Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    350203
    Peer Reviewed

    Unintended pregnancy: worldwide levels, trends, and outcomes.

    Singh S; Sedgh G; Hussain R

    Studies In Family Planning. 2010 Dec; 41(4):241-50.

    Unintended pregnancy can carry serious consequences for women and their families. We estimate the incidence of pregnancy by intention status and outcome at worldwide, regional, and subregional levels for 2008, and we assess recent trends since 1995. Numbers of births are based on United Nations estimates. Induced abortions are estimated by projecting from recent trends. A model-based approach is used to estimate miscarriages. The planning status of births is estimated using nationally representative and small-scale surveys of 80 countries. Of the 208 million pregnancies that occurred in 2008, we estimate that 41 percent were unintended. The unintended pregnancy rate fell by 29 percent in developed regions and by 20 percent in developing regions. The highest unintended pregnancy rates were found for Eastern and Middle Africa and the lowest for Southern and Western Europe and Eastern Asia. North America is the only region in which overall and unintended pregnancy rates have not declined. We conclude with a brief discussion of global and regional program and policy implications.
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  2. 2
    189802
    Peer Reviewed

    Combined estimates of effectiveness of mifepristone 10 mg in emergency contraception.

    Piaggio G; Heng Z; von Hertzen H; Xiao B; Cheng L

    Contraception. 2003 Dec; 68(6):439-446.

    The present paper combines the estimates of efficacy and side effects of 10 mg mifepristone for emergency contraception obtained from randomized trials. A total of 6083 women participating in 12 randomized trials and receiving 10 mg mifepristone for emergency contraception up to 120 h after intercourse, were analyzed for efficacy. Between 4188 and 5833 women were analyzed for side effects and 3601 for delay of menses of more than 7 days. Prevented fractions, the effect of delay and of further acts of intercourse after treatment administration were analyzed in 3440 women, using individual data. The combined pregnancy rate from all the 12 trials was 1.7% [101/6083, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3–2.2]. From the three trials providing individual data, the combined pregnancy rate was 1.3% (45/3440, 95% CI: 0.9 –1.7) and the estimate of pregnancies prevented was 83.4% (95% CI: 77.4–87.8). There was a sharp decline in efficacy when treatment was administered during the 5th day after intercourse compared to administration during the 1st day, the odds of pregnancy increasing by a factor of 5.3 (95% CI: 1.9 –14.9). The relative risk of pregnancy was about 28 times higher among women with unprotected acts of coitus between treatment administration and the onset of next menses, compared with women reporting none [odds ratio (OR) = 27.6, 95% CI: 12.7– 60.2]. The increase in risk for women reporting protected acts of intercourse during this interval was not statistically significant (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 0.9 –3.8). There was a large heterogeneity among trials in all side effects and delay of menses of more than 7 days (all had p < 0.0001 for the test of homogeneity). The percentage of women with nausea ranged from 0.0–19.4% (highest upper 95% confidence limit: 23.0%), that of vomiting from 0.0–4.3% (highest upper 95% confidence limit: 6.1%), that of lower abdominal pain from 4.3–19.1% (highest upper 95% confidence limit: 22.7%). The percentage of women with delay of menses of more than 7 days ranged from 4.3–25.8% (highest upper 95% confidence limit: 34.1%). We conclude that 10 mg mifepristone is an effective emergency contraception regimen, with an acceptable side-effects profile. Postponing treatment until the 5th day seriously decreases efficacy. The risk of pregnancy is dramatically increased among women having unprotected acts of intercourse between treatment administration and the onset of next menses. This risk may be enhanced for women whose ovulation is postponed by treatment. (author's)
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  3. 3
    272300

    A randomized comparative study of interval insertion of three intrauterine devices: the copper T 220c, the Nova T and the WHO levonorgestrel 2 ug IUD.

    Gao J; Wu SC; Song GY; Miao L; Cheng JH; Sun HZ

    [Unpublished] 1985 May. 5 p. (Project: 82901)

