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Your search found 13 Results

  1. 1
    334801

    Keys to youth-friendly services: Ensuring confidentiality.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2011 Mar. [8] p.

    Confidentiality is crucial in the provision of youth friendly services. Privacy and confidentiality are distinct concepts. Confidentiality ensures privacy. The promotion of young people's sexual and reproductive health can only be achieved through providing confidential services that encourage them to seek preventative care and counselling.
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  2. 2
    334800

    Keys to youth-friendly services: Celebrating diversity.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2011 Oct. [12] p.

    Young people are not a single homogenous group, but a diverse population whose sexual and reproductive health needs are complex, shifting and varied. Youth-friendly service delivery should be based on an understanding of and respect for each person's unique social, cultural and economic identity.
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  3. 3
    333472

    Preventing early pregnancy: What the evidence says.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Family Care International

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, [2011]. [8] p.

    The Preventing early pregnancy: What the evidence says? in Developing Countries presents the evidence to design national policies and strategies. It contains recommendations on action and research for preventing: (1) early pregnancy: by preventing marriage before 18 years of age; by increasing knowledge and understanding of the importance of pregnancy prevention; by increasing the use of contraception; and by preventing coerced sex; (2) poor reproductive outcomes: by reducing unsafe abortions; and by increasing the use of skilled antenatal, childbirth and postnatal care. These guidelines are primarily intended for policy-makers, planners and programme managers from governments, nongovernmental organizations and development agencies. They are also likely to be of interest to public health researchers and practitioners, professional associations and civil society groups. They have been developed through a systematic review of existing research and input from experts from countries around the world, in partnership with many key international organizations working to improve adolescents’ health. Similar partnerships have been forged to distribute them widely and to support their use. (Excerpt)
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  4. 4
    333446

    Ten targets: 2011 United Nations General Assembly Political Declaration on HIV / AIDS: Targets and elimination commitments.

    United Nations. General Assembly

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [3] p.

    Ten targets in the campaign to achieve universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support by 2015 are listed. Targets include: Reduce sexual transmission of HIV by 50% by 2015; Reduce transmission of HIV among people who inject drugs by 50% by 2015; Eliminate new HIV infections among children by 2015 and substantially reduce AIDS-related maternal deaths; Reach 15 million people living with HIV with lifesaving antiretroviral treatment by 2015; Reduce tuberculosis deaths in people living with HIV by 50 percent by 2015; Close the global AIDS resource gap by 2015 and reach annual global investment of US$22-24 billion in low- and middle-income countries; Eliminate gender inequalities and gender-based abuse and violence and increase the capacity of women and girls to protect themselves from HIV; Eliminate stigma and discrimination against people living with and affected by HIV through promotion of laws and policies that ensure the full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms; Eliminate HIV-related restrictions on entry, stay and residence; Eliminate parallel systems for HIV-related services to strengthen integration of the AIDS response in global health and development efforts.
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  5. 5
    333445

    World AIDS Day report, 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [52] p.

    A new report by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS (UNAIDS), released on 21 November, shows that 2011 was a game changing year for the AIDS response with unprecedented progress in science, political leadership and results. The report also shows that new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths have fallen to the lowest levels since the peak of the epidemic.
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  6. 6
    333447

    UNAIDS data tables, 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [36] p.

    The data tables describe in greater detail the progress being made against the HIV epidemic and the main challenges to achieving zero HIV infections and zero AIDS deaths. The data are drawn from country progress reports and will be updated regularly. This document reflects information found in the publication “Global HIV / AIDS response: epidemic update and health sector progress towards universal access: progress report 2011", by UNAIDS, UNICEF and WHO.
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  7. 7
    333444

    Global HIV / AIDS response. Epidemic update and health sector progress towards Universal Access. Progress report 2011.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2011. [229] p.

    The Progress report 2011: Global HIV / AIDS response reviews progress made until the end of 2010 in scaling up access to health sector interventions for HIV prevention, treatment, care and support in low– and middle-income countries. It is the fifth in a series of annual progress reports published since 2006 by WHO, UNICEF and UNAIDS, in collaboration with national and international partners, to monitor key components of the health sector response to the HIV epidemic. The key findings of the report: update on the HIV epidemic; selected health sector interventions for HIV prevention; knowledge of HIV status, scaling up treatment and care for people living with HIV; scaling up services for key populations at higher risk of HIV infection; scaling up HIV services for women and children; towards elimination of mother to child transmission and improving maternal and child health in the context of HIV.
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  8. 8
    333333

    Outlook 30. UNAIDS outlook report 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [236] p.

