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  1. 1
    375990

    Private sector: Who is accountable? for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health. 2018 report. Summary of recommendations.

    Independent Accountability Panel for Every Woman, Every Child, Every Adolescent

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2018. 12 p.

    This report presents five recommendations, which are addressed to governments, parliaments, the judiciary, the United Nations (UN) system, the UN Global Compact, the Every Woman Every Child (EWEC) partners, donors, civil society and the private sector itself. Recommendations include: 1) Access to services and the right to health. To achieve universal access to services and protect the health and related rights of women, children and adolescents, governments should regulate private as well as public sector providers. Parliaments should strengthen legislation and ensure oversight for its enforcement. The UHC2030 partnership should drive political leadership at the highest level to address private sector transparency and accountability. 2) The pharmaceutical industry and equitable access to medicines. To ensure equitable, affordable access to quality essential medicines and related health products for all women, children and adolescents, governments and parliaments should strengthen policies and regulation governing the pharmaceutical industry. 3) The food industry, obesity and NCDs. To tackle rising obesity and NCDs among women, children and adolescents, governments and parliaments should regulate the food and beverage industry, and adopt a binding global convention. Ministries of education and health should educate students and the public at large about diet and exercise, and set standards in school-based programmes. Related commitments should be included in the next G20 Summit agenda. 4) The UN Global Compact and the EWEC partners. The UN Global Compact and the EWEC partners should strengthen their monitoring and accountability standards for engagement of the business sector, with an emphasis on women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health. They should advocate for accountability of the for-profit sector to be put on the global agenda for achieving UHC and the SDGs, including at the 2019 High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development and the Health Summit. The UN H6 Partnership entities and the GFF should raise accountability standards in the country programmes they support. 5) Donors and business engagement in the SDGs. Development cooperation partners should ensure that transparency and accountability standards aligned with public health are applied throughout their engagement with the for-profit sector. They should invest in national regulatory and oversight capacities, and also regulate private sector actors headquartered in their countries.
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  2. 2
    375989

    Private sector: who is accountable? for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health. 2018 report.

    Independent Accountability Panel for Every Woman, Every Child, Every Adolescent

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2018. 80 p.

    In line with the mandate from the UN Secretary-General, every year the IAP issues a report that provides an independent snapshot of progress on delivering promises to the world’s women, children and adolescents for their health and well-being. Recommendations are included on ways to help fast-track action to achieve the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health 2016-2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals - from the specific lens of accountability, of who is responsible for delivering on promises, to whom, and how. The theme of the IAP’s 2018 report is accountability of the private sector. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development will not be achieved without the active and meaningful involvement of the private sector. Can the private sector be held accountable for protecting women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health? And if so, who is responsible for holding them to account, and what are the mechanisms for doing so? This report looks at three key areas of private sector engagement: health service delivery the pharmaceutical industry and access to medicines the food industry and its significant influence on health and nutrition, with a focus NCDs and rising obesity.
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  3. 3
    275761

    National spending for AIDS 2004. Prepublication draft.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Global Resource Tracking Consortium for AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2004 Jul. [82] p.

    In monitoring resource flows for HIV and AIDS, it has proven easier to collect information on donor governments, multilateral agencies, foundations and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) than to obtain reliable budget information on domestic outlays for HIV and AIDS in affected countries. As a result, UNAIDS has focused significant efforts on strengthening the capacity of countries to monitor and track expenditures for HIV and AIDS. This report summarizes the latest information available on HIV-related spending in 26 countries. Seventeen of the countries are from the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region. Resource tracking in the LAC region, as well as in Thailand, Burkina Faso and Ghana has benefited from the leadership of the Regional AIDS Initiative for Latin America and the Caribbean (SIDALAC), which helped implement the National AIDS Account (NAA) approach. Beginning with pilot projects in three countries in 1997–1998, NAA has now been extended throughout the region, in large part due to the provision of extensive technical assistance by countries involved in the early pilot projects. NAA uses a matrix system that describes the level and flow of health expenditures on AIDS. The NAA model: a) identifies key actors in HIV and AIDS activities; b) uses existing data or makes estimates for specific services or goods purchased; c) analyses domestic (public and private) and international budgets; d) determines out-of-pocket expenditures; and e) assesses the financial dimensions of the country’s response to AIDS. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    191835
    Peer Reviewed

    Status report of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme: January 2003.

    Granich R; Chauhan LS

    Journal of the Indian Medical Association. 2003 Mar; 101(3):150-151.

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious public health problem in spite of DOTS programme recommended by WHO. One person dies from TB in India every minute. Revised National TB Control Programme (RNTCP) is playing a major role in global DOTS expansion. DOTS coverage has expanded from 2% of the population in mid-1998 to 57% by the end of January, 2003. RNTCP has made a significant contribution to public health capacity. The programme has saved the people of India hundreds of millions of dollars. Monitoring the clinical course using smear microscopy and accurately reporting treatment outcomes is essential in well-functioning DOTS programme. RNTCP has invested heavily and made significant strides in maintaining and improving quality DOTS. State and district level programme reviews are a key component of the process. RNTCP has established guidelines for the involvement of the private sector and medical colleges. A member by ongoing technical activities will improve RNTCP’s surveillance and monitoring systems. However a challenge lies with the programme and a collective effort is welcome. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    113716

    Midterm review of the Tanzania Family Planning Services Support (FPSS) Project (621-0173).

    Shutt MM; Fleuret A; Kapiga S; Kirkland R; Magnani R; Mandara N; Mpangile G; Olson C; Omari CK; Pressman W

    Arlington, Virginia, Population Technical Assistance Project [POPTECH], 1994 Dec. xix, 84, [40] p. (POPTECH Report No. 94-011-015; USAID Contract No. CCP-3024-Q-00-3012)

    The Tanzania Family Planning Services Support Project (FPSS) aims to improve the health and welfare of women and children by providing women and couples the opportunity to choose freely the number and spacing of children. FPSS was implemented in 1991. The three interrelated project outputs are expanded delivery of quality family planning services, enhanced Tanzanian institutional capacity, and development of an institutional base. USAID/Tanzania requested a midterm evaluation, which was conducted in December 1994. It supports FPSS by directly providing funds to the government and cooperating agencies who provide technical assistance to the National Family Planning Program and the private sector. Other significant donors to the family planning sector include UNFPA, IPPF, Overseas Development Assistance, and German Association for Technical Cooperation. During 1991-94 modern contraceptive prevalence increased from 7% to 16%. New acceptors increased 40-50%. Monthly resupply clients increased 23%. In mid-1994, 79% of women and 90% of men were familiar with at least one modern contraceptive method. The proportion of facilities providing injectables, IUDs, and vaginal foam increased more than two-fold. Almost all the facilities provided oral contraceptives and condoms. The number of first attendances for family planning services increased 46%. FPSS supported a wide variety of training (e.g., 6 types of training courses), but the needs for more training were stifled by lack of trainers and of supervisors, weak distribution of training documents, failure to institutionalize family planning into the medical and nursing schools, and lack of equipment and supplies. There were solid improvements in contraceptive logistics and availability, strengthening of the family planning unit within the Ministry of Health, and flexibility by USAID/Tanzania's management in addressing changing country needs. Based on the findings, the team developed 12 major recommendations (e.g., development of a national strategy to achieve a sustainable family planning program).
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