Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    058684

    Family planning, the Lebanese experience. A study on the Lebanese Family Planning Association.

    Iliyya S

    [Unpublished] 1984 Jul. [4], 193 p.

    As of 1984, Lebanon had not yet formulated a clear and specific population policy because laws existed against contraception and political differences among the various ethnic groups also existed which culminated in a civil war. Nevertheless the government condoned the creation of the Lebanese Family Planning Association (LFPA) in August 1969 and its activities. The government also helped spread family planning through its own institutions such as the Ministry of Health and the Office of Social Development. Further some of LFPA's staff members have been part of the government itself. LFPA conducted a survey in June 1975 in Zahrani in rural south Lebanon and it showed that the people wished to limit their fertility, but could not since birth control was not available. Therefore LFPA established the 1st Community Based Family Planning Services Program in Zahrani which later spread to other villages. Wasitas (field workers) served as the major means of providing birth control and information to the women. They emphasized child spacing. The wasitas also served as a major adaptive and indigenous agent of social change and development. Initially they underwent intensive training lasting at least 1 week, but in 1979, LFPA hosted annual 1 month training sessions. The wasitas use of traditional communication methods resulted in not only an increase of contraceptive use, but also in meeting the elemental needs of the women for psychological comfort and self reliance. In some instances, however, some wasitas resorted to deception in encouraging the most uneducated women to use birth control because of strong incentives, e.g., the wasita received 50% of the money earned for the sale of each contraceptive. LFPA needed to reassess those measures which lead to possible encroachment of the dignity and freedom of choice of the women villagers.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    770734

    View from the village.

    KEENY S

    Populi. 1977; 4(1):7-13.

    The suggestion at a U.N. Children's Emergency Fund staff meeting that 1/2 the organization's money should be spent on preventing the periodic crises, specifically, on family planning, and the other 1/2 on the miseries of living mothers and children was not accepted in 1958. Another chance for dealing with the problem came through the Population Council in New York. Assigned to East Asia, there was no budgetary support for population policies. Only in South Korea, at the suggestion of the Minister of Planning, was a policy for reducing the birthrate announced. It was the local branch of the International Planned Parenthood Federation that undertook most of the training of the over 2000 field workers hired to visit the rural families especially and to establish a supply line for pills, which were a gift from Sweden. The methods used in order of adoption were the IUD, the oral contraceptive, the vasectomy, condom, and later, subsidized female sterilization. This began in 1963, and it is the 1st example of a population program that has grown until it is now 1 of the soundest anywhere. In East Asia every official program was preceded by activity by some private agency. These usually began in a single clinic to meet the urgent need of mothers who had more children than they could afford and care for. Going out and seeing the people in the various countries of East Asia revealed that they too were aware that they had more children than they could afford. In that 3/4 of the people in East Asia live in villages, it is important that every married couple be visited at home by someone who can explain what family planning is all about and how it will benefit the family and the village. An experienced midwife on a small motorcycle can carry with her all the equipment she heeds and attend to 30 or 40 cases in 1 day. Experience in East Asia suggests that any nation that really wants to can reduce its annual population growth rate.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    670913

    Women's organisations.

    Hussein A

    In: International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). Preventive medicine and family planning. Proceedings of the 5th Conference of the Europe and Near East Region of the IPPF, Copenhagen, Denmark, July 5-8, 1966. London, England, IPPF, 1967. p. 222-224

    Women's organizations played a significant part in the family planning movement in the United Arab Republic (UAR). In 1962 the President of the UAR made his 1st public pronouncement in favor of family planning. Soon after, the Cairo Women's Club staged the 1st series of public lectures on the subject in the country. This series served to bring the subject into the open. With national and international assistance, other UAR women's groups began to establish family planning clinics around the country. Through the Joint Committee for Family Planning, a number of women's groups attracted international aid to the movement in the UAR, effected cooperation with the national Ministry of Social Affairs, and evolved standardized procedures for registration, education, training, and evaluation to be used by all the family planning clinics in the country. In 1967, the government established a national family planning program. The voluntary women's groups can still serve as a testing ground for the national program.
    Add to my documents.