    The objective is to compare the effectiveness and acceptability of 3 IUDs inserted in 300 health women, aged 24-38. All have had at least 1 full-term delivery. Subjects were randomly allocated to 1 of the 3 IUDS: the Copper T 220C (Tcu 220c), the Nova T, and the World Health Organization levonorgestrel 2 ug IUD. Insertion was done from the 3rd to the 5th day of menstruation between Feb. and Sept. 1984 and followed up at 48 hours, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after IUD insertion. 12 month data was collected for cumulative rates, based on life table procedures and analyzed with log-rank test. There was no loss to follow up and no insertion failure. All levonorgestrel IUDs have been removed because the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD has a relatively high risk of ectopic pregnancy. The use-related discontinuation rates of Tcu 220c, Nova T, and levonorgestrel IUD during 12 months of use, were 11.1, 2.4, and 12.7, respectively. The difference between Tcu 220c and Nova T were statistically significant (p.<0.01). The continuation rates of Tcu 220c, Nova T, and levonorgestrel during 6 months of use were 94.0, 99.0, and 96.0, respectively. During 12 months of use, they were 88.9, 97.6, and 87.3 respectively. 1 ectopic pregnancy occurred with the levonorgestrel IUD after 7 months of use. No pregnancy occurred in Nova T users. The pregnancy rates of Tcu 220c and levonorgestrel IUD during 12 months of use were 1.0 and 1.3, respectively. Removal rates for bleeding with Tcu 220c and levonorgestrel IUD during 12 months of use were 3.1 and 1.0, respectively. The removal rate for pain with Tcu 220c during 12 months of use was 2.0. The duration of bleeding and spotting with 3 IUDs, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of use are illustrated. Preliminary results show that the Nova T is superior to Tcu 220c and levonorgestrel IUDs. Expulsion is the main event in both Nova T and Tcu 220c. More attention should be paid to the insertion technique. The duration of bleeding and spotting of levonorgestrel IUD were longer in the last 3 months after insertion, but was shortest at 1 year of use when compared with Tcu 220c and Nova T.
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  4. 4
    028322

    The Billings method of family planning: an assessment.

    Betts K

    Studies in Family Planning. 1984 Nov-Dec; 15(6/1):253-66.

    This paper critically analyzes claims for the effectiveness of the Billings method of natural family planning and raises questions about the wisdom of actively promoting this method. The Billings method, developed in Australia, is based on client interpretation of changing patterns of cervical mucus secretion. Evaluation of the method's use-effectiveness has been hindered by its supporters' insistence on distinguishing between method and user failures and by the unreliability of data on sexual activities. However, the findings in 5 large studies aimed at investigating the biological basis of the Billings method provide little support for the claims that most fertile women always experience mucus symptoms, that these symptoms precede ovulation by at least 5 days, and that a peak symptom coincides with the day of ovulation. Although many women do experience a changing pattern of mucus symptoms, these changes do not mark the fertile period with sufficient reliability to form the basis for a fully effective method of fertility control. In addition, the results of 5 major field trials indicate that the Billings method has a biological failure rate even higher than the symptothermal method. Pearl pregnancy rates ranged from 22.2-37.2/100 woman-years, and high discontinuation rates in both developed and developing countries were found. Demand for the method was low even in developing countries where calendar rhythm and withdrawal are relatively popular methods of fertility control, suggesting that women of low socioeconomic status may prefer a method that does not require demanding interaction with service providers and acknowledgment of sexual activity. The Billings method is labor-intensive, requiring repeated client contact over an extended time period and high administrative costs, even when teachers are volunteers. It is concluded that although natural family planning methods may make a useful contribution where more effective methods are unavailable or unacceptable, many of the claims made for the Billings method are unsubstantiated by scientific evidence.
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  5. 5
    037581

    Long-acting Progestasert IUD systems.

    Edelman DA; Cole LP; Apelo R; Lavin P

    In: Zatuchni GI, Goldsmith A, Shelton JD, Sciarra JJ, ed. Long-acting contraceptive delivery systems. Philadelphia, Pa., Harper and Row, 1984. 621-7. (PARFR Series on Fertility Regulation)

    Progestasert (Alza Corporation, Palo Alto, California) achieves relatively high rates of contraceptive effectiveness through the release of a sex hormone--progesterone. Currently, it is recommended that Progestaserts be replaces every 12 months and most copper-bearing IUDs, every 3 years. To improve on Progestasert's 1-year replacement interval, Alza Corporation modified the Progestasert by increasing the amount of pregesterone contained in the IUD (from 38 to 52 mg) without changing the average daily release of 65mg. This long-acting progestasert, called the Intrauterine Progesterone Contraceptive System (IPCS), was designed to have a useful life of 3 years before replacement was required. The IPCS is identical in appearance to the Progestasert, and its contraceptive action in the same as that of the Progestasert. The effectiveness of either is through the effects of an intrauterine foreign body and through the effects of the progesterone on the encometrium. The IPCS system was designed to provide maximum contraceptive protection over a 3-year period and to reduce IUD-related bleeding, pain, and expulsion problems. Results from Alza monitored trials of the IPCS in the US and Mexico indicate that the cumulative life-table pregnancy rate increased from 3.6/100 women after 25 to 30 months of use to 10.6/100 women after 30 to 36 months of use. Laboratory evaluations of removed IPCS devices indicates that after 30 months of IPCS use the release rate of progesterone may not be adequate to prevent pregnancy effectively. The World Health Organization (WHO) evaluated the IPCS in 2 multiclinic studies. Postinsertion complications and complaints for the IPCS and T Cu-200 are shown. The include cervical perforation, ectopic pregnancy, pelvic inflammatory disease, dysmenorrhea, bleeding, spotting, and pelvic pain. The IPCS seemingly offers no particular advantages for use in developing countries.
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