Your search found 70 Results

  1. 1
    327323

    Prevention is for life. HIV / AIDS: dispatches from the field.

    Leidl P; Gharzeddine O; Ngwa G; Olfarnes T; Plews A

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [2008]. 48 p.

    This advocacy booklet provides real-life examples to illustrate how HIV prevention can save lives in diverse cultural and geographical settings. It includes chapters on youth and HIV, promoting and distributing male and female condoms, protecting women and girls, linking HIV prevention with other sexual and reproductive health care, and empowering populations who are at particular risk. The booklet features stories from Belize, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Nigeria, the Russian Federation, and Tajikistan.
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  2. 2
    326774

    From family planning to HIV / AIDS in Vietnam: Shifting priorities, remaining gaps.

    Le Minh Giang; Nguyen Thi Mai Huong

    In: SexPolitics: Reports from the front lines, edited by Richard Parker, Rosalind Petchesky and Robert Sember. [Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Associacao Brasileira Interdisciplinar de AIDS (ABIA), Sexuality Policy Watch, 2008]. 277-309.

    Globally, both the disjunction between sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS, and the fact that HIV/AIDS has taken over the political and funding agenda, are well noted. A recent editorial in the journal, Reproductive Health Matters, summed up this trend, noting that although HIV/AIDS has been with us for more than two decades, "now, suddenly, following rapid shifts in political leadership, priority setting, power brokering, and funding policies in international health and development circles, it is widely considered an unassailable fact that in the global 'competition' for resources and attention, sexual and reproductive health has less priority and has lost out to AIDS, as if addressing the one had no connection with addressing the other". Has this trend been realized in Vietnam? If so, what are some of the factors that have shaped this trend and which of its characteristics should Vietnam take into account moving forward? (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    312472

    We are getting into a great era of hope. WHO immunization work: 2005 highlights.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, 2006. 56 p. (WHO/IVB/06.02)

    Mission: To vaccinate all people at risk against vaccine-preventable diseases. Immunization is a proven health intervention: it successfully controls and has even eradicated disease. Immunization prevents suffering, disability and death on a large scale. Immunization is one of the least costly and most effective health interventions. Immunization is a channel through which to deliver other life-saving health interventions and can help strengthen health systems. Immunization will directly help achieve the Millennium Development Goals on reducing child mortality, improving maternal health and combating infectious diseases. Immunization carries economic benefits. It contributes to Millennium Development Goals on the eradication of extreme poverty and achieving universal primary education, through helping to ensure the health of boys and girls so they will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling. Immunization policies and strategies are based on evidence and best practices. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    303435

    You are special. For children living in families affected by HIV / AIDS.

    Dunbar M

    [Arlington, Virginia], FHI, IMPACT, [2005]. [38] p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00017-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADE-207)

    There is no one like you in the whole world. You have your own appearance, ability and talents. When your family is affected by HIV/AIDS you will discover new strengths and ways to cope when you face difficulties. You are a wonderful seed like the lotus seed. A beautiful lotus pond starts from one small lotus seed. You are a wonderful seed like the lotus seed. In you there is understanding and love and many different talents. From our ancestors we receive many talents. For example our ability to run fast, to sing beautifully, to make things with our hands, are all seeds we inherit from our ancestors. We also inherit seeds that are not so nice like the seeds of fear and anger. These seeds of fear and anger can make us unhappy. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    297792

    If only. Zambia.

    Mangoye VL

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 15 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    297791

    Arrange my marriage, arrange my death. Zambia.

    Phiri S

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 13 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    296616

    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights now also speaks to children - children's book. [La Declaración Universal de Derechos Humanos ahora al alcance de los niños en un libro infantil]

    Endrst EB

    UN Chronicle. 1990 Jun; 27(2):[2] p..

