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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    332101

    Affordable Medicines Facility - Malaria. Frequently asked questions.

    Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

    [Geneva, Switzerland], Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, 2010 Jan 12. 17 p.

    The AMFm is an innovative financing mechanism to expand access to affordable artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) for malaria, thereby saving lives and reducing the use of inappropriate treatments. The AMFm aims to enable countries to increase the provision of affordable ACTs through the public, private not-for-profit (e.g. NGO) and private for-profit sectors. By increasing access to ACTs and displacing artemisinin monotherapies from the market, the AMFm also seeks to delay resistance to the active pharmaceutical ingredient, artemisinin.
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  2. 2
    309713

    HIV and AIDS treatment education: a critical component of efforts to ensure universal access to prevention, treatment and care. UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education.

    Sass J; Castle C

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 Jun. 50 p. (ED.2006/WS/11309713)

    This paper explores some of the issues contained within the definition of treatment education, signalling ways that the education sector can play a role along with others engaged in treatment access and education. It considers some key strategies, including how to effectively engage and prepare communities and how to involve key constituencies, particularly people with HIV and those on treatment. Moreover, the paper reexamines the harmful effects of stigma and discrimination and how these impede progress in prevention as well as expanded treatment access. The paper also suggests some possible future directions, underscoring areas of particular priority. These include the need for: Identification, documentation and wide dissemination of effective approaches to treatment education that are feasible, sustainable and that can be scaled up; Development of practical guidelines and materials that can be used by programme implementers to support the integration of treatment education within ongoing HIV and AIDS education efforts; Ongoing and close communication with authorities and organizations responsible for expanding treatment access to ensure coherent and well-coordinated programming. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    299619
    Peer Reviewed

    Acess to AIDS medicines stumbles on trade rules.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2006 May; 84(5):337-424.

    Developing countries are failing to make full use of flexibilities built into the World Trade Organization's (WTO) Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) to overcome patent barriers and, in turn, allow them to acquire the medicines they need for high priority diseases, in particular, HIV/AIDS. First-line antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for HIV/AIDS have become more affordable and available in recent years, but for patients facing drug resistance and side-effects, second-line ARV drugs and other newer formulations are likely to remain prohibitively expensive and inaccessible in many countries. The problem is that many of these countries are not using all the tools at their disposal to overcome these barriers. Medicines protected by patents tend to be expensive, as pharmaceutical companies try to recoup their research and development (R&D) costs. When there is generic competition prices can be driven down dramatically. The TRIPS Agreement came into effect on 1 January 1995 setting out minimum standards for the protection of intellectual property, including patents on pharmaceuticals. Under that agreement, since 2005 new drugs may be subject to at least 20 years of patent protection in all, apart from in the least-developed countries and a few non-WTO Members, such as Somalia. Successful AIDS programmes, such as those in Brazil and Thailand, have only been possible because key pharmaceuticals were not patent protected and could be produced locally at much lower cost. For example, when the Brazilian Government began producing generic AIDS drugs in 2000, prices dropped. AIDS triple-combination therapy, which costs US$ 10 000 per patient per year in industrialized countries, can now be obtained from Indian generic drugs company, Cipla, for less than US$ 200 per year. This puts ARV treatment within reach of many more people. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    292236

    AIDS Medicines and Diagnostics Service (AMDS).

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS / AMDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005. [2] p.

    AIDS Medicines and Diagnostics Service is a network that aims to increase access to good quality and effective treatments for HIV/AIDS by improving supply of antiretroviral medicines and diagnostics in developing countries. Goals: To ensure that the supply of quality commodities is never an obstacle to expanding treatment, care and support; To use improved commodity supply to catalyze rapid expansion of treatment, to promote equity, and to support prevention. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    192045

    Accelerating Access Initiative. Widening access to care and support for people living with HIV / AIDS. Progress report, June 2002.

