Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    337995

    WHO recommendations on interventions to improve preterm birth outcomes. Highlights and key messages from the World Health Organization's 2015 Global Recommendations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Maternal and Child Survival Program

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2015 Aug. [6] p. (WHO/RHR/15.16; WHO/MCA/15.02; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This evidence brief provides highlights and key messages from World Health Organization’s 2015 recommendations on interventions to improve preterm birth outcomes. The brief summarizes the recommended practices to improve the quality of care related to preterm birth and the outcomes for preterm infants. Additionally, justifications and policy implications associated with the recommendations are outlined. This brief is intended for policy-makers, programme managers, educators and health care providers.
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  2. 2
    337958

    WHO recommendations on interventions to improve preterm birth outcomes. Evidence base.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015. [162] p. (WHO/RHR/15.17)

    This document presents the evidence base supporting the WHO recommendations on interventions to improve preterm birth outcomes in tabular form with over 50 tables presenting data on the interventions and their variations.
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  3. 3
    337957

    WHO recommendations on interventions to improve preterm birth outcomes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015. [108] p.

    The present guideline is focused on interventions that could be provided during pregnancy, labour and during the newborn period with the aim of improving outcomes for preterm infants. Recommendations on interventions to prevent and reduce the risk of preterm birth or modify risk in at-risk pregnant women are outside the scope of this guideline.The primary audience for this guideline includes health-care professionals who are responsible for developing national and local health-care protocols and policies, as well as managers of maternal and child health programmes and policy-makers in all settings. The guideline will also be useful to those directly providing care to pregnant women and preterm infants, such as obstetricians, paediatricians, midwives, nurses and general practitioners. The information in this guideline will be useful for developing job aids and tools for pre- and in-service training of health workers to enhance their delivery of maternal and neonatal care relating to preterm birth. (Excerpts)
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  4. 4
    288358

    Who is eligible to use the different types of contraceptives?

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Progress in Reproductive Health Research. 2005; (68):2-3.

    Service providers need to know what choice of contraceptive methods they can offer to clients, and what medical conditions or personal characteristics might make use of a particular method more of a health risk. While the final specification of criteria for medical eligibility has to be made at country and programme level, to take into account the local situation and setting, WHO’s broad recommendations provide a sound basis for decision-making. The third edition of Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use, published in 2004, contains some 1700 recommendations, organized by method of contraception and known pre-existing medical condition or individual characteristic. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    288359

    Safe and effective use of contraceptives.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Progress in Reproductive Health Research. 2005; (68):3-4.

    No contraceptive is both 100% effective and totally free of side-effects. In practice, therefore, the choice of a family planning method almost always involves a trade-off between the desired level of protection against pregnancy and the client’s willingness to tolerate the risks and disadvantages associated with any particular method. The level of protection for some methods, however, is a function not only of the method itself but also of how consistently and correctly it is used. Furthermore, the perceived disadvantages of certain methods can be overcome, or at least alleviated, through appropriate counselling. WHO’s Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use provide guidance on the use of contraceptives, with the goal of maximizing effectiveness and managing side-effects and other problems. The recommendations are not intended for direct application in countries. Rather, they should be used as a basis for the development of national and local guidelines that take into account existing policies, needs, priorities and resources. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    189167

    WHO antenatal care randomized trial: Manual for the implementation of the new model. [Estudio clínico aleatorizado de control prenatal de la OMS: Manual para la puesta en práctica del nuevo modelo]

    Villar J; Bergsjo P

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2002. 33 p.

    This manual describes the basic component of the new WHO antenatal care model. It provides detailed instructions on how to conduct the four-visit schedule of the basic component of the new WHO model. It includes a classifying form for easy assessment of a woman’s eligibility for the basic component, and provides a checklist of activities that are to be performed throughout the four-visit schedule. It is important to emphasize that the basic component of the new WHO antenatal care model is intended only for the management of pregnant women who do not have evidence of pregnancy-related complications, medical conditions or major health-related risk factors. For the management of women who have such conditions, health providers are advised to follow the recommended established procedures of their clinic or hospital. The clinics or hospitals that do not have established procedures for women with such conditions, or that wish to update the ones they currently have, can use The WHO Reproductive Health Library to identify evidence-based interventions. (author's)
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