Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    375173

    Task sharing to improve access to family planning / contraception

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 12 p. (Summary Brief WHO/RHR/17.20)

    Contraception is an inexpensive and cost-effective intervention, but health workforce shortages and restrictive policies on the roles of mid- and lower-level cadres limit access to effective contraceptive methods in many settings. Expanding the provision of contraceptive methods to other health worker cadres can significantly improve access to contraception for all individuals and couples. Many countries have already enabled mid- and lower-level cadres of health workers to deliver a range of contraceptive methods, utilizing these cadres either alone or as part of teams within communities and/or health care facilities. The WHO recognizes task sharing as a promising strategy for addressing the critical lack of health care workers to provide reproductive, maternal and newborn care in low-income countries. Task sharing is envisioned to create a more rational distribution of tasks and responsibilities among cadres of health workers to improve access and cost-effectiveness.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    374222

    Quality of care in contraceptive information and services, based on human rights standards: a checklist for health care providers.

    Kiarie J; Khosla R; Ali M; Cottingham J

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 32 p.

    Unmet need for contraception remains high in many settings, and is highest among the most vulnerable in society: adolescents, the poor, those living in rural areas and urban slums, people living with HIV, and internally displaced people. The latest estimates are that 225 million women have an unmet need for modern contraception, and the need is greatest where the risks of maternal mortality are highest. There is increasing recognition that promotion and protection of human rights in contraceptive services and programs is critical to addressing this challenge. However, despite these efforts, human rights are often not explicitly integrated into the design, implementation and monitoring of services. A key challenge is how to best support health care providers and facility managers at the point of service delivery, often in low-resource real-world settings, to ensure their use of human rights aspects in provision of contraceptive services. The point of service delivery is the most direct point of contact where potential violations/omissions of rights come into play and requires special attention. This checklist covers five areas of competence needed by health care providers to provide quality of care in contraceptive information and services including: respecting users’ privacy and guaranteeing confidentiality, choice, accessible and acceptable services, involvement of users in improving services and fostering continuity of care and follow-up. International and regional human rights treaties, national constitutions and laws provide guarantees specifically relating to access to contraceptive information, commodities and services. In addition, over the past few decades, international, regional and national legislative and human rights bodies have increasingly applied human rights to contraceptive information and services. They recommend, among other actions, that states should ensure timely and affordable access to good quality sexual and reproductive health information and services, including contraception, which should be delivered in a way that ensures fully informed decision making, respects dignity, autonomy, privacy and confidentiality, and is sensitive to individuals’ needs and perspectives. This document presents a user friendly checklist specifically addressed to health care providers, at the primary health care level, who are involved in the direct provision of contraceptive information and services. It is complimentary to WHO guidelines on Ensuring human rights in the provision of contraceptive information and services: Guidance and recommendations, and the Implementation Guide published jointly with UNFPA in 2015. This checklist also builds on WHO vision document on Standards for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal and Newborn Care and its ongoing work under the Quality, Equity and Dignity initiative. The checklist should be read along with other guidance from WHO and also from partners.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    329388
    Peer Reviewed

    Essential contraceptives: public movement and technical advocacy.

    Edouard L

    Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. 2008 Oct; 34(4):269-70.

    User choice is central to contraceptive practice, as opposed to therapeutic care where the view of the prescriber tends to prevail. Provider organisations have to make difficult decisions in selecting the methods of contraception that are offered, particularly with the multitude of new products and the controversies that have surrounded the value of some of them. The World Health Organization (WHO) Model List of Essential Medicines is a valuable tool in strengthening the provision of contraceptive commodities as part of international development efforts.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    308491

    Improving access to quality care in family planning: WHO's four cornerstones of evidence-based guidance.

    Wu SC; Zou Y; Church K; Meirik O

    Journal of Reproduction and Contraception. 2007 Jun; 18(2):63-71.

    The four cornerstones of guidance in technique service of family planning are established by WHO based on high quality evidences. They have been updated according to the appearing new evidences, and the consensuses were reached by the international experts in this field. The four documents include Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, Decision-making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers and The Global Handbook for Family Planning Providers. The first two documents mainly face to the policy-makers and programme managers and were treated as the important references for creating the local guideline. The other two documents were developed for the front-line health-care and family planning providers at different levels, which include plenty of essential technical information to help providers improve their ability in service delivery and counselling. China paid great attention to the introduction and application of WHO guidelines. As soon as the newer editions of these documents were available, the Chinese version would be followed. WHO guidelines have been primarily adapted with the newly issued national guideline, The Clinical Practical Skill Guidelines- Family Planning Part, which was established by China Medical Association. At the same time, the WHO guidelines have been introduced to some of the clinicians and family planning providers at different levels. In the future, more special training courses will be introduced to the township level based on the needs of grass-root providers. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    115439

    Contraceptive method mix. Guidelines for policy and service delivery.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1994. viii, 143 p.

    This World Health Organization publication provides an analysis of the importance of providing a mix of contraceptive methods to the achievement of family planning (FP) program goals. The first chapter defines contraceptive method mix as a component of reproductive health care for women. Chapter 2 looks at the impact of method mix on contraceptive prevalence. Chapter 3 provides detailed information on all of the currently available methods. The fourth chapter considers the factors that play a role in the successful matching of methods to clients. Chapter 5 describes the program factors that influence method mix. The sixth chapter deals with information, education, and communication (IEC) to promote method mix and includes a discussion of the importance of IEC to client choice as well as guidelines covering the role of providers, administrators, and policymakers in IEC. Chapter 7 provides guidelines for the training and supervision of contraceptive providers including supporting and coordinating training and supervision activities, determining training needs, and the relationship among training, supervision, and quality of care. The eighth chapter covers such issues as the introduction of new methods as research and development and introduction procedures. Chapter 9 discusses the essential role of evaluation in determining whether method mix and client choice objectives are being met. Guidelines are proposed for defining the scope of the evaluation, formulating the questions to be addressed, identifying the measurable indicators of achievement, determining acceptable levels of achievement, choosing a methodology and collecting data, and analyzing information and recommending changes. The concluding chapter provides the following steps program managers, administrators, and policymakers can take in insuring provision of an appropriate method mix and, thereby, improving contraceptive prevalence rates and accelerating fertility decline: 1) assessing client needs; 2) reviewing and changing existing policy; 3) considering costs; 4) paying attention to logistics; 5) developing IEC, training, and supervisory capabilities; 6) including indicators of client choice in monitoring and evaluation; and 7) evaluating method mix based on client choice and satisfaction and on overall contraceptive use.
    Add to my documents.