, Family Planning Association of Pakistan (Rahnuma-FPAP, the IPPF Member Association in Pakistan) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Demonstrate political commitment to deliver the FP2020 pledges. To date, there has been slow progress on all family planning indicators due to inadequate financial commitments and ownership by governments and government ministries; Allocate government funding to family planning at the provincial level. Budgets are a responsibility of provincial governments, due to devolution; Invest in effective procurement and logistics systems for family planning to ensure commodity security and address unmet need for family planning, including unmet need for long-acting reversible contraceptives. In the absence of a functioning supply chain, unmet need will increase.
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  6. 6
    374434

    Kenya. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Health Options Kenya [FHOK]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK, the IPPF Member Association in Kenya), the Centre for the Study of Adolescence (CSA) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Respond to severe shortages of health workers and poor working conditions in the health sector; Recruit 17,000 health workers by 2017 and an additional 40,000 community health extension workers by 2017 (in accordance with promises made at the Human Resources for Health Conference in Brazil, 2013); Improve the procurement and supply of FP commodities. Currently, Kenya can access FP commodities for free, but only when they are ordered alone. The Kenya Medical Supplies Authority (KEMSA) often orders FP supplies with other essential supplies, and as a result the government has to pay for them, wasting valuable resources; Accelerate the training of trainers on new FP technologies to increase access to developments in family planning. New family planning technologies offer different benefits compared to modern family planning methods currently available. However, health workers must be trained to deliver them.
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  7. 7
    374433

    Indonesia. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Perkumpulan Keluarga Berencana Indonesia [PKBI]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (PKBI/IPPA, the IPPF Member Association in Indonesia) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. The government has made some progress towards its pledges, but existing efforts are not enough to deliver on its promises by 2020. In addition, other problems and gaps have emerged. The government must address these problems urgently. Civil society calls on the government to: Create a dedicated budget line for family planning and increase budget allocations for family planning. Currently, only 2.2% of the health budget is allocated for nutrition and maternal health and family planning, which falls short of the US $263.7 million target pledged at the 2012 Family Planning Summit. Although the government increased the health budget by 1.5% from 2014-2015, it is not clear how much of the increase was allocated to family planning; Amend Population Law 52/2009 to state that family planning services must not discriminate on the basis of marital status. To implement this amendment, the government must issue new health service delivery guidelines and raise awareness of the policy change; Establish mechanisms to involve young people in government decision-making processes. Youth programmes, in particular, must take into account young people’s needs and demands in order to be effective.
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  8. 8
    374431

    India. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of India [FPAI]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Spotlight on Family Planning series offers a snapshot on progress governments have made in delivering on their FP2020 pledges, made at the London 2012 Family Planning Summit. The Family Planning Association of India (FPA India), the IPPF Member Association in India) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods.
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  9. 9
    374432

    Philippines. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Organization of the Philippines [FPOP]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP, the IPPF Member Association in the Philippines) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Improve implementation of the Reproductive Health Law by issuing clear guidance to government agencies and local government units with regards to what their duties and responsibilities are in relation to the RH Law; Implement behaviour change programmes for bureaucrats, health workers and civil servants so they clearly understand their responsibilities with regards to the RH Law, and to eliminate any possibility that they will misinterpret the Law.
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  10. 10
    375638

    Ending AIDS: Progress towards the 90-90-90 targets. Global AIDS update -- 2017.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2017. 198 p. (UNAIDS/JC2900E)

    Since they were launched at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia, in 2014, the 90-90-90 targets have become a central pillar of the global quest to end the AIDS epidemic. The targets reflect a fundamental shift in the world’s approach to HIV treatment, moving it away from a focus on the number of people accessing antiretroviral therapy and towards the importance of maximising viral suppression among people living with HIV. This shift was driven by greater understanding of the benefits of viral suppression -- not only does treatment protect people living with HIV from AIDS-related illness, but it also greatly lowers the risk of transmitting the virus to others.
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  11. 11
    375327

    The Cervical Cancer Prevention Initiative: Investing in Cervical Cancer Prevention 2015–2020. Year One update, November 2016.

    Wittet S

    [Seattle, Washington], PATH, 2016 Nov. 7 p.

