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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    109688

    Employment-based family planning programs. L'emploi et le planning familial.

    Rinehart W; Blackburn R; Moore SH

    Population Reports. Series J: Family Planning Programs. 1987 Sept-Oct; (34):921-51.

    Family planning services through the workplace is an idea that is attracting more attention, benefit's workers, employers, and nations. Large manufacturers and plantations in India first offered family planning to workers in the 1950s. Now also in Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, South Korea, Turkey, Egypt, Kenya, and elsewhere, many large companies have added family planning to other health services. In some Latin American countries social security systems have added family planning for many workers. Many different groups, including compaines, labor unions, government-sponsored social marketing programs, and the military, run employment-based programs. Services are offered in workplace clinics, through referrals, in free-standing facilities, in social security hospitals, and in community clinics. Funding comes from employers, governments, unions, family planning associations, and USAID. The most effective programs offer supplies and services as well as information, offer them directly at the workplace, and use worker-volunteers to distribute pills and condoms. Successful programs require the full support of company management. Favorable cost-benefit projections can show managers that offering family planning makes financial sense and contributes to employee health.
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  2. 2
    267640

    The use of indicators of financial resources in the health sector. L'emploi des indicateurs de ressources financieres dans le secteur de la sante.

    Parker DA

    World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel de Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales. 1984; 37(4):450-62.

    This article provides an overview of the application of financial resource indicators in health. The focus is on indicators at the country level, although in certain instances related sub-national indicators are considered as well. 1st the different categories of financial resource indicators are described. The international experience in data collection, and problems of data availability and comparability are reviewed. Although the points addressed are relevant to all countries, the discussion is most applicable to the developing world where health information is limited. Particular attention is given to the design adn use of financial resource indicators in monitoring progress towards the goal of health for all. Finally, the steps that may be taken to increase the contribution of financial resource indicators to the health development process are discussed. Viewed economically, the health sector consists of production and consumption of services which have relatively direct influence on population health status. The different types of resources may be linked to their respective prices to show the financial flows that operate within the health system. The sources and uses of funds are identified. 3 types of financial resource indicators can be identified: health within the national economy, the provision of funds from primary sources and the functional and programmatic uses of funds. The 1st type is concerned with the aggregate availability of funds within the national economy and the fraction of those funds which are allocated to health. The 2nd component relates to the origins of the funds which make up the total health expenditure, under the broad headings of public, private and external sources of health finance. The 3rd type refers to the variety of used to which funds from these sources are put (expressed in terms of function e.g. salaries), program type (e.g. primary health care), or activity (e.g. health education).
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  3. 3
    781095

    CBFPS (Community-based Family Planning Services) in Thailand: a community-based approach to family planning.

    BURINTRATIKUL S; SAMANIEGO MC

    Essex, Connecticut, International Council for Educational Development, 1978. (A project to help practitioners help the rural poor, case study no. 6) 91 p

    This report and case study of the Community-Based Family Planning Service (CBFPS) in Thailand describes and evaluates the program in order to provide useful operational lessons for concerned national and international agencies. CBFPS has demonstrated the special role a private organization can play not only in providing family planning services, but in helping to pioneer a more integrated approach to rural development. The significant achievement of CBFPS is that it has overcome the familiar barriers of geographical access to family planning information and contraceptive supplies by making these available in the village community itself. The report gives detailed information on the history and development of the CBFPS, its current operation and organization, financial resources, and overall impact. Several important lessons were learned from the project: 1) the successful development of a project depends on a strong and dynamic leader; 2) cooperation between the public and private sectors is essential; 3) the success of a project depends primarily on the effectiveness of community-based activities; 4) planning and monitoring activities represent significant ingredients of project effectiveness; 5) a successful project needs a sense of commitment among its staff; 6) it is imperative that a project maintain good public relations; 7) the use of family planning strategy in introducing self-supporting development programs can be very effective; 8) manning of volunteer workers is crucial to project success; and 9) aside from acceptor recruitment in the short run, the primary purpose of education in more profound matterns such as childbearing, womens'roles in the family, and family life should also be kept in mind. The key to success lies in continuity of communication and education.
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  4. 4
    734701

    Costa Rican Demographic Association (Asociacion Demografica Costarricense (ADC): the coupon system controversy.

    Korten DC; Ickis V; Ickis JC

    Managua, Nicaragua, Instituto Centroamericano de Administracion de Empresas, 1973. 43 p. (INCAE Management Case No. 9-575-601)

    This case study was developed as a teaching tool for administrative family planning personnel. The Costa Rican Demographic Association (ADC) assumed responsibility for the distribution of oral contraceptives (OCs) through commerical outlets in a program started by Alberto Gonzalez. Gonzalez had organized a rural distribution system of OCs by recruiting local women to sell OCs to friends and relatives at reduced prices. The number of women involved grew so rapidly, Gonzalez, who was a founder of ADC and its first Executive Director, expanded the distribution system to urban areas. In 1964, however, stiff opposition to the distribution system was made by the College of Pharmacists, for OCs were being sold at greatly reduced prices through noncommerical outlets. After difficult negotiation, the College agreed, in 1967, to allow the ADC to import and distribute contraceptives providing a pharmacist supervised the distribution, a doctor's prescription was obtained, and the ADC disburse OCs in pharmacies. The latter provision forced ADC to abandon its highly successful system of individual distributors. Instead, a woman had to go to a clinic, obtain a doctor's prescription as well as a blue (minimal charge) or green (no charge) coupon and then find an authorized outlet to purchase the OCs at a reduced price. The pharmacist had to keep special inventories and maintain a coupon system in order to obtain credit from ADC. ADC had to make sure inventories were maintained and that proper controls were placed on the distribution process. By 1971, 233,309 cycles of OCs were distributed through the coupon system. Nonetheless, questions were raised by USAID and other organizations about control procedures and pricing. It was suggested that it might be more convenient for the patient if the clinics themselves could assume the responsibility of supplying OCs to patients.
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