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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    384217
    Peer Reviewed

    Working together to provide generics for health.

    Beck EJ; Reiss P

    Antiviral therapy. 2014; 19 Suppl 3:1.

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  2. 2
    332957

    The USAID | DELIVER project improves patient access to essential medicines in Zambia. Success story.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, 2011 Feb. [2] p.

    Success story on a logistics system pilot project in Zambia that set out to cost-effectively improve the availability of lifesaving drugs and other essential products at health facilities.
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  3. 3
    310470
    Peer Reviewed

    South Africa's "rollout" of highly active antiretroviral therapy: A critical assessment.

    Nattrass N

    Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2006 Dec; 43(5):618-623.

    The number of people on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in South Africa has risen from < 2000 in October 2003, to almost 200,000 by the end of 2005. Yet South Africa's performance in terms of HAART coverage is poor both in comparison with other countries and the targets set by the government's own Operational Plan. The public-sector HAART ''rollout'' has been uneven across South Africa's nine provinces and the role of external assistance from NGOs and funding agencies such as the Global Fund and PEPFAR has been substantial. The National Treasury seems to have allocated sufficient funding to the Department of Health for a larger HAART rollout, but the Health Minister has not mobilized it accordingly. Failure to invest sufficiently in human resources-- especially nurses--is likely to constrain the growth of HAART coverage. (author's)
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  4. 4
    173648

    Report to the Prime Minister. UK Working Group on Increasing Access to Essential Medicines in the Developing World. Policy recommendations and strategy.

    Short C

    London, England, Department for International Development [DFID], 2002 Nov 28. [11] p.

    This report outlines the discussions and conclusions of the Working Group. It supports specific action on the R&D agenda, and outlines an ambitious international agenda to facilitate a framework for voluntary, widespread, sustainable, and predictable differential pricing as the operational norm1. It proposes, as a short-term goal, to have significant international commitment to an overarching framework for differential pricing in place in time for the 2003 G8 Summit in France. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    066486

    AIDS vaccine trials: bumpy road ahead.

    Cohen J

    SCIENCE. 1991 Mar 15; 251:1312-3.

    AIDS scientists met in February 1991 to discuss international trials of AIDS vaccines because of the urgency in conducting such trials since the US Food and Drug Administration approved 6 vaccines for trails. Major problems discussed were how to insure access to potential AIDS vaccines to developing countries, where to conduct future tests of vaccine efficacy, and which of the leading institutions should coordinate such an effort. The most difficult issue centered around who assumes the risks and who benefits. Many researchers considered conducting AIDS vaccine trials in developing countries since they have a large population varied in age and gender at high risk of HIV infection. Assuming an HIV vaccine is effective, additional questions must be addressed: How can a developing country afford a vaccine at free market prices? If that country does get the vaccine should not other developing countries also get it? Who will pay for it and distribute it? WHO has already contacted ministries of health about AIDS trials. Other organizations, e.g., the US Centers for Disease Control and the US National Institutes of Health, also already involved in international AIDS vaccine research do not want to be kept out of the Phase III trials. Some recommended that WHO be the international umbrella, others suggested that no organization control all the research. Nevertheless the vaccine will be produced in a rich country, and if left to the free market, it will be too expensive. 1 suggestions is a 2-tiered pricing plan in which rich countries pay higher prices thereby subsidizing the price in poor countries. Another is a patent exchange where the vaccine developers donate the vaccine patent to an international organization and they in turn can get an extension on an existing patent. Another alternative includes removing AIDS vaccines from the private sector altogether.
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