    The historic document, celebrated as a major UN achievement, was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948. It declares that all human beings "are born free and equal in dignity and rights" and goes on to specify in its 30 articles specific areas of freedom. In December 1989, the Assembly went on to adopt a 54-article Convention on the Rights of the Child. Mr. Roth has worked long and hard to help spread the message of the Declaration around the world. First inspired to work on the document when he was an art student in London in 1977, it took him two years to complete a set of 60 x 80 centimetre prints, derived from woodcuts which the artist carved in reverse images on wooden blocks. The linocut prints of these works, embossed on handmade paper, were purchased by the United Nations and subsequently exhibited in the UN Headquarters lobby in New York beginning in December 1982. Additional sets were acquired for both the UN Centre in Vienna and Geneva Headquarters. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    295757

    Reaching Kenyan youth with HIV messages in school.

    Taravella S

    Arlington, Virginia, Family Health International [FHI], Institute for HIV / AIDS, 2005. 6 p. (Snapshots from the Field; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00017-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse Doc ID / Order No. PN-ADE-597)

    Nuru is an upbeat 17-year-old Kenyan who is well-liked and has many friends. The daughter of a trucker, she lives in a boarding-school, where she has come to know other young people from different parts of the country, different classes and different tribes. Known for her good judgment, Nuru has abstained from sexual activity and is something of a role model for her younger friend, Janet. But Nuru's boyfriend Leon, a soccer player at the school, recently left Nuru for the more free spirited Angel. Angel, who once had sex with a teacher to improve her grades, is kept by a sugar-daddy--who happens to be Janet's father. In a recent six-month period, Leon had sex with six different people and has since become HIV positive. In the teenagers' skittish community, this prompted some to question aloud whether Leon should continue playing team sports or whether another player could even safely wear Leon's jersey. Meanwhile, Nuru's friend Oscar is facing his own HIV dilemma as he adjusts to living with his HIV-positive uncle. In many ways, Nuru and her circle of friends define the challenges of adolescence for young Kenyans. The challenges are very real, but Nuru and her friends are not: Nuru (meaning light in Swahili), Janet, Leon, Oscar and Angel are all characters in a popular comic book series. The Nuru comic books have proven remarkably effective at reaching young people with health messages they may not hear in other ways. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    293436
    Peer Reviewed

    Contemporary issues in women's health.

    Johnson TR; Adanu RM

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2006; 92:5-9.

    The April 2005 edition of Population Reports provides a detailed summary of the different contraceptive choices that are currently available. The report focuses on effective, less costly, easier to deliver contraceptive innovations that have fewer side effects. While some of the new contraceptives discussed are already available in some countries, others are on the brink of introduction. Some of the new methods covered include vaginal rings, transdermal patches, spray-on contraceptives and new implants. Two new variations on fertility awareness-based methods -- the Standard Days Method and the Two-Day method -- are described. The Standard Days Method is reported to be as effective as barrier methods for women with regular cycles between 26 and 32 days long. The Two-Day method can be used by women with cycles of any length regardless of regularity. It however produces best results in couples who can avoid unprotected intercourse for about 10--15 days per cycle. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    288983

    The Lancet's neonatal survival series [letter]

    Schmid G; Broutet N; de Bernis L; Hawkes S

    Lancet. 2005 May 28; 365(9474):1845.

    It is gratifying that The Lancet has called attention to the global problem of neonatal deaths by producing, and electronically distributing, its neonatal survival series. We are disappointed, however, that none of the articles in the series addressed the equally important subject of stillbirth despite The Lancet calling attention in electronic documents to the equal numbers of deaths due to stillbirth and in the neonatal period. A leading and almost totally preventable cause of fetal and neonatal death worldwide is congenital syphilis. A screening test in pregnancy can prevent death from syphilis at both times, but limiting discussion to the neonatal period fails to capture its significance. The number of infants dying annually from congenital syphilis is uncertain, but estimates are more than 500000. Adverse pregnancy outcomes occur in up to 80% of women with early syphilis, including stillbirth (40%), perinatal death (20%), and serious neonatal infection (20%). (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    195832

    Home, the best medicine, Zimbabwe.

