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  1. 1
    099397

    The International Conference on Population and Development, September 5-13, 1994, Cairo, Egypt. Nepal's country report.

    Nepal. National Planning Commission

    Kathmandu, Nepal, National Planning Commission, 1993 Sep. vi, 49 p.

    Prepared for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, this country report from Nepal opens with a description of the geographic features and administrative regions, zones, and districts of the country. 91% of the population of Nepal is rural, and agriculture accounts for 57% of the gross domestic product. Nepal has made some socioeconomic gains from 1961 to 1991 which are reflected in improved life expectancy (from 34 to 54.4 years), a decline in the infant mortality rate (from 200 to 102), and an improvement in the literacy rate (from 9 to > 40%). However, the per capital income of US $180 and rapid population growth have impeded improvement in the standard of living. The new government of Nepal is committed to establishing a better balance between population and the environment. This report provides a discussion of population growth and structure; population distribution, urbanization, and migration; the environment and sustainable development; the status of women; population policies and programs (highlighting the population policy of the plan for 1992-97); the national family planning program and health programs; and intervention issues. A 15-point summary is provided, and details of the objectives, priorities, and major policy thrust in regard to population and development of the Eight Plan (1992-97) are appended.
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  2. 2
    071380

    Mission finds Egypt poised for "demographic breakthrough".

    POPULATION. 1992 Feb; 18(2):3.

    In 1991, an UNFPA Programme Review and Strategy Development mission went to Egypt and noted that the government's population and development goals for 1988-92 had been realized. Between 1988-91, the contraceptive prevalence rate rose from 37.6 to 47.6% and infant mortality fell from 54 to 50. Data indicated that maternal mortality was also declining. The crude birth rate fell from 39.8 to 32.2 (1985-90) which slowed growth from 2.8 to 2.5%. Yet this progress may not prevent an environmental disaster or improve individual standards of living. In fact, the Minister for the Economy noted in December 1991 that population growth was the only obstacle to economic success in Egypt. The mission recommended that any large amounts of population and development. The population grew >3-fold in 50 years bringing its population to almost 56 million. Demographers have predicted the population will reach 70 million in 2000. As os 1991, 96% of the population lived on 4% of the land which borders the River Nile. Family planning (FP) programs have traditionally been centrally organized, but the mission noted that decentralized programs are needed. It further stated that local FP efforts should form a bridge between public and private FP providers. The report also stressed that UNFPA should focus its effect in Upper Egypt where population growth is the fastest. It also recommended that UNFPA take a more comprehensive view of women, population, and development issues, especially since the burden of contraception falls on women. This suggestion included a wider range of contraceptives and more female physicians. FP providers should target younger women since most contraceptive users have already reached their desired family size. Finally, the mission advocated local contraceptive production and more involvement of the private sector.
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