    It has been a year since the groundbreaking meeting in London where the Cervical Cancer Prevention Initiative was launched. This short report documents progress building the Initiative over the past 12 months, and lists key global milestones in cervical cancer during that time.
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  12. 12
    375275

    For every child, end AIDS -- Seventh stocktaking report, 2016.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2016 Dec. 92 p.

    Despite remarkable achievements in the prevention and treatment of HIV, this report finds that progress has been uneven globally. In 2015, more than half of the world’s new infections (1.1 million out of 2.1 million) were among women, children and adolescents, and nearly 2 million adolescents aged 10-19 were living with HIV. In sub-Saharan Africa, the region most impacted by HIV, three in four new infections in 15-19-year-olds were among girls. The report proposes strategies for preventing HIV among women, children and adolescents who have been left behind, and treating those who are living with HIV.
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  13. 13
    370002

    FP2020 momentum at the midpoint 2015-2016.

    Scoggins S; Bremner J

    [Washington, D.C.], FP2020, 2016. 139 p.

    This report marks the halfway point of the FP2020 initiative, and reflects the substantial progress made to date: 1) There are now more than 300 million women and girls using modern contraception in the world’s 69 poorest countries—a milestone that has taken decades to achieve. 2) More than 30 million of those users have been added since 2012, when FP2020 was launched. 3) In Eastern and Southern Africa, for the first time ever, more than 30% of women and girls are using a modern method of contraception. 4) In West Africa, where contraceptive use has been historically low, the Ouagadougou Partnership has surpassed its goal of reaching 1 million additional users between 2011 and 2015, and is now aiming to reach 2.2 million additional users between 2015 and 2020.
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  14. 14
    372968

    The nutrition MDG indicator: interpreting progress.

    Chhabra R; Rokx C

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2004 May. [64] p. (Health, Nutrition and Population (HNP) Discussion Paper; World Bank Report No. 69106)

    This paper argues for more nuance in the interpretation of progress towards the Nutrition Millennium Development Goal indicator (halving the prevalence of underweight children, under 5 years old, by 2015). Interpretation of a country's performance based on trends alone is ambiguous, and can lead to erroneous prioritization of countries in need of donor assistance. For instance, a country may halve the prevalence by 2015, but will still have unacceptable high malnutrition rates. This paper analyses which countries are showing satisfactory and unsatisfactory progress using the Annual Rate of Change (ARC), and then introduces the World Health Organization-classification of severity of malnutrition in the analysis to provide more nuance. It highlights that a little less than half of the Bank's client population is likely to halve underweight by 2015. Although the paper uses national data only, it flags the risks and recommends that countries take regional disparities into their needs-analysis. The paper also argues for more attention to the other important nutrition indicators, stunting and micronutrient deficiencies, which remain enormous problems, and briefly discusses solutions to reducing underweight malnutrition.
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  15. 15
    372966

    MDGs 4 and 5: maternal and child health/reproductive health in LAC.

    Gordillo-Tobar A

    [Washington, D.C.], World Bank, 2012 Jun. 4 p. (en breve No. 177)

    The Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region fares well on achievement of the MDG targets when compared with other regions, but the region has great disparities between and within countries on these goals. The region is also performing better than the rest of the developing world in relation to child mortality, having achieved more than 70% of the progress needed to reduce under-five mortality by two-thirds. However, LAC still faces serious challenges regarding maternal mortality, achieving good public and individual health and alleviating poverty. For LAC, the MDGs are a historic opportunity to address all forms of inequality and attain the political will needed to achieve these goals. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    340425

    Prevention gap report.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. [286] p.

    Efforts to reach fewer than 500 000 new HIV infections by 2020 are off track. This simple conclusion sits atop a complex and diverse global tapestry. Data from 146 countries show that some have achieved declines in new HIV infections among adults of 50% or more over the last 10 years, while many others have not made measurable progress, and yet others have experienced worrying increases in new HIV infections.
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  17. 17
    340415

    Marketing of breast-milk substitutes: National implementation of the international code. Status report 2016.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF; International Baby Food Action Network [IBFAN]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [74] p.

    This report provides updated information on the status of implementing the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes and subsequent relevant World Health Assembly resolutions (“the Code”) in and by countries. It presents the legal status of the Code, including -- where such information is available -- to what extent Code provisions have been incorporated in national legal measures. The report also provides information on the efforts made by countries to monitor and enforce the Code through the establishment of formal mechanisms. Its findings and subsequent recommendations aim to improve the understanding of how countries are implementing the Code, what challenges they face in doing so, and where the focus must be on further efforts to assist them in more effective Code implementation.
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  18. 18
    340372

    90-90-90. On the right track towards the global target.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. [62] p.