    Matende F

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2001 Oct. [14] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops partially funded by the Danish Development Agency (DANIDA). The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. The booklets address a wide-range of issues normally not included in materials for HIV/AIDS such as the secondary status of girls and women in the family, the "sugar daddy" phenomenon, wife inheritance, the hyena practice, traditional medicinal practices superstitions, home-based care and living positively with AIDS. They have one thing in common- they influence greatly a person's safety from contracting HIV/AIDS. We hope that these booklets will inspire readers to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face in their day-to-day relationships. In so doing, they might reach a conclusion that the responsibility is theirs to save their own lives and those of their loved ones from HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    195834

    Me, you and AIDS. Kenya. A product of a UNESCO-DANIDA workshop for preparation of post-literacy materials and radio programmes for women and girls in Africa.

    Nyingi P

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2000 Jan. [24] p.

    Though the booklets are intended for use with neo-literate women and out-of-school girls, the messages in the stories and the radio programme scripts that accompany them are also relevant for use as supplementary reading materials in formal schools for readers of both sexes. The subjects of the booklets, based on the needs assessments, reflect a wide range of needs and conditions of African women - from Senegal to Kenya, from Mali to South Africa, from Niger to Malawi. A list of common concerns has emerged. These include: HIV-AIDS, domestic violence, the exploitation of girls employed as domestic servants, the lack of positive role models for women and girls, the economic potential of women through small business development, the negative consequences of child marriage, and the need for a more equal division of labour between men and women in the home. Each booklet describes one way of treating a subject of high priority to African women. In the process, the authors have attempted to render the material gender-sensitive. They have tried to present African women and girls and their families in the African context and view the issues and problems from their perspective. We hope these booklets will inspire readers, as they did their authors, to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face every day. The questions accompanying each booklet will help readers ask questions and find answers to some of the issues which also touch their own lives. How the characters in these booklets cope with specific situations, their trials and tribulations, can serve as lessons for women and men living together in 21st Century Africa. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    191608

    AIDS Medicines and Diagnostics Service (AMDS).

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. [2] p. (WHO/HIV/2003.21)

    The AMDS is a mechanism created to expand access to quality, effective treatment for HIV/AIDS by facilitating the increased supply of antiretrovirals (ARVs) and diagnostics in developing countries. The AMDS is the access and supply arm of UNAIDS/WHO 3 by 5 initiative, which aims to multiply eight-fold the number of people in poor countries receiving antiretroviral therapy by 2005. The AMDS builds on years of work by UNAIDS, WHO, UNICEF, the World Bank, and the global health community, as well as on some more recent initiatives, such as that by the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria, to address the AIDS treatment gap in developing countries. It brings together stakeholders and partners, pooling their capacities, in order to maximize impact towards meeting the 3 by 5 goal as rapidly as possible. The AMDS will be one of a trio of mechanisms, with secretariats housed at WHO, to improve access to treatment for HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    182670

    Afghanistan. "Killing you is a very easy thing for us": human rights abuses in southeast Afghanistan.

    Sifton J; Coursen-Neff Z

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2003 Jul. 102 p. (Vol. 15, No. 5(C))

