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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    323734

    Public policy and franchising reproductive health: current evidence and future directions. Guidance from a technical consultation meeting.

    Huntington D; Sulzbach S; O'Hanlon B

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2007. [30] p.

    To assist policymakers and researchers to take advantage of lessons learned in the area of private-provider networks, particularly franchises, and to explore the types of policy options available to facilitate a greater role for the private sector, the World Health Organization's Department of Reproductive Health and Research, in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development's (USAID) Private Sector Partnerships-One project, convened a technical consultation from 7 to 9 December, 2006 in Geneva, Switzerland. The meeting, entitled "Public Policy and Franchising Reproductive Health: current evidence and future directions", brought together experts in private-provider networks and franchises as well as in public policy. The consultation: reviewed the evidence to date on the performance and impact of health networks and franchises in low- and middle-income countries; explored public policy options that can facilitate and support the delivery of reproductive health through private-provider networks and health franchises in low- and middle-income countries. This Guidance Note is based on the proceedings of the meeting and offers policymakers and researchers the latest evidence on private-provider networks and franchises, lessons learned in the field, and policy recommendations on how to mobilize private-provider networks and health franchises to help address reproductive health care needs in developing countries. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    282828

    The use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests.

    Bell D

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2004. 19 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PN-ADC-611)

    Misdiagnosis of malaria results in significant morbidity and mortality. Rapid, accurate and accessible detection of malaria parasites has an important role in addressing this, and in promoting more rational use of increasingly costly drugs, in many endemic areas. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) offer the potential to provide accurate diagnosis to all at risk populations for the first time, reaching those unable to access good quality microscopy services. The success of RDTs in malaria control will depend on good quality planning and implementation. This booklet is designed to assist those involved in malaria management in this task. While this new diagnostic tool is finding its place in management of this major global disease, there is a window of opportunity in which good practices can be established by health services and become the norm. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    273837

    The role of the health sector in supporting adolescent health and development. Materials prepared for the technical briefing at the World Health Assembly, 22 May 2003.

    Brandrup-Lukanow A; Akhsan S; Conyer RT; Shaheed A; Kianian-Firouzgar S

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2003. 15 p.

    I am very pleased to be here, and to be part of the discussion on Young Peoples Health at the World Health Assembly, for two reasons: because of the work we have been doing in adolescent health over the past years together with the Member States of the European Region of WHO, the work in cooperation with other UN agencies, especially UNICEF, UNFPA, and UNAIDS on adolescent health and development. Secondly, because Youth is a priority area of work of German Development Cooperation, and of the German Agency for Technical Cooperation, where I am working presently. Indeed, we have devoted this years GTZ´s open house day on development cooperation to youth I would also like to take this opportunity to remember the work of the late Dr. Herbert Friedman, former Chief of Adolescent Health in WHO, whose vision of the importance of working for and with young people has inspired many of the national plans and initiatives which we will hear about today. In many countries of the world, young people form the majority of populations, and yet their needs are being insufficiently met through existing health and social services. The health of young people was long denied the public, and public health attention it deserves. Adolescence is a driving force of personal, but also social development, as young people gradually discover, and question and challenge the adult world they are growing into. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    120853

    Contraceptive requirements and logistics management needs in Bangladesh.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical and Evaluation Division. Reproductive Health / Family Planning Branch

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1995. ix, 115 p. (Technical Report No. 23)