    30 years into the AIDS epidemic, 30 milestones, thoughts, images, words, artworks, breakthroughs, inspirations, and ideas in response.
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  9. 9
    333332

    Global Plan towards the Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive. 2011-2015.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [48] p. (UNAIDS/ JC2137E)

    This Global Plan provides the foundation for country-led movement towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children and keeping their mothers alive. The Global Plan was developed through a consultative process by a high level Global Task Team convened by UNAIDS. It brought together 25 countries and 30 civil society, private sector, networks of people living with HIV and international organizations to chart a roadmap to achieving this goal by 2015.
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  10. 10
    333326

    The Treatment 2.0 Framework for Action: Catalysing the next phase of treatment, care and support.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2011. [32] p.

    In June 2010, the UNAIDS Secretariat and WHO launched Treatment 2.0, an initiative designed to achieve and sustain universal access and maximize the preventive benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Treatment 2.0 builds on '3 by 5' and the programmatic and clinical evidence and experience over the last 10 years to expand access to HIV diagnosis, treatment and care through a series of innovations in five priority work areas: drugs, diagnostics, costs, service delivery and community mobilization. The principles and priorities of Treatment 2.0 address the need for innovation and efficiency gains in HIV programmes, in greater effectiveness, intervention coverage and impact in terms of both HIV-specific and broader health outcomes. Since the launch of Treatment 2.0, the UNAIDS Secretariat and WHO have worked with other UNAIDS co-sponsoring organizations, technical experts and global partners to further elaborate and begin implementing Treatment 2.0. The Treatment 2.0 Framework for Action outlines the five priority work areas which comprise the core elements of the initiative and establishes a strategic framework to guide action within each of them over the next decade. The Framework for Action reflects commitments outlined in Getting to Zero: 2011 - 2015 Strategy, UNAIDS and the WHO Global Health-Sector Strategy on HIV, 2011 - 2015, the guiding strategies for the multi-sectoral and health-sector responses to the HIV pandemic. (Excerpt)
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  11. 11
    333309

    Millennium Development Goal 8, The Global Partnership for Development: Time to deliver. MDG Gap Task Force Report 2011.

    United Nations. MDG Gap Task Force

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2011. [98] p.

    The objective of MDG 8 is to assist all developing countries in achieving the goals through a strengthened global partnership for international development cooperation. The present report describes how that partnership is producing significant results on many fronts, but notes that many important gaps between expectations and delivery remain. (Excerpt)
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  12. 12
    333229

    Universal access to reproductive health. Accelerated actions to enhance progress on Millennium Development Goal 5 through advancing Target 5B.

    Say L; Chou D

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2011. [36] p. (WHO/RHR/HRP/11.02)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Department of Reproductive Health and Research convened a technical consultation involving stakeholders from countries, regions and partner agencies to review strategies applied within countries for advancing universal access to sexual and reproductive health with a view to identifying strategic approaches to accelerate progress in achieving universal access. Case-studies from seven countries (Brazil, Cambodia, India, Morocco, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan and Zambia) illustrating application of a variety of strategies to improve access to sexual and reproductive health, lessons learnt during implementation and results achieved, allows identification of a range of actions for accelerated progress in universal access. In order to achieve MDG 5 a holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health is necessary, such that programmes and initiatives will need to expand beyond focusing only on maternal health and address also family planning, sexual health and prevention of unsafe abortion. Programmes should prioritize areas of engagement based upon country and regional needs while establishing practical ways to ensure equity through integration of gender and human rights. The strategic actions in countries outlined here will help accelerate progress towards attainment of MDG Target 5B within the wider context of implementation of the WHO Global reproductive health strategy. (Excerpt)
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  13. 13
    332957

    The USAID | DELIVER project improves patient access to essential medicines in Zambia. Success story.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, 2011 Feb. [2] p.

    Success story on a logistics system pilot project in Zambia that set out to cost-effectively improve the availability of lifesaving drugs and other essential products at health facilities.
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