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Your search found 12 Results

  1. 1
    375724

    Adolescent girls in disaster and conflict. Interventions for improving access to sexual and reproductive health services.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2016. 92 p.

    Safe spaces, mobile medical teams and youth engagement are effective ways to reach displaced, uprooted, crisis-affected girls at a critical time in their young lives. Adolescent Girls in Disaster & Conflict: Interventions for Improving Access to Sexual and Reproductive Health Services is a collection of UNFPA-supported humanitarian interventions for reaching adolescents when crisis heightens vulnerability to gender-based violence, unwanted pregnancy, HIV infection, early and forced marriage and other risks.
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  2. 2
    374445

    Male engagement in the HIV response — a platform for action.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. 12 p.

    Gender inequalities and harmful gender norms are important drivers of the HIV epidemic, and they are major hindrances to an effective HIV response. While access to HIV services for women and girls remain a concern, a growing body of evidence also shows that men and adolescent boys have limited access to HIV services. Current effort to advance both gender equality and sexual and reproductive health and rights as key elements of the HIV response do not adequately reflect the ways that harmful gender norms and practices negatively affect men, women and adolescent body and girls in all their diversity. This in turn increases HIV-related vulnerability and risk among all of these groups.
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  3. 3
    377140
    Peer Reviewed

    Projected Uptake of New Antiretroviral (ARV) Medicines in Adults in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Forecast Analysis 2015-2025.

    Gupta A; Juneja S; Vitoria M; Habiyambere V; Nguimfack BD; Doherty M; Low-Beer D

    PloS One. 2016; 11(10):e0164619.

    With anti-retroviral treatment (ART) scale-up set to continue over the next few years it is of key importance that manufacturers and planners in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV/AIDS pandemic are able to anticipate and respond to future changes to treatment regimens, generics pipeline and demand, in order to secure continued access to all ARV medicines required. We did a forecast analysis, using secondary WHO and UNAIDS data sources, to estimate the number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) and the market share and demand for a range of new and existing ARV drugs in LMICs up to 2025. UNAIDS estimates 24.7 million person-years of ART in 2020 and 28.5 million person-years of ART in 2025 (24.3 million on first-line treatment, 3.5 million on second-line treatment, and 0.6 million on third-line treatment). Our analysis showed that TAF and DTG will be major players in the ART regimen by 2025, with 8 million and 15 million patients using these ARVs respectively. However, as safety and efficacy of dolutegravir (DTG) and tenofovir alafenamide (TAF) during pregnancy and among TB/HIV co-infected patients using rifampicin is still under debate, and ART scale-up is predicted to increase considerably, there also remains a clear need for continuous supplies of existing ARVs including TDF and EFV, which 16 million and 10 million patients-respectively-are predicted to be using in 2025. It will be important to ensure that the existing capacities of generics manufacturers, which are geared towards ARVs of higher doses (such as TDF 300mg and EFV 600mg), will not be adversely impacted due to the introduction of lower dose ARVs such as TAF 25mg and DTG 50mg. With increased access to viral load testing, more patients would be using protease inhibitors containing regimens in second-line, with 1 million patients on LPV/r and 2.3 million on ATV/r by 2025. However, it will remain important to continue monitoring the evolution of ARV market in LMICs to guarantee the availability of these medicines.
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  4. 4
    377078
    Peer Reviewed

    Assessing the availability of LLINs for continuous distribution through routine antenatal care and the Expanded Programme on Immunizations in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Theiss-Nyland K; Lynch M; Lines J

    Malaria Journal. 2016 May 04; 15(1):255.

