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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    381666
    Peer Reviewed

    Quality maternal and newborn care to ensure a healthy start for every newborn in the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region.

    Obara H; Sobel H

    BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2014 Sep; 121 Suppl 4:154-9.

    In the World Health Organization Western Pacific Region, the high rates of births attended by skilled health personnel (SHP) do not equal access to quality maternal or newborn care. 'A healthy start for every newborn' for 23 million annual births in the region means that SHP and newborn care providers give quality intrapartum, postpartum and newborn care. WHO and the UNICEF Regional Action Plan for Healthy Newborn Infants provide a platform for countries to scale-up Early Essential Newborn Care (EENC). The plan emphasises the creation of an enabling environment for the practice of EENC; thereby, preventing 50,000 newborn deaths annually. (c) 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.
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  2. 2
    320241

    UNAIDS and WHO Consultation on Progress in Prevention and Care in the Context of the "3 By 5 Initiative" and the Perspective of Universal Access in the Western Pacific Region, 12-16 December 2005, Manila, Philippines. Report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Manila, Philippines. WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, [2006]. [44] p. ((WP)HSI/ICP/HSI/3.5/001; Report Series No. RS/2005/GE/45(PHL))

    The WHO Western Pacific Regional Office, in collaboration with the Joint United Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), organized the four-day UNAIDS and WHO Consultation on Progress in Prevention and Care in the Context of the "3 by 5" Initiative and the Perspective of Universal Access in the Western Pacific Region with the general objective that, by the end of the consultation, the participants would have: (1) reviewed progress made on prevention and care scale-up in the context of the "3 by 5" Initiative; (2) shared experiences among countries on the current performance of monitoring and evaluation systems related to HIV/AIDS care, treatment and support: (3) identified ways to strengthen the integration of HIV/AIDS prevention and care: and (4) defined the conditions and terms of reference of a partners technical working group on HIV/AIDS prevention and care scale-up in the Western Pacific Region. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    282180

    Reaching the poor: challenges for the TB programmes in the Western Pacific Region.

    Coll-Black S; Van Maaren P; Ahn D; Kasai T; Bhushan A

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Stop TB, 2004. [41] p.

    Globally, over 98% of the deaths caused by tuberculosis (TB) annually are in developing countries. Within the Western Pacific Region, the seven countries that account for 94% of the TB prevalence are low or lower middle-income economies. Within countries, as well, poor and marginalized communities suffer disproportionately from TB. Importantly, TB affects the most economically and socially productive age group, as 77% of TB deaths occur within the ages of 15 – 54. This evidence points to the important relationship between poverty and TB. The deprivation associated with poverty, such as overcrowding, poor ventilation and malnutrition, increases the rate of transmission and progression from infection to disease. In turn, the costs of TB can further impoverish poor households. This is because poor households must dedicate a larger proportion of their income to meet the direct and indirect costs of seeking TB care than the non-poor. The opportunity costs are likewise higher for the poor than non-poor. For the poor, a decrease in productivity or an increase in time away from work because of illness leads to a reduction in income. Moreover, coping mechanisms employed by poor households during periods of illness may reduce household productivity in the long-term. TB has important social costs as well, which are more likely to affect women with TB than men. For example, stigma and isolation resulting from TB can reduce an individual's social position. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    059776

    A simple cure for diarrhoea.

    Borra A

    WORLD HEALTH. 1989 Nov; 14-5.

    Diarrheal diseases continue to be the major causes of death for children in 4 Western Pacific Region nations: the Lao People's Democratic Republic, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, and Viet Nam. They are also among the most frequent childhood illnesses in 18 of 35 countries and areas of the region. Many children die because physicians, health workers, and mothers do not know that oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is the single most effective treatment for diarrhea. All too often, older or hospital based physicians prescribe antidiarrheal drugs or antibiotics. ORT can successfully treat 90-95% of acute diarrheal cases. The oral rehydration salts (salt, glucose, sodium bicarbonate, and potassium chloride) are mixed with potable water so the child with diarrhea can drink it. The mixture replaces the water and salts removed from the body during diarrheal episodes. The 1st Diarrhoeal Training Unit (DTU) of the WHO Global Diarrhoeal Diseases Control programme in the region was found in Manila, the Philippines in December 1985. Its purpose continues to be the provision of hands-on training for health professionals in hospitals to convince them that ORT is effective. In 1988, 12 DTUs existed in such countries as China, the Lao People's Democratic Republic, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, and Viet Nam. They will soon also operate out of medical, nursing, and midwifery schools. Even though 60% of the population in the Western Pacific Region has access to ORT packets, too many mothers still do no use them to treat their children with diarrhea. Further, they do not know that they should continue to feed them. In 1988 in the region, an estimated 50,000 children lived who would have died without ORT.
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