    This report, based on research conducted from January through June 2003, documents human rights abuses in the southeast of Afghanistan, the most densely populated part of Afghanistan. If allowed to continue with impunity, these abuses will make it impossible for Afghans to create a modern, democratic state. Although many observers have noted the harmful effects of chronic insecurity in Afghanistan, few have sufficiently appreciated the extent to which continuing insecurity, at its heart, is due to policies and depredations of local government actors. Human Rights Watch found evidence of government involvement or complicity in abuses in virtually every district in the southeast. These include the provinces of Kabul, Wardak, Ghazni, Logar, Paktia, Paktika, Laghman, Nangarhar, Kapisa, and Kunar. The three main types of abuse documented in this report are violent criminal offenses—armed robbery, extortion, and kidnappings—committed by army troops, police, and intelligence agents; governmental attacks on media and political actors; and violations of the human rights of women and girls. Many of these violations are preventable, but solutions will require the concerted attention and action of international and Afghan authorities alike, which to date has not been sufficiently forthcoming. The report details specific accounts of the daily abuses suffered by Afghans: farmers in Paghman district in Kabul province staying awake at night in shifts to guard their property from thieving soldiers and police; bus and taxi drivers from Gardez in Paktia province being hijacked or beaten for not paying bribes to soldiers and police; people in Jalalabad being arbitrarily arrested by police or soldiers, accused of bogus crimes or “being a member of the Taliban,” and freed only after they or their family pay a ransom. It documents arbitrary arrests of and death threats against journalists by intelligence agents, police, and army officials, and detentions and intimidation of political opponents by government forces. It explains that many girls in areas such as Ghazni and Paghman are still unable go to school, and why women in areas such as Laghman fear attacks by local armed men if they speak about or promote women’s rights. These abuses are impeding the delivery of humanitarian aid and keeping some refugees and internally displaced persons from returning to their homes. The accumulation of cases, from an array of districts, demonstrates the problem’s pervasiveness and urgency. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    115250

    Communication for development report, 1994-1995.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]. Sustainable Development Department. Research, Extension and Training Division. Communication for Development Branch

    Rome, Italy, FAO, 1995. 83 p.

    The introduction to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO's) Communication for Development Branch's report of activities for 1994 and 1995 notes that restructuring has occurred, which places the branch in the Research, Extension, and Training Division of a newly created Sustainable Development Department. Because the other divisions in the department are concerned with rural development, agrarian reform, women and people's participation, and the environment, this restructuring will allow such problems as food security, conservation of natural resources, and income generation to be approached in a coordinated, holistic manner. The restructuring also represents formal recognition of the technical nature of activities that fall under the heading "communication for development." This report records the Communication for Development Branch's activities for 1994 and 1995 by highlighting some of the innovative communication techniques that are being pioneered in various projects. Important goals of the branch have been to emphasize radio and traditional communication, to establish electronic information systems that can be managed by their users, to help governments create national communication for development policies, to help national rural development communications institutions to become financially self-sufficient, and to further the integration of communication into the FAO's technical activities. The various projects are presented by country for the regions of Africa, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and the Near East. Multimedia materials and publications produced during this period are listed as are other recent productions of the branch.
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  16. 16
    106151

    [Female genital mutilation in France] Mutilations sexuelles feminines en France.

    Mouvement Francais pour le Planning Familial [MFPF]. Centre de Documentation

    Paris, France, MFPF, 1993 Jun. ii, 73 p. (Dossier Documentaire)

    The French Movement for Family Planning (MFPF) has compiled documents on female genital mutilation in France. The documents are presented with an introduction entitled Excision in Law and four sections addressing the last excision trials in France; action of the public powers; in the UK, family planning action and of IPPF; trials for excision in January and February 1993 (facts across the press); and family planning in Mali fighting against sexual mutilation. Interspersed in these sections are witness accounts, indictments, and counsel's speech. Some titles of newspaper and magazine articles in the MFPF collection include Five Years in Prison for Excision (Le Monde); For the First Time in France, an African is Condemned to a Year on a Prison Farm for Having Her Daughters Excised (Le Monde); Excision: The Pain of the Innocents (Nouvel Observateur); and Excision: The Word of Cut Women (Marie-Claire). The MFPF collection presents an IPPF report called Restoring to Women their Life Space which is about female genital mutilation. The collection ends with an interview in the Bulletin of the Malian Association for Family Planning (AMPPF) with an obstetrician-gynecologist serving on the AMPPF executive board who addresses excision and other traditional practices.
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  17. 17
    102109

    Breastfeeding information resources: an international listing of sources of resource materials and organisations.