    BACKGROUND: In addition to mass distribution campaigns, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the continuous distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) to all pregnant women attending antenatal care (ANC) and all infants attending the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) services in countries implementing mosquito nets for malaria control. Countries report LLIN distribution data to the WHO annually. For this analysis, these data were used to assess policy and practice in implementing these recommendations and to compare the numbers of LLINs available through ANC and EPI services with the numbers of women and children attending these services. METHODS: For each reporting country in sub-Saharan Africa, the presence of a reported policy for LLIN distribution through ANC and EPI was reviewed. Prior to inclusion in the analysis the completeness of data was assessed in terms of the numbers of LLINs distributed through all channels (campaigns, EPI, ANC, other). For each country with adequate data, the numbers of LLINs reportedly distributed by national programmes to ANC was compared to the number of women reportedly attending ANC at least once; the ratio between these two numbers was used as an indicator of LLIN availability at ANC services. The same calculations were repeated for LLINs distributed through EPI to produce the corresponding LLIN availability through this distribution channel. RESULTS: Among 48 malaria-endemic countries in Africa, 33 malaria programmes reported adopting policies of ANC-based continuous distribution of LLINs, and 25 reported adopting policies of EPI-based distribution. Over a 3-year period through 2012, distribution through ANC accounted for 9 % of LLINs distributed, and LLINs distributed through EPI accounted for 4 %. The LLIN availability ratios achieved were 55 % through ANC and 34 % through EPI. For 38 country programmes reporting on LLIN distribution, data to calculate LLIN availability through ANC and EPI was available for 17 and 16, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These continuous LLIN distribution channels appear to be under-utilized, especially EPI-based distribution. However, quality data from more countries are needed for consistent and reliable programme performance monitoring. A greater focus on routine data collection, monitoring and reporting on LLINs distributed through both ANC and EPI can provide insight into both strengths and weaknesses of continuous distribution, and improve the effectiveness of these delivery channels.
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  5. 5
    376183
    Peer Reviewed

    Worldwide drop in maternal mortality.

    Duff E

    Midwifery. 2016 Feb; 33:7.

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  6. 6
    374002
    Peer Reviewed

    Development, updates, and future directions of the World Health Organization Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use.

    Chen MJ; Kim CR; Whitehouse KC; Berry-Bibee E; Gaffield ME

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2016 Dec 13; 7 p.

    Correct and consistent use of contraception decreases the risk of unintended pregnancy; yet, outdated policies or practices can delay initiation or hinder continuation of contraceptive methods. To promote the quality of, and access to, family planning services, WHO created a series of evidence-based guidance documents for family planning, known as WHO's Four Cornerstones of Family Planning Guidance. The Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC), first published in 1996, provides guidance on the safety of various contraceptive methods in users with specific health conditions or characteristics (i.e. who can use a contraceptive method safely). The Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use (SPR) is the second cornerstone, outlining how to safely and effectively use contraceptive methods. These two documents can serve as a reference for policymakers and program managers as they develop their own national family planning policies in the context of local needs, values, and resources. The two other cornerstone documents -- the Decision making tool for family planning clients and providers and Family planning: a global handbook for providers -- provide guidance to healthcare providers for applying these recommendations in practice. Between 2013 and 2014, WHO convened a Guideline Development Group (GDG) to review and update the MEC and SPR in line with current evidence. As a result of these meetings, the fifth edition of the MEC was published in 2015, and the third edition of the SPR will be released on December 14, 2016. The purpose of the present report is to describe the methods used to develop the SPR recommendations, research gaps identified during the guideline development process, and future directions for the dissemination and implementation of the SPR among policymakers and family planning program managers worldwide. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    370002

    FP2020 momentum at the midpoint 2015-2016.

    Scoggins S; Bremner J

    [Washington, D.C.], FP2020, 2016. 139 p.

    This report marks the halfway point of the FP2020 initiative, and reflects the substantial progress made to date: 1) There are now more than 300 million women and girls using modern contraception in the world’s 69 poorest countries—a milestone that has taken decades to achieve. 2) More than 30 million of those users have been added since 2012, when FP2020 was launched. 3) In Eastern and Southern Africa, for the first time ever, more than 30% of women and girls are using a modern method of contraception. 4) In West Africa, where contraceptive use has been historically low, the Ouagadougou Partnership has surpassed its goal of reaching 1 million additional users between 2011 and 2015, and is now aiming to reach 2.2 million additional users between 2015 and 2020.
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  8. 8
    372762

    Evaluation of the UNFPA support to family planning 2008-2013. Volume II - Annexes.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, Evaluation Office, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2016 Apr. 214 p.