    Samb B; Perriëns J; Tracey H; Fleet J

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2002. [35] p.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) and Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimate that in 2001 about 3 million people died from AIDS, with the vast majority of these deaths occurring in developing countries. While the availability of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has significantly reduced AIDS morbidity and mortality in the industrialized world, in developing countries, where 95% of HIVpositive people live, the overwhelming majority of HIV-positive people do not have access to these life-sustaining medications. WHO conservatively estimates that in 2002, around 6 million people in developing countries are in need of ARV therapy. Yet only about 230,000 people living with HIV in those countries have such access today. Half of these live in one country, Brazil. Access to medicines is dependent on their rational selection and use, the availability of financial resources, the strength of the health infrastructure and their affordability. As the high cost of medicines is a major factor limiting access to ARVs in developing countries, in May 2000 five UN organizations (the United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], United Nations Children’s Fund [UNICEF], World Health Organization [WHO], World Bank and UNAIDS Secretariat) entered into a partnership offered by five pharmaceutical companies (Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH; Bristol-Myers Squibb; GlaxoSmithKline; Merck & Co., Inc.; and F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. – later joined by Abbott Laboratories) to address the lack of affordability of HIV medicines and to work together to increase access to HIV/AIDS care and treatment in developing countries. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    280223

    Lessons learnt from the UNAIDS pilot programme on access to treatment.

    Southern Africa HIV / AIDS Action. 2003 Jun; (56):10.

    Because Antiretroviral drugs are very expensive and unaffordable most people think that it is not feasible to use antiretrovirals in resource poor settings. However, use of antiretrovirals is feasible in developing countries. This is an important lesson that has been learnt from the pilot phase of the UNAIDS HIV Drug Access Initiative. The Drug Access Initiative (DAI) was launched in November 1997, designed to develop innovative, effective models to improve access to needed drugs to treat HIV and its opportunistic infections. The initial phase of the Initiative has been designed to set up the necessary infrastructure and systems to increase access to HIV related drugs on a small but sustainable scale. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    278182

    WHO initiatives to increase access to treatment in developing countries.

    Elliott R

    Canadian HIV / AIDS Policy and Law Review. 2002 Dec; 7(2-3):57-58.

    In mid-2002, the World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that some six million people with HIV/AIDS in developing countries are currently in need of life-sustaining antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, but that only 230,000 have access to these medicines, half of whom live in one country, Brazil. The WHO believes that, with a concerted international effort to expand access to HIV treatment and care, three million people could have access to ARVs by the end of 2005. A number of recent initiatives provide some useful tools toward reaching this goal. (author's)
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  8. 8
    190685
    Peer Reviewed

    The role of civil society in protecting public health over commercial interests: lessons from Thailand.

    Ford N; Wilson D; Bunjumnong O; von Schoen Angerer T

    Lancet. 2004 Feb 14; 363(9408):560-563.

    In October, 2002, two Thai people with HIV-1 won an important legal case to increase access to medicines. In its judgment in the didanosine patent case against Bristol-Myers Squibb, the Thai Central Intellectual Property and International Trade Court ruled that, because pharmaceutical patents can lead to high prices and limit access to medicines, patients are injured by them and can challenge their legality. This ruling had great international implications for health and human rights, confirming that patients—whose health and lives can depend on being able to afford a medicine—can be considered as damaged parties and therefore have legal standing to sue. The complexities of pharmaceutical intellectual property law are most poorly understood by those most affected by their consequences—the patients who need the drugs. The Thai court case was the outcome of a learning process and years of networking between different civil society actors who joined forces to protect and promote the right of access to treatment. Our Viewpoint, based on key interviews and published reviews, summarises the efforts of civil society in Thailand to achieve a fair balance between international trade and public health. These efforts have focused on didanosine, an essential antiretroviral drug that in Thailand has become symbolic of how multinational companies and governments of industrialised countries protect their own interests at the expense of access to essential medicines for the poor. (author's)
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