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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    340409

    Access to healthcare through community health workers in East and Southern Africa.

    Kumar M; Nefdt R; Ribaira E; Diallo K

    New York, New York, UNICEF, Program Division, Health Section, Knowledge Management and Implementation Research Unit, 2014 Jul. [70] p. (Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Working Paper)

    In addition to a comprehensive literature review, the study used a cross-sectional survey with close- and open-ended questions administered to UNICEF Country Offices and public sector key informants to investigate and map CHW characteristics and activities throughout the region. Responses were received from 20 of the 21 UNICEF Country Offices in the UNICEF East and Southern Africa region in May-June 20013. Data on 37 cadres from across the 20 countries made up of nearly 266,000 CHWs form the basis of this report. This report catalogues the types and characteristics of CHWs, their relationship to the broader health system, the health services they provide and geographic coverage of their work.
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  2. 2
    280295

    Reaching communities for child health and nutrition: a proposed implementation framework for HH/C IMCI.

    Workshop on Reaching Communities for Child Health: Advancing PVO / NGO Technical Capacity and Leadership for Household and Community Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (HH/C IMCI) (2001: Baltimore)

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival [BASICS], 2001. [10] p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-99-00007-00; USAID Contract No. FAO-A-00-98-00030-00)

    The Household and Community component of IMCI (Integrated Management of Childhood Illness) was officially launched as an essential component of the IMCI strategy at the First IMCI Global Review and Coordination Meeting in September 1997. Participants recognized that improving the quality of care at health facilities would not by itself be effective in realizing significant reductions in childhood mortality and morbidity because numerous caretakers do not seek care at facilities. Since that first meeting, several efforts were undertaken to strengthen interagency collaboration for promoting and implementing community approaches to child health and nutrition. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    184911

    Sex work and HIV / AIDS. UNAIDS technical update. [Prostitución y VIH/SIDA. Actualización técnica de ONUSIDA]

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2002 Jun. 19 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Technical Update)

    This Technical Update focuses on the challenges involved in the protection of sex workers (and, subsequently, the general population) from HIV infection, and discusses the key elements of various effective interventions. Significantly higher rates of HIV infection have been documented among sex workers and their clients, compared with most other population groups. Though sex work is often a significant means of HIV infection entering the general population, studies indicate that sex workers are among those most likely to respond positively to HIV/STI prevention programmes—for example, by increasing their use of condoms with clients. This document explores the many issues involved in providing care and support for sex workers, preventing entry into sex work, and reducing risk and vulnerability through programmes at the individual, community and government levels. (author's)
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  4. 4
    114830

    Community availability of ARI drugs in Guatemala, Guatemala, Guatemala, July 23 to August 5, 1995.

    McCarthy D

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1995. [4], 11, [45] p. (Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 008-GU-01-015; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-Q-08-3032)

    As part of a series of activities designed to reduce morbidity and mortality from acute respiratory infections in children under the age of 5 in Guatemala, a consultant from the BASICS (Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival) program visited Guatemala in 1995 to analyze, modify, and field test the protocol developed by the USAID Mission to document the degree to which drugs prescribed for pneumonia are available in the community through the private sector. This field report provides background information and describes the current situation in Guatemala in terms of availability of drugs in the public sector through the Ministry of Health, the Drogueria Nacional, municipalities, and the Pan American Health Organization. Relevant activities in the private sector are also described, including the for-profit businesses as well as services provided by UNICEF, the European Union, and nongovernmental organizations. A brief overview of one health area gives an example of the current situation. The result of this consultancy visit was the determination that the situation merited adjustment of the originally requested study and that the survey as designed would likely require modification and application within target communities. Included among the appendices is the original protocol developed for assessing community drug availability.
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  5. 5
    052929

    The Bamako initiative [letter].

    Ofosu-Amaah S

    Lancet. 1989 Jan 21; 1(8630):162.

    This letter was written in defense of a November 19, 1988 editorial discussing the Bamako Initiative. The writer, who works for UNICEF, has been working, with WHO, on the Initiative for the past year. In addition, he taught and practiced pediatrics in Ghana for 25 years. He claims the idea of "free" health services has undermined traditional African practice and confused the debate about fairness and community responsibility. UNICEF and WHO feel that increased community involvement and contribution to costs will strengthen Primary Health Care and maternal and child health systems. Acknowledged difficulties of the program, such as equity, management, foreign currency, and drug orientation are being addressed. Research and experience in community financing for health in Africa is felt to provide a solid basis for proceeding with the Bamako Initiative.
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  6. 6
    020882

    The experience of the Association for Voluntary Sterilization in supporting vasectomy programs.

    Jezowski TW; Ahmad JS

    [Unpublished] 1982. Paper prepared for Conference on Vasectomy, Colombo, Sri Lanka, Oct. 4-7, 1982. 21 p.

    Discusses the factors responsible for the decline of male acceptance of vasectomy over the past decade. The Association for Voluntary Sterilization (AVS) is a nonprofit organization working in the United States which helps funding of similar programs in other developed and developing countries. Reasons for the decline of vasectomy acceptance include the lack of attention paid to male sterilization in countries with family planning programs, the introduction of new technology for female sterilization, the introduction of new effective methods of contraception, and the exaggerated sexual role of the male and the need to protect his virility. The author reviews successful vasectomy programs and finds that, to be successful, a program should have strong leadership, a focussed design, clinic hours that would not interfere with patients' working schedules, and should pay attention to the needs of men, e.g., emphasizing that vasectomy does not cause impotency. The program should also have a community-based orientation, since all the services are not hospital-based and can be brought to the client's home, thereby emphasizing the minor nature of the surgery. AVS believes that vasectomy as a means of family planning can be effective. It is safe, inexpensive, simple, and deliverable. A special fund was allocated in 1983 to stimulate the development of several pilot and demonstration projects in a variety of countries.
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