Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    331967

    From advocacy to access: Uganda. The power of networks: How do you mobilize funds for reproductive health supplies? Fact chart.

    Reproductive Health Uganda; International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, 2009 Nov. [2] p.

    In Uganda the IPPF Member Association, Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU) coordinated civil society and mobilized advocates and champions to increase the availability of RH supplies and family planning. Results to date include: The Government of Uganda increased funding for RH supplies in the 2010 budget; The Government of Uganda disburses funds directly to the National Medical Stores on an annual basis enabling the bulk purchase of contraceptives; 30 out of 80 districts have committed to increasing their resource allocation for family planning and RH supplies.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    319303

    Better procurement and supply management of HIV / AIDs drugs and supplies.

    Osewe PL; Habiyambere V; Li Bassi L

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Global HIV / AIDS Program, 2005 Dec. 5 p.

    Many countries are working to expand access to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for millions of people with HIV/AIDS. Uninterrupted and timely supplies of safe, effective and affordable ARV drugs are needed. They must be dispensed correctly by health workers, and consistently taken by patients. A partnership between the World Bank and World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM), UNICEF, UNAIDS, and the American and French Governments is helping countries build capacity to procure and manage HIV/AIDS drugs and related supplies. This effort has helped support an increase in the number of people on ARV treatment in low- and middle income countries, from 400,000 at the end of 2003, to about one million in June 2005. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    312468

    Evaluation of WHO's contribution to "3 by 5": main report.

    Battistella Nemes MI; Beaudoin J; Conway S; Kivumbi GW; Skjelmerud A

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006 Mar 30. [133] p.

    This independent formative evaluation was conducted by a team of six international consultants between August 2005 and January 2006 to appraise WHO's contributions and roles in implementing the "3 by 5" Initiative. Funded by the Canadian Government, and as a requirement for its grant to WHO, the evaluation investigated all three levels at which WHO operates (headquarters, regional offices and country offices), placing particular emphasis on Africa. This included seven country assessments and an extensive consultation of international and country-level partners and stakeholders. A number of focused technical studies were also commissioned. The evaluation reviewed how effectively WHO provided technical, managerial and administrative guidance and support pursuant to the "3 by 5" goals and target. An assessment was also made of the extent to which WHO has mobilized, sustained and contributed to this major global partnership through improving harmonization between United Nations agencies and working with other stakeholders and partners. Key lessons from "3 by 5" have been documented, including those on how the initiative contributed to health systems strengthening and HIV prevention, as well as the ways with which equity and gender concerns were dealt. Potential opportunities for future collaboration between WHO, main donors and partners were identified and recommendations have been provided for future plans and the way forward for WHO and its partners. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    281180

    Securing the supplies that people rely on.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [2004]. [2] p.

    As a lead UN agency for reproductive health commodity security, UNFPA tracks and forecasts supply and demand. A combination of factors are creating severe shortages: MORE PEOPLE OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE: More than one billion people are between 15 and 24 years of age. They are entering their reproductive lives as the largest-ever generation of young people. INCREASED DEMAND FOR CONTRACEPTIVES: The number of contraceptive users is projected to increase more than 40 per cent between 2000 and 2015, due to population growth and the success of family planning programmes. Over this same period the cost of quality contraceptives is projected to increase from US $ 810 million to US $ 1.8 billion. INCREASES IN TRANSMISSION OF HIV/AIDS: HIV transmission rates are still on the rise. In a few countries, as many as 40 per cent of all pregnant women are estimated to be infected with HIV. The fact that 75 per cent of infections are acquired through sexual transmission makes condoms essential for HIV prevention. In addition, each year there are some 340 million new cases of other sexually transmitted infections. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    182213
    Peer Reviewed

    Management of severely ill children at first-level health facilities in sub-Saharan Africa when referral is difficult. [La prise en charge au niveau des installations sanitaires de premier niveau des enfants gravement malades, en Afrique sub-saharienne, en cas de difficulté d'orientation vers d'autres structures]

    Simoes EA; Peterson S; Gamatie Y; Kisanga FS; Mukasa G

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2003 Jul; 81(7):522-531.

    Objectives: To quantify the main reasons for referral of infants and children from first-level health facilities to referral hospitals in sub- Saharan Africa and to determine what further supplies, equipment, and legal empowerment might be needed to manage such children when referral is difficult. Methods: In an observational study at first-level health facilities in Uganda, the United Republic of Tanzania, and Niger, over 3–5 months, we prospectively documented the diagnoses and severity of diseases in children using the standardized Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) guidelines. We reviewed the facilities for supplies and equipment and examined the legal constraints of health personnel working at these facilities. Findings: We studied 7195 children aged 2–59 months, of whom 691 (9.6%) were classified under a severe IMCI classification that required urgent referral to a hospital. Overall, 226 children had general danger signs, 292 had severe pneumonia or very severe disease, 104 were severely dehydrated, 31 had severe persistent diarrhoea, 207 were severely malnourished, and 98 had severe anaemia. Considerably more ill were 415 young infants aged one week to two months: nearly three-quarters of these required referral. Legal constraints and a lack of simple equipment (suction pumps, nebulizers, and oxygen concentrators) and supplies (nasogastric tubes and 50% glucose) could prevent health workers from dealing more appropriately with sick children when referral was not possible. Conclusion: When referral is difficult or impossible, some additional supplies and equipment, as well as provision of simple guidelines, may improve management of seriously ill infants and children. (author's)
    Add to my documents.