    Appropriate Health Resources and Technologies Action Group [AHRTAG]

    London, England, AHRTAG, [1994]. [2], 93 p. (AHRTAG Resource List)

    This breast feeding resource list is divided into 2 main sections. In the first section, resource materials are arranged according to the following categories: 1) reference materials and policy documents; 2) training materials and practical resources; 3) newsletters and journals; 4) posters, flannelgraphs, and flash cards; and 5) audiovisuals, including videos, films, radio scripts, and slide sets. In each section, the resources are listed alphabetically in language groupings (most are in English). Each listing describes the content, the target audience (if available), the name of the organization or individual producing it, the price (where given), and availability. The second section lists organizations involved in supporting breast feeding. These organizations have been grouped according to the following World Health Organization (WHO) regions: Eastern Mediterranean, Europe, Africa, the Americas, Southeast Asia, and Western Pacific. International and regional organizations are listed first within each region, followed by national and local organizations which are listed by country. In addition to contact information, the purpose of the organization and its main activities are given. Appended to this document are 1) the WHO/UNICEF International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes, 2) a description of the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, 3) information on World Breast Feeding Week, 4) a listing of available training courses, 5) a list of the countries in each WHO region, and 6) a list of organizations grouped by WHO region.
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  18. 18
    097773

    The Russian Family Planning Association.

    Russian Family Planning Association [RFPA]

    Moscow, Russia, RFPA, [1993]. [6] p.

    This pamphlet describes the goals and activities of the Russian Family Planning Association (RFPA) and its relationship with IPPF. The Russian government supports RFPA, but it is nonetheless a voluntary public organization. RFPA's goals include improvement of reproductive health, particularly among youth, and reduction of the rates of abortion and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Its activities revolve around promotion of family planning and modern contraception, sex education for youth, helping youth through medical and psychological counseling on sexual health and contraception, increasing awareness of safe sex and reproductive health care, family planning training for medical and nonmedical professionals, and setting up RFPA branches in Russia and supporting their efforts. In 1993, RFPA branches and units operated in the regions of Altay, Archangel, Ivanovo, Leningrad, Krasnodar, Magadan, Moscow, Novosibirsk, Primorsky, Rjazan, Samara, Sakhalin, Sverdlovsk, Smolensk, Stavropol, Tomsk, Tula, Udmurtia, Uljanovsk, and Khabarovsk; the cities of Miass, Orsk, and Surgut; and the republics of Burjatia and Carelia. RFPA works with state and public groups addressing family and youth sex education. It distributes IPPF publications on sex education and family planning; an international medical journal; and films, TV, and radio programs. RFPA arranges for eminent national and international family planning specialists to conduct seminar and training all over Russia. A training center operates out of RFPA headquarters in Moscow. RFPA is creating a computer data bank on family planning and reproductive health. It has established a network of its branches that follow sociodemographic, cultural, and national characteristics of Russian territories. RFPA adheres to the ideology and strategies of IPPF.
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  19. 19
    070676

    Programme review and strategy development report: Ecuador.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Technical and Evaluation Division; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Latin America and the Caribbean Division

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1989]. ix, 78 p.

    The UN Population Fund, in cooperation with the Government of Ecuador, initiated a programme Review and Strategy Development (PRSD) exercise in July-August 1989. The results are presented in sections such as national population policy, institutional structure, environment, women, research and training, education, communication, health nongovernmental organizations, and outside technical cooperation, each shown in the format issue, objective(s), and strategy. The Ecuadoran government views the growth rate of 2.8% as manageable, and has a qualitative population policy stated as political goals, with an addendum that addresses a few issues such as women in development. Adequate quantitative and focused data on population and development are lacking. Similarly, national, public, and private institutions are not coordinated and would benefit by regular meetings and information networks. Systematic integration of population and development must begin with policy formulation, planning, and research on rural and urban growth and migration. Health services, now emphasizing individual curative care, must be targeted to women, adolescents, and children, by integrating comprehensive family planning and primary health care. Poor performance of prior maternal-child health/family planning programs must be improved. Suggested strategies include building institutions, improving the information system, dispelling myths about contraceptive methods, informing people about the relationship between family planning and health, and broadening population education. There is potential for population education in literacy and informal education programs for workers and women, and there is a need for enlightenment of journalists and media communicators about population and migration issues. Efforts for improvement of women's lives are nonfocused and fragmented: information on these projects must be systematized, and a policy on women should be consolidated.
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  20. 20
    040281

    [Workshop on Sensitization of Communication Professionals to Population Problems, Dakar, 29 August, 1986 at Breda] Seminaire atelier de sensibilisation des professionnels de la communication aux problemes de population, Dakar du 25 au 29 Aout 1986 au Breda.