    This report contains the results of a 1994 UN Population Fund (UNFPA) mission to Bangladesh undertaken on behalf of the UN's Global Initiative on Contraceptive Requirements and Logistics Management Needs. After presenting an executive summary, the report opens with an introductory chapter which describes the UNFPA Global Initiative, Bangladesh's population and family planning (FP) policies, policy strategies, the structure of the national FP program, the delivery of FP services, and donor assistance. Chapter 2 covers contraceptive requirements and reviews the longterm projection methodology as well as projects to meet government objectives for the year 2005. The third chapter deals with logistics management in terms of distribution channels and contraceptive supply systems. Chapter 4 discusses various aspects of contraceptive manufacturing including taxes and duties and quality assurance. The next chapter looks at the role of nine nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector (private practitioners, private corporations, and the social marketing company). This chapter also covers the sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV/AIDS prevention activities undertaken by NGOs and coordination and collaboration between NGOs and the government. Chapter 6 is concerned with the use of condoms for STD/HIV/AIDS prevention, and chapter 7 provides a financial analysis of the allocations and expenditures of the government program, the World Bank-assisted program, the UNFPA-assisted program, and the program supported by the US Agency for International Development. This chapter also considers financial aspects of program performance, contraceptive requirements, contraceptive consumption and costs, and sustainability.
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  5. 5
    096820

    Contraceptive requirements and logistics management needs in Viet Nam.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical and Evaluation Division. Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning Branch

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1994. ix, 92 p. (Technical Report No. 16)

    In 1989, the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) began its "Global Initiative" to estimate "Contraceptive Requirements and Logistics Management Needs" throughout the developing world in the 1990s. After the initial study was completed, 12 countries were chosen for the preparation of more detailed estimates with information on program needs for logistics management of contraceptive commodities, options for local production, the involvement of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector in the supply of contraceptives, condom requirements for sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV/AIDS prevention, and financing issues. The fact-finding mission to Viet Nam took place in 1993. This technical report presents a consensus of the findings and conclusions of that mission. After an executive summary and introductory chapter, which discusses population and family planning and the AIDS epidemic in Viet Nam, chapter 2 covers contraceptive requirements including longterm forecasting methodology, projected longterm contraceptive commodity requirements, short-term forecasting and requirements, and forecasting of condom requirements for HIV/AIDS prevention. Logistics management is considered next, with emphasis on public and private organizations which participate in contraceptive distribution, procurement, and allocation to outlets; the reception, warehousing, and distribution of contraceptives; warehousing regulations; the logistics management information system; and monitoring. Chapter 4 deals with contraceptive manufacturing and discusses the regulatory environment and quality assurance, condoms, IUDs, oral and other steroidal contraceptives, and related issues. The fifth chapter presents the role of NGOs and the private sector and discusses mass organizations, social marketing, and future private-sector options, opportunities, and constraints. A financial analysis provided in chapter 6 relays sources and use of funds, trends in financial contributions for 1985-2000, future funding requirements, and contraceptive cost implications for individuals. The final chapter considers condom programming for HIV/AIDS prevention with information given on current status and patterns; projected trends; the National AIDS committee; an overview of international donor assistance; major condom distribution channels and outlets, condom demand-generation activities, forecasting requirements for 1993-2002, and condom supply activities. A summary of key knowledge, attitude, and practice findings about AIDS and condoms is appended as is additional information on contraceptive requirements and condom programming for HIV/AIDS prevention. The report contains 17 tables and 1 figure, and 18 specific recommendations are made for the topics covered.
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  6. 6
    096819

    Contraceptive requirements and logistics management needs in the Philippines.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical and Evaluation Division. Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning Branch

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1994. x, 122 p. (Technical Report No. 17)