    The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the performance of UNFPA in the field of family planning during the period covered by the Strategic Plan 2008-2013 and to provide learning to inform the implementation of the current UNFPA Family Planning Strategy Choices not chance (2012-2020). The evaluation provided an overall independent assessment of UNFPA interventions in the area of family planning and identified key lessons learned for the current and future strategies. The particular emphasis of this evaluation was on learning with a view to informing the implementation of the UNFPA family planning strategy Choices not chance 2012-2020, as well as other related interventions and programmes, such as the Global Programme to Enhance Reproductive Health Commodity Security (GPRHCS- 2013-2020). The evaluation constituted an important contribution to the mid-term review of UNFPA strategic plan 2014-2017. The evaluation features five country case study reports: Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe.
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  9. 9
    370754
    Peer Reviewed

    How should the post-2015 response to AIDS relate to the drive for universal health coverage?

    Poku NK

    Global Public Health. 2016 Aug 6; 1-15.

    The drive for universal health coverage (UHC) now has a great deal of normative impetus, and in combination with the inauguration of the sustainable development goals, has come to be regarded as a means of ensuring the financial basis for the struggle against HIV and AIDS. The argument of this paper is that such thinking is a case of ‘the right thing at the wrong time’: it seriously underestimates the scale of the work against HIV and AIDS, and the speed with which we need to undertake it, if we are to consolidate the gains we have made to date, let alone reduce it to manageable proportions. The looming ‘fiscal crunch’ makes the challenges all the more daunting; even in the best circumstances, the time required to establish UHCs capable of providing both essential health services and a very rapid scale-up of the fight against HIV and AIDS is insufficient when set against the urgency of ensuring that AIDS does not eventuate as a global health catastrophe.
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  10. 10
    340408

    mHealth: Use of mobile wireless technologies for public health. Report by the Secretariat.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Secretariat

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2016 May 27. [4] p. (EB139/8)

    WHO has issued a report that is strongly supportive of mHealth. New priorities for WHO in the area of mHealth include: to support and strengthen ongoing efforts to build evidence-based guidance on the use of mHealth in order to advance integrated person-centred health services and universal health coverage; to provide guidance on mHealth adoption, management and evaluation in order to aid good governance and investment decisions. These could include guidance to inform the development of national programmes and strategies, and the development of standard operating procedures; to work with Member States and partners to build platforms for sharing evidence, experience and good practices in mHealth implementation as a way to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. These could include building on existing networks to create regional hubs of knowledge and excellence on mHealth; to support building capacity and the empowerment of health workers and their beneficiary populations to use information and communication technologies, in order to foster their engagement and accountability, and to catalyse and monitor progress on specific Sustainable Development Goals using mHealth.
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  11. 11
    340304

    World health statistics 2016. Monitoring health for the SDGs, Sustainable Development Goals.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO , 2016. [136] p.

    The World Health Statistics series is WHO’s annual compilation of health statistics for its 194 Member States. World Health Statistics 2016 focuses on the proposed health and health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and associated targets. It represents an initial effort to bring together available data on SDG health and health-related indicators. In the current absence of official goal-level indicators, summary measures of health such as (healthy) life expectancy are used to provide a general assessment of the situation.
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  12. 12
    340297

    On the fast track to ending the AIDS epidemic. Report of the Secretary-General.

    United Nations. Secretary-General

    [New York, New York], United Nations General Assembly, 2016 Apr 1. [31] p. (A/70/811)

    This new report warns that the AIDS epidemic could be prolonged indefinitely if urgent action is not implemented within the next five years. The report reveals that the extraordinary acceleration of progress made over the past 15 years could be lost and urges all partners to concentrate their efforts to increase and front-load investments to ensure that the global AIDS epidemic is ended as a public health threat by 2030. The review of progress looks at the gains made, particularly since the 2011 United Nations Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS, which accelerated action by uniting the world around a set of ambitious targets for 2015. The report outlines that the rapid treatment scale-up has been a major contributing factor to the 42% decline in AIDS-related deaths since the peak in 2004 and notes that this has caused life expectancy in the countries most affected by HIV to rise sharply in recent years. The report underlines the critical role civil society has played in securing many of the gains made and the leadership provided by people living with HIV. Community efforts have been key to removing many of the obstacles faced in scaling up the AIDS response, including reaching people at risk of HIV infection with HIV services, helping people to adhere to treatment and reinforcing other essential health services.
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