    Senegal. Ministere du Plan et de la Cooperation

    Dakar, Senegal, UNICOM, Unite de Communication, 1986. 215 p. (Unite de Communication Projet SEN/81/P01)

    This document is the result of a workshop organized by the Communication Unit of the Senegalese Ministry of Planning and Cooperation to sensitize some 30 Senegalese journalists working in print and broadcast media to the importance of the population variable in development and to prepare them to contribute to communication programs for population. Although it is addressed primarily to professional communicators, it should also be of interest to educators, economists, health workers, demographers, and others interested in the Senegalese population. The document is divided into 5 chapters, the 1st of which comprises a description of the history and objectives of the Communication Unit, which is funded by the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). Chapter 1 also presents the workshop agenda. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to population problems and different currents of thought regarding population since Malthus, a discussion of the utilization and interpretation of population variables, and definitions of population indicators. The 3rd chapter explores problems of population and development in Senegal, making explicit the theoretical concepts of the previous chapter in the context of Senegal. Topics discussed in chapter 3 include the role of UNFPA in introducing the population variable in development projects in Senegal; population and development, the situation and trends of the Senegalese population; socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the Senegalese population; sources of sociodemographic data on Senegal; the relationship between population, resources, environment and development in Senegal; and the Senegalese population policy. Chapter 4 discusses population communication, including population activities of UNESCO and general problems of social communication; a synthesis and interpretation of information needs and the role of population communication; and a summary of the workshop goals, activities, and achievements. Chapter 5 contains annexes including a list of participants, opening and closing remarks, an evaluation questionnaire regarding the workshop participants, and press clippings relating to the workshop and to Senegal's population.
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  21. 21
    020382

    Report of the Working Group on Communications Aspects of Family Planning Programmes.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East [ECAFE]

    In: United Nations. Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East [ECAFE]. Report of the Working Group on Communications Aspects of Family Programmes and selected papers. Held at Singapore, 5-15 September 1967. Bangkok, Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East, [1968]. 1-68. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 3)

    The objective of the Working Group on Communications Aspects of Family Planning Programs, meeting during September 1967, was to collate, examine, and evaluate the collective experience in the region of the use of communications media in family planning programs and to try to develop a basic model for using communications to provide information and motivation in family planning programs as an aid to governmental action in this field. Other purposes were: to evolve appropriate guidelines for operational research and evaluation of family planning communication programs; to discuss the best ways in which the family planning communication work can be strengthened through regional cooperation under the aegis of the Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East (ECAFE); and to seek practical methods of continuing the exchange and pooling of data in the communication effort within the region and from other areas. 20 participants from 13 member countries participated. This report of the Working Group covers the following: national development and family planning; communications in the context of family planning programs (types of communication; objectives of family planning communications; specific functions of family planning communications; target audiences, groups, and individuals; messages; media and materials; staff; and costs); general guidelines for family planning communication programs; communication programs in countries of the ECAFE region (Ceylon, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand); communications media and methods (radio and television, films, newspapers and other printed materials, hoardings and display signs, posters, exhibitions, campaigns, mailings, face to face communications); communication aspects of special significance; practical aspects of a communication organization; production and distribution of communication materials; specialized training for communications; and research and evaluation. Generally, communications about family planning are of 2 types: informal, characterized as being spontaneous, unplanned; and formal communications, those that are planned, organized, intended to serve specific purposes. Family planning communications serve several purposes. Among them are those of informing, educating, motivating, and reassuring large numbers and varieties of people and of legitimating the practice of family planning. The information component of family planning communications will be directed toward individuals, groups, or the public both within the family planning organization and outside it.
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  22. 22
    168421

    The light is ours: memoirs and movements.

