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  1. 1
    322596

    The Positive Partnerships Program in Thailand: empowering people living with HIV. Highlights.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Sep. 15 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/07.25E; JC1362E)

    A project rolling out in rural Thailand, the Positive Partnerships Program (PPP), has shown that targeted economic assistance can boost self-esteem, ambition and hope-all of which help reinvigorate community bonds and have a beneficial impact in promoting enabling environments for HIV prevention and treatment efforts. This best practice document examines how and why PPP may serve as a flexible and adaptive model in other countries. The project has two distinct yet complementary goals. to enable people living with HIV to lift themselves out of poverty, through the provision of microcredit loans that allow people to set up small businesses in their communities; to reduce HIV-related stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV through business partnerships between one HIV-positive person and one HIV-negative person. The enthusiastic response to PPP from people living with HIV and funders alike serves as a useful reminder of the need to develop comprehensive strategies in response to the AIDS epidemic that reflect a full range of economic, social, legal and political considerations-not just those narrowly based on health. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    322595

    The Positive Partnerships Program in Thailand: empowering people living with HIV.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Jul. 48 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/07.22E; JC1260E)

    Nearly 600 000 people are living with HIV in Thailand. As in every other country, most are poor and many are isolated from their communities. Breaking down the mutually reinforcing barriers of poverty and stigma they face has proved immensely difficult. These barriers are not insurmountable, however. A new project rolling out in rural Thailand, the Positive Partnership Program (PPP), has shown that targeted economic assistance can boost self-esteem, ambition and hope-all of which help reinvigorate community bonds and have a major, positive impact on HIV prevention and treatment efforts. The core of PPP is the provision of microcredit loans to resource-constrained HIV-positive individuals who otherwise have no access to credit in conventional, affordable ways. These loans are intended to support the efforts of people living with HIV to lift themselves out of poverty by setting up small businesses in their communities. Closely linked to this poverty-reduction goal is another vital objective: the reduction of HIV-related stigma and discrimination. As conceptualized by PPP's implementing entity-the Population and Community Development Association (PDA), a Bangkok-based nongovernmental organization-a unique aspect of the PPP project greatly facilitates progress towards achieving these two goals simultaneously: loans are given out not to people living with HIV alone but to partnerships between an HIV-positive and an HIV-negative person. By the end of 2005, a total of 375 partnerships had been formed since the project began in January 2004. (excerpt)
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