    In 1989, the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) began its "Global Initiative" to estimate "Contraceptive Requirements and Logistics Management Needs" throughout the developing world in the 1990s. After the initial study was completed, 12 countries were chosen for the preparation of more detailed estimates with information on program needs for logistics management of contraceptive commodities, options for local production, the involvement of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector in the supply of contraceptives, condom requirements for sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV/AIDS prevention, and financing issues. The fact-finding mission to the Philippines took place in 1993. In the introductory chapter of this technical report, the Global Initiative is described and the Philippine Population Program is presented in terms of the demographic picture, the population policy framework, the Philippine Family Planning (FP) Program, STD/AIDS control and prevention efforts, and an overview of donor assistance from 1) the UNFPA, 2) USAID, 3) the World Bank, 4) the Asian Development Bank, 5) the Australian International Development Assistance Bureau, 6) the Canadian International Development Agency, 7) the Commission of the European Community, 8) the International Planned Parenthood Federation, 9) the Japanese International Cooperation Agency, and 10) the Netherlands. The second chapter presents contraceptive requirements including longterm forecasting methodology, projected longterm commodity requirements, condom requirements for STD/AIDS prevention, total commodity requirements for 1993-2002, short-term procurement projections, and projections and calculations of unmet need. Chapter 3 covers logistics management for 1) the public sector, 2) condoms for STD/AIDS preventions, 3) NGOs, and 4) the commercial sector. The fourth chapter is devoted to a consideration of private practitioners and a detailed look at the ways that NGOs relate to FP groups. This chapter also covers the work of NGOs in STD/AIDS prevention and coordination and collaboration among NGOs. Chapter 5 is devoted to the private commercial sector and includes information on social marketing, the commercial sector, and duties and taxes. The issues addressed in chapter 6 are contraceptive manufacturing and quality assurance, including the potential for the local manufacture of OCs, condoms, IUDs, injectables, and implants. The national AIDS prevention and control program, the forecasting of condom requirements for STD/AIDS prevention, and policy and managerial issues are considered in chapter 7. The last chapter provides a financial analysis of the sources and uses of funds for contraceptives including donated commodities, the private commercial sector, cost recovery issues, and regulations and policies, such as taxes and duties on donated contraceptives, which affect commodities. 5 appendices provide additional information on contraceptive requirements, logistics management and costs, the private commercial sector, condoms for STD/AIDS prevention, and a financial analysis. Information provided by the texts and appendices is presented in tables and charts throughout the report.
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  7. 7
    140751

    Partnership with civil society. A review of progress since the International Conference on Population and Development.

    Desai A

    [Unpublished] 1999. Prepared for the NGO Forum on ICPD Plus 5, The Hague, Netherlands, February 6-7, 1999 [80] i.

    A technical report reviews the progress made by the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) in partnership with civil society, including nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), in achieving the objectives of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) Program of Action. The analysis is based on an examination of several documents and reports of consultations, technical meetings and round tables in 1997-98 in various thematic areas in the context of the ICPD+5 review. Chapter II charts the progress of UNFPA support for and collaboration with civil society/NGOs at international, regional and national levels since the ICPD. Chapter III examines the report of the Dhaka Round Table, the Inquiry responses, and other ICPD+5 review reports. Chapter IV presents the actions proposed by civil society and NGOs. Chapter V presents conclusions and includes suggestions for mechanisms that would enhance and sustain collaboration, cooperation, coordination, and partnership among international organizations. Furthermore, the lessons from success stories of women's empowerment in implementing the Program of Action need to be transferred to other countries.
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  8. 8
    138224

    Sustainable ORS use in West Africa through private-public partnership, January 18-28, 1998, Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire, Dakar, Senegal.

    McGuire D

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival [BASICS], 1998. [3], 16, [3] p. (Report; USAID Contract No. HRN-Q-06-93-00032-00; USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-93-00031-00)

    This trip report pertains to travel to Abidjan and Dakar, Senegal, during January 18-28, 1998, for the purpose of organizing and facilitating a consensus meeting between the partners in the West Africa ORS (oral rehydration solution) Initiative. The consensus meeting report includes an overview of the regional strategy, the perspectives of the Population Services International (PSI) and the Rhone-Poulenc Rorer (RPR), and status reports for Cote d'Ivoire, Cameroon, and Burkina Faso. The report discusses the price debate and promotional materials. The report consultant also briefed the USAID and local BASICS staff in Dakar on the results of the consensus meeting and implications for the initiative in Senegal. The consultant met with Senegal Ministry of Health staff, RPR-Dakar, and the company that was conducting market research on demand for ORS. The initiative aimed to establish a commercial sector partnership to ensure sustainable supply and promotion of ORS. The consensus meeting was undertaken to discuss the progress to date, and necessary next steps among central, regional, and country level staff from PSI and RPR. A memorandum of understanding that would specify objectives, roles, and responsibilities of partners was signed in December 1997, for a 10-year period. UNICEF was informed that the commercial sector initiative was meant to create demand among those with disposable income and not meant to serve the poorest of the poor. The initiative was part of an integrated national strategy for program sustainability that would allow governments to reallocate limited resources to better serve the needy.
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  9. 9
    104682