    Wadia AB

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 2001. xiv, 706 p.

    This book is collection of personal memoirs of Avabai Wadia, a long-time family planning (FP) advocate. Wadia describes the beginnings of the FP movement in India and the international networks that led to the formation of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), now the world's largest voluntary organization in the field of sexual and reproductive health. Launched in 2001, the International Year of the Volunteer, this book also illustrates the vision behind volunteering, and the instincts of the millions of volunteers who support IPPF.
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  23. 23
    166166

    Aid to poor countries. Knowledge is power. [Aide aux pays pauvres. Savoir c'est pouvoir]

    Economist. 2002 Mar 30-Apr 5; 362(8266):40-1.

    In March 2002, the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) published the third edition of the book entitled, "Facts for Life," a basic health handbook aimed at poor people. Since its first edition in 1989, more than 15 million copies have been printed and distributed in some 215 different languages. The material from "Facts for Life" has been used in radio and television programs, newspaper and magazine supplements, distributed as pamphlets and radio cassettes, incorporated into school textbooks and adapted for comic strips, soap operas and theater groups. Both the cost and effectiveness of this book are impossible to measure exactly because of the variety of ways in which the book and materials have been disseminated. Through its collaborative effort, UNICEF has been instrumental to the success of "Facts for Life." It is noted that the book itself is designed with input from poor people themselves, to make sure it answers their most urgent questions.
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  24. 24
    145646

    Scotland: inequalities in women's reproductive health.

    World Health Organization Collaborating Centre in Women's Health, Glasgow

    ENTRE NOUS. 1999 Summer-Autumn; (43-44):5-6.

    This document reports a detailed information on the link between women's poverty and the provision of health care services in Glasgow, Scotland. Glasgow, Scotland was known as the second city of the British Empire and in spite of its wealth, a great number of its population suffers from poverty. In the 1990s, as a response to the inadequate health services provided to the impoverished women, the Family Planning and Sexual Health Directorate included the health needs of the city's female population. It emphasized three main areas of care: improved access, preventive health, and promotion of women's well-being. Seventeen model well-women clinics were conceived to provide a better access, and experts played an active part in the delivery of prioritized health issues through an educational program. An open-ended consultation on major health issues and discrete referral were utilized for the promotion of the women's emotional well-being. "Women Talking" mini-mags produced in 1993 which tackles issues relevant to women's health and the Women's Reproductive Health Services provide multidisciplinary approach offering reproductive health care to women who have social and health problems. This strategic response of Glasgow to these women had facilitated awareness on the links between the social and economic factors, and a confirmation that a continued availability of such appropriate services would prove beneficial to women with severe social problems.
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  25. 25
    133354

    Leading the way. 1997 annual report.

    Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States [SIECUS]

    New York, New York, SIECUS, 1997. [16] p.

    This document, the 1997 annual report of the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS), opens with a message from the Chair that notes that SIECUS's new strategic plan will focus on the sexuality needs of people in mid- and later life; the relationship between religion, spirituality, and sexuality; media advocacy; the integration of sexuality concerns in health care systems; and the pre-service training of teachers. Next, a message from the president of SIECUS pointed out that, in 1997, SIECUS led the opposition to the new federal abstinence-until-marriage program in welfare reform. The report then reviews SIECUS's activities in the field of information dissemination, including its library, publications, and Web site. The report continues with a look at SIECUS's educational efforts in the areas of HIV/AIDS prevention, community advocacy, and outreach to underserved communities. Next, the report describes work in the international arena, including culturally-specific adaptations of SIECUS publications, major addresses to international conferences, publication of the SIECUS Report, additions to the international clearinghouse, and country-specific Web pages. The report then outlines the public policy efforts of the organization with a focus on creation of the National Coalition to Support Sexuality Education, presentations, media coverage, work with coalitions and policy-makers, and the advocates network. The report ends by listing the members of the Board and staff and offering a financial statement.
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