    This report highlights best practices and provides examples of countries that are already coming close to achieving the 90–90–90 targets, which are that 90% of people living with HIV know their HIV status, 90% of people who know their HIV-positive status are accessing treatment and 90% of people on treatment have suppressed viral loads. The report outlines steps that are needed to expedite gains towards each of the three 90s. Technological and service delivery innovations rapidly need to be brought to scale, communities must be empowered to lead the push to end the epidemic, new resources must be mobilized to reach the final mile of the response to HIV and steps must urgently be taken to eliminate social and structural barriers to service access.
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  19. 19
    340368

    The state of the world's children 2016. A fair chance for every child.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2016 Jun. [184] p.

    Every child has the right to health, education and protection, and every society has a stake in expanding children’s opportunities in life. Yet, around the world, millions of children are denied a fair chance for no reason other than the country, gender or circumstances into which they are born. The State of the World’s Children 2016 argues that progress for the most disadvantaged children is not only a moral, but also a strategic imperative. Stakeholders have a clear choice to make: invest in accelerated progress for the children being left behind, or face the consequences of a far more divided world by 2030. At the start of a new development agenda, the report concludes with a set of recommendations to help chart the course towards a more equitable world.
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  20. 20
    340297

    On the fast track to ending the AIDS epidemic. Report of the Secretary-General.

    United Nations. Secretary-General

    [New York, New York], United Nations General Assembly, 2016 Apr 1. [31] p. (A/70/811)

    This new report warns that the AIDS epidemic could be prolonged indefinitely if urgent action is not implemented within the next five years. The report reveals that the extraordinary acceleration of progress made over the past 15 years could be lost and urges all partners to concentrate their efforts to increase and front-load investments to ensure that the global AIDS epidemic is ended as a public health threat by 2030. The review of progress looks at the gains made, particularly since the 2011 United Nations Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS, which accelerated action by uniting the world around a set of ambitious targets for 2015. The report outlines that the rapid treatment scale-up has been a major contributing factor to the 42% decline in AIDS-related deaths since the peak in 2004 and notes that this has caused life expectancy in the countries most affected by HIV to rise sharply in recent years. The report underlines the critical role civil society has played in securing many of the gains made and the leadership provided by people living with HIV. Community efforts have been key to removing many of the obstacles faced in scaling up the AIDS response, including reaching people at risk of HIV infection with HIV services, helping people to adhere to treatment and reinforcing other essential health services.
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  21. 21
    368337

    Levels and trends in child mortality. Estimates developed by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (IGME). Report 2015.

    You D; Hug L; Ejdemyr S; Beise J

    New York, New York, United Nations Children's Fund [UNICEF], 2015. 36 p.

    Child mortality is a core indicator for child health and well-being. In 2000, world leaders agreed on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and called for reducing the under-five mortality rate by two thirds between 1990 and 2015 - known as the MDG 4 target. In recent years, the Global Strategy for Women's and Children’s Health launched by United Nations Secretary- General Ban Ki-moon and the Every WomanEvery Child movement boosted global momentum in improving newborn and child survival as well as maternal health. In June 2012, world leaders renewed their commitment during the global launch of Committing to Child Survival: A Promise Renewed, aiming for a continued post-2015 focus to end preventable child deaths. With the end of the MDG era, the international community is in the process of agreeing on a new framework - the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The proposed SDG target for child mortality represents a renewed commitment to the world's children: By 2030, end preventable deathsof newborns and children under five years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 deaths per 1,000 live births and under-five mortality to at least as low as 25 deaths per 1,000 live births.
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  22. 22
    367526
    Peer Reviewed

    Global, regional, and national levels and trends in maternal mortality between 1990 and 2015, with scenario-based projections to 2030: a systematic analysis by the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group.

    Alkema L; Chou D; Hogan D; Zhang S; Moller AB; Gemmill A; Fat DM; Boerma T; Temmerman M; Mathers C; Say L

    Lancet. 2016 Jan 30; 387(10017):462-74.