    Indonesia trip report, Dec 4-22, 1994.

    Northrup RS

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1994. [50] p. (BASICS Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 000 IN 00 011; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-C-00-3031-00)

    An appraisal team travelled to Indonesia in late 1994 to assess the World Bank Health Project IV (HP-IV). This project seeks to improve the quality, equity, and accessibility of basic health services in five provinces through measures such as child survival programs and improvements in health services provided through the private sector. Support from national policy makers was obtained for collaboration in East Java between HP-IV and the Basics Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival Project. Evaluators noted an excessive amount of training, causing health workers to be away from their jobs for extended periods of time. Recommended were alternatives such as on-the-job courses, a training information system, and a ceiling on time allowed off work to attend courses (e.g., nine days every six months).
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  10. 10
    060875

    Developing a self-financing, factory-based contraceptive distribution project in St. Lucia.

    Logan D

    Washington, D.C., TvT Associates, MORE Project, 1990 Mar. [2], 26, [12] p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-3030-C-00-8167)

    A revitalized, nearly self-sufficient, factory-based contraceptive distribution project has existed in St. Lucia since the beginning of 1990. Seeded in 1981, with 1-year funding from the International Planned Parenthood Federation, the project was on shaky financial footing through the 1980s. The Family Planning Association (FPA) of St. Lucia, with the technical assistance of the Maximizing Results of Operations Research (MORE) project, has, however, turned the project into a viable distribution program financially-backed by factories employing almost 2,500 workers. This successful turnaround is due largely to the accomplishments of a MORE business consultant who made 2 field visits in 1989. In addition to helping the FPA expand the project, the consultant developed a business plan, and encouraged factory owners and business leaders to back the project. He held both individual meetings and a formal group presentation. The business plan, and activities and results of the field visits are presented in the report. The consultant found a 1-to-1 sales approach best in recruiting company members for the project, supports continued application of the formal presentation, suggests a hotel setting for business group meetings, and notes island-wide consensus for support of the project. Although not quite finalized, and expected to work on a restricted operating budget, the project's largest remaining obstacle is where to locate the nurse.
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  11. 11
    012512

    Nutrition.

    U.S. Agency for International Development. Bureau for Program and Policy Coordination

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Agency for International Development, May 1982. 12 p. (A.I.D. Policy Paper)

    Estimates indicate that 600 million people in less developed countries (LDCs) are in danger of not getting enough to eat. This policy paper reviews the justifications for US investment in improving nutrition in LDCs and sets out some policy guidelines for USAID programs. The objective of the nutrition policy is to maximize the nutritional impact of USAID's economic assistance. The policy recommendations are to place the highest priority on alleviating undernutrition through sectoral programs which incorporate nutrition as a factor in decision making. This can be effected through identifying projects based upon analysis of food consumption problems; this is especially appropriate in formulating country development strategies, especially in the areas of agriculture, rural development, education and health. USAID will give increasing attention, through research, analysis, experimental projects, and programs, to improve the ability to utilize the private sector whenever feasible to implement the policy, and to target projects to at-risk groups with the design of overcoming or minimizing constraints to meeting their nutritional needs. It will also monitor the impacts of development projects and strengthen the capacity of indigenous organizations to analyze and overcome nutrition problems.
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