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  1. 1
    296489

    WHO predicts dramatic rise in global AIDS toll - World Health Organization.

    d'Adesky A

    UN Chronicle. 1990 Dec; 27(4):[4] p..

    An estimated 8 to 10 million people globally will contract the human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) that causes the acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the next 10 years, a new study by the World Health Organization (WHO) predicts. That figure marks a significant and alarming rise of 2 million more people than WHO's projections last year. Equally dramatic are statistics showing that HIV is spreading fast among women and children in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. An estimated 3 million women will develop AIDS in the 1990s and at least 80 per cent are in sub-Saharan Africa, WHO suggested. By the end of 1992, there will be 1 million HIV-infected children born to these women. AIDS will become the leading cause of death of women aged 20 to 40 in some cities of central Africa. "It's obvious that HIV infection is continuing to spread very rapidly in parts of the world like central Africa, where AIDS is having a devastating impact on individual countries", said Dr. Michael H. Merson, Director of WHO's Global Programme on AIDS (GPA), in a recent interview. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    296466

    Commission gives high priority to monitoring global trends - UN Population Commission meeting, Mar 28-31, 1994 - includes information on preparation of action program to be recommended at the Sep 5-13, 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, Egypt.

    UN Chronicle. 1994 Jun; 31(2):[3] p..

    The effect of population growth on the environment, the role and status of women, and the demographic implications of development Policies were among major topics discussed by the Population Commission at its twenty-seventh session (28-31 March, New York). "The most important lesson we have learned is that population growth and other demographic trends can only be affected by investing in people and by promoting equality between women and men", Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) and Secretary-General of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, told the 26-member body. In the single text approved during the session, for adoption by the Economic and Social Council, the Commission asked that high priority be given to monitoring world population trends and policies, and to strengthening multilateral technical cooperation to address population concerns. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    111014
    Peer Reviewed

    The third age, the Third World and the third millennium.

    Diczfalusy E

    CONTRACEPTION. 1996 Jan; 53(1):1-7.

    In the year 2000, world population will exceed 6200 million and life expectancy will be over 68 years. The UN population projections for the coming 20 years after 1996 range from a low of 7100 million to a high of 7800 million. Between 1950 and 1992, in developing countries, life expectancy at birth increased by 29 years in China, by 24 years in India and Indonesia, by 21 years in Bangladesh, and by 16 years in Brazil. The gender difference in life expectancy is only 1 year in India, but 6 years in a number of developed countries. Corresponding increases in Australia were from 12.2 to 14.7 years for men and from 14.9 to 18.8 years for women. By the year 2025, the UN projects that the elderly (65 years and older) will constitute 10% of the population in Asia and more than 20% in North America and Europe, whereas 1.8% of the population of Asia, 4.6% of North America, and 6.4% of Europe will be very old (80 years and older). By the year 2030, there may be 1200 million postmenopausal women around the world, 76% of them in the developing countries. During the period 1990-2025 the elderly population of Sweden will increase by 33%, whereas that of Indonesia will increase by 414%. Between 2000 and 2100, the global population aged 15 years or younger will gradually decrease from 31.4% to 18.3%, while the population aged 65 and over will increase from 6.8% to 21.6%. The persistence of poverty in developing countries combined with aging poses a formidable challenge because the majority of old people receive little special support. The epidemiological dimension of aging embraces mortality and morbidity. Each year 39 million people die in the developing world mainly from infectious and parasitic diseases, noncommunicable and communicable diseases, and injuries. In the developed countries 11 million die primarily from cardiovascular diseases and malignant neoplasms. In the developing countries noncommunicable diseases represent 87% of the disease burden resulting in increased isolation of the elderly. The ethical dilemma facing health care is poverty among the elderly.
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  4. 4
    076548

    1991 ESCAP population data sheet.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population Division

    Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP, Population Division, 1991. [1] p.

    The 1991 Population Data Sheet produced by the UN Economic and social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) provides a large chart by country and region for Asia and the Pacific for the following variables: mid-1991 population, average annual growth rate, crude birth rate, crude death rate, total fertility rate, infant mortality rate, male life expectancy at birth, female life expectancy at birth, % aged 0-14 years, % aged 65 and over, dependency ratios, density, % urban, and population projection at 2010. 3 charts also display urban and rural population trends between 1980 and 2025, the crude birth and death rates and rate of natural increase by region, and dependency ratios for 27 countries.
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  5. 5
    066859

    Paediatric AIDS cases send estimates soaring.

    BULLETIN OF THE INTERNATIONAL UNION AGAINST TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG DISEASE. 1990 Dec; 65(4):75.

    WHO estimates of pediatric AIDS cases are 400,000 by September 1990, not including 300,000 who have already died. WHO projects that 10 million or more infants and children will have HIV infections by 2000, in addition to 25-30 million adults. The primary mode of transmission in most countries is heterosexual contact, resulting in a rapidly increasing prevalence in women of childbearing age. WHO predicts that pediatric AIDS will be a major, and in some countries the predominant, cause of death in children in the 1990s. Even though child survival programs have made progress recently, by immunization and diarrhea control, the fruits of these efforts are expected to be reversed. The world's cumulative total of HIV infected women is about 3 million. In the U.S., 20,000 infants have been born to infected mothers. In contrast, in Eastern Europe, about 1000 children are infected, mostly from unscreened blood transfusions and unsterilized needles and syringes. The impact of childhood AIDS is expected to be an increase in child mortality by 50% in many developing countries. Serious social repercussions for children also stem from projected 10 million uninfected children orphaned by AIDS, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. The only way to lessen this tragedy is for people to protect themselves by practicing safe sex and having sexually transmitted diseases treated.
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  6. 6
    005293

    Population projections, 1980-2000 and long-term (stationary population). [tables]

    Zachariah KC; Vu MT; Elwan A

    [Washington, D.C., International Bank for Reconstruction and Development], 1981 Jul. 375 p.

    Population projections -- 1980-2000 and long-term (stationary population) are presented in tables for Africa, the United States and Canada, Latin America, Asia, Europe, and Oceania. The base year for the projection of base total population and age/sex composition is 1980. The total population in 1980 was taken from a variety of sources, but the principal source was the United Nations Population Division -- "World Population Trends and Prospects by Country, 1950-2025: Summary Report of the 1980 Assessment, 1980", a computer printout. The base year mortality levels used in the projection of mortality level and trend are in general the same as those used in the recent United Nations projections. The principal source of the base fertility rates was also the revised United Nations population projections. Throughout the projections it was assumed that international migration would have no appreciable impact. Population projection was prepared separately for every country in the world. Since many countries reached stability only after 175 years of projection, the results of the projection are presented at 5-year intervals for the 1980-2000 period and at 25 year intervals thereafter. For each of the 165 separate units, the following information is presented in the accompanying tables: population by sex and 5-year age groups; birth rate, death rate, and rate of natural increase; gross reproduction rate, total fertility rate; expectation of life at birth and infant mortality rates for males and females separately; and net reproduction rates. According to this projection the total world population would increase from 4.416 billion in 1980 to 6.114 billion in the year 2000. The average growth rate during 1980-2000 would be about 1.63% per year decreasing from 1.71% in 1980 to 1.42% in the year 2000. The birth rate would decline by 5 points and the death rate by 2 points. The share of the population in less developed regions would be 1.94% per year compared to 0.59% per year for more developed regions. The estimated hypothetical stationary population of the world according to the present projection is 10.1 billion.
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