    BACKGROUND: Millennium Development Goal 5 calls for a 75% reduction in the maternal mortality ratio (MMR) between 1990 and 2015. We estimated levels and trends in maternal mortality for 183 countries to assess progress made. Based on MMR estimates for 2015, we constructed projections to show the requirements for the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of less than 70 maternal deaths per 100,000 livebirths globally by 2030. METHODS: We updated the UN Maternal Mortality Estimation Inter-Agency Group (MMEIG) database with more than 200 additional records (vital statistics from civil registration systems, surveys, studies, or reports). We generated estimates of maternal mortality and related indicators with 80% uncertainty intervals (UIs) using a Bayesian model. The model combines the rate of change implied by a multilevel regression model with a time-series model to capture data-driven changes in country-specific MMRs, and includes a data model to adjust for systematic and random errors associated with different data sources. RESULTS: We had data for 171 of 183 countries. The global MMR fell from 385 deaths per 100,000 livebirths (80% UI 359-427) in 1990, to 216 (207-249) in 2015, corresponding to a relative decline of 43.9% (34.0-48.7), with 303,000 (291,000-349,000) maternal deaths worldwide in 2015. Regional progress in reducing the MMR since 1990 ranged from an annual rate of reduction of 1.8% (0.0-3.1) in the Caribbean to 5.0% (4.0-6.0) in eastern Asia. Regional MMRs for 2015 ranged from 12 deaths per 100,000 livebirths (11-14) for high-income regions to 546 (511-652) for sub-Saharan Africa. Accelerated progress will be needed to achieve the SDG goal; countries will need to reduce their MMRs at an annual rate of reduction of at least 7.5%. INTERPRETATION: Despite global progress in reducing maternal mortality, immediate action is needed to meet the ambitious SDG 2030 target, and ultimately eliminate preventable maternal mortality. Although the rates of reduction that are needed to achieve country-specific SDG targets are ambitious for most high mortality countries, countries that made a concerted effort to reduce maternal mortality between 2000 and 2010 provide inspiration and guidance on how to accomplish the acceleration necessary to substantially reduce preventable maternal deaths. FUNDING: National University of Singapore, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, USAID, and the UNDP/UNFPA/UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Copyright (c) 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.
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  23. 23
    340822

    AIDS by the numbers, 2015.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2015. [12] p.

    This document, released on the World AIDS Day 2015, provides an update on the global status of the HIV epidemic. According to the press release, the epidemic has been forced into decline. New HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths have fallen dramatically since the peak of the epidemic. The document cites a 35 percent decrease in new HIV infections; a 42 percent decrease in AIDS-related deaths since the peak in 2004; a 58 percent decrease in new HIV infections among children since 2000; and an 84 percent increase in access to antiretroviral therapy since 2010. Additionally, the global response to HIV has averted 30 million new HIV infections and 7.8 million AIDS-related deaths since 2000. While acknowledging these achievements, the report also emphasizes that accelerating the AIDS response in low-and middle-income countries could avert 28 million new HIV infections and 21 million AIDS-related deaths between 2015 and 2030, saving US$24 billion annually in additional HIV treatment costs. The next phase of the global response must accommodate new circumstances, opportunities, and evidence, including a rapidly shifting context and a new, sustainable development agenda. The single priority of the HIV response for the next 15 years is to end the epidemic by 2030.
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  24. 24
    340742

    Health in 2015: From MDGs, Millennium Development Goals to SDGs, Sustainable Development Goals.

    Boerma T; Mathers C; AbouZahr C; Chatterji S; Hogan D; Stevens G; Mahanani WR; Ho J; Rusciano F; Humphreys G

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2015. [216] p.

    In 2015 the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) come to the end of their term, and a post-2015 agenda, comprising 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), takes their place. This WHO report looks back 15 years at the trends and positive forces during the MDG era and assesses the main challenges that will affect health in the coming 15 years.
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  25. 25
    337993

    Committing to child survival: a promise renewed. Progress report 2015.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2015. [99] p.

    This report from A Promise Renewed – a global partnership initiative aimed at ending preventable child and maternal deaths – features updates and analyses of global, regional and national child mortality levels and trends. It also provides current information on causes of child and maternal deaths, and coverage of key interventions to prevent them, as well as projections for the 2015-2030 period. The report highlights impressive progress towards our commitment to increase child survival during the Millennium Development Goals era, which has saved the lives of some 48 million children under the age of 5 since 2000. Finally, it calls for intensified action in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals.
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