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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    070172

    Saint Kitts and Nevis.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 54-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Saint Kitts and Nevis' 1985 population of 46,000 is projected to grow to 72,000 by the year 2025. The 1984 contraceptive prevalence rate was 40.6, and the urban population is expected to increase from 45.0% in 1985 to 71.4% overall by the year 2025. No specific data are presented on population age structure and growth, mortality, morbidity, fertility, and international migration. Insignificant levels of immigration and emigration, and overall spatial distribution are nonetheless considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, life expectancy at birth, and high fertility are not. Saint Kitts and Nevis has an explicit population policy. Its National Family Planning Program works to reduce fertility and population growth through the provision of family planning services, with specialized focus upon adolescent fertility. Population size historically focus upon adolescent fertility. Population size historically not varying by more than 10-15%, Saint Kitts and Nevis has maintained one of the few stable populations in the world. Health policy aims to reduce mortality and morbidity, and complements family planning and population policy with emphasis upon at risk and in need groups like mothers and children, adolescents, and the elderly. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  2. 2
    070162

    Papua New Guinea.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 14-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Papua New guinea's 1985 population of 3,511,000 is projected to grow to 8.601,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.6% were over the age of 60. 32.2% and 5.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 25.8 to 17.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 51.9 to 68.1 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 13.1 to 5.7, while infant mortality will decline from 74.0 to 22.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.7 to 2.7, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 38.8 to 22.7. No information is reported on the contraceptive prevalence rate and female mean age at 1st marriage. Urban population will increase from 14.3% in 1985 to 38.3% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, morbidity, and fertility are not. Papua New Guinea has an explicit population policy. Policies target the lowering of general and infant mortality, and the reduction of mortality differentials. Rural development programs have also been established to help check rural-urban migration. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematics demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  3. 3
    070159

    Oman.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 2-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Oman's 1985 population of 1,242,000 is projected to grow to 4,209,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 44.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.1% were over the age of 60. 38.0% and 5.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 33.1 to 23.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 52.3 to 71.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 14.6 to 4.9, while infant mortality will decline from 117.0 to 27.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.2 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 47.7 to 28.2. No information is reported on the contraceptive prevalence rate and female mean age at 1st marriage. Urban population will increase from 8.8% in 1985 to 31.6% overall by the year 2025. Fertility, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, morbidity, and immigration are not. Oman does not have an explicit population policy. Population issues have been more generally integrated into 5-year national development plans, with emphasis upon developing local human resources, and assuring equitable distribution of the nation's wealth to all segments of the population. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators.
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  4. 4
    038255

    Population growth and the cities of Asia.

    Laquian AA

    POPULI. 1986; 13(1):15-25.

    Over half of the 75 world cities projected to have populations exceeding 4 million by the year 2000 are in Asia. Asia's planners and city officials have developed and tested numerous policies and istruments for coping with rapid urban growth. These efforts have benefited from increased understanding of the demographic causes of urbanization, especially rural-urban migration. On an aggregate plane, the main consequences of urbanization have been metropolitanization, primacy, polarization, and centralization. Economic wealth, political power, and social status have become concentrated in capital cities; within cities, the increasing gap between privileged elites and impoverished masses has contributed to political radicalization among the poor. To cope with the problems of urbanization, many Asian authorities have set up metropolitan governments to handle area wide functions. Some cities have redefined their jurisdictions to incorporate outlying rural territories and small towns. The expansion of metropolitan jurisdiction prevents local government fragmentation and duplication of public services. It also allows for land-use controls over undeveloped areas that will be needed for urban expansion. In recent years, natural increase has been a more important factor in rapid urban growth than migration; thus, many Asian countries have adopted family planning programs to curb population growth. Most of the factors associated with declining fertility--educational achievement, employment of women, access to family planning services--are closely associated with urban culture, and urban fertility rates tend to be lower than those in rural areas. To be valid, urban policy goals must be integrated into broader development goals. Population issues permeate all stages of the planning process and should be viewed both as a cause and a consequence of economic and social development.
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  5. 5
    022863

    National migration surveys. X. Guidelines for analyses.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    New York, United Nations, 1982. 345 p. (Comparative Study on Migration, Urbanization and Development in the ESCAP Region. Survey Manuals)

    In the developing countries of the Asian and Pacific region, migration and urbanization are major policy issues. To assist countries in confronting these issues the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) has undertaken the design of a model national migration survey that will generate the types of information deemed of most use to national policymakers. This volume's purpose is to outline some of the principal techniques and approaches that can be applied to the data collected through the model. The introductory chapter highlights the types of information that can be generated from the model to see how these relate to the major issues in migration research and to provide the background and summaries of the analytical chapters that follow. The 12 chapters of this volume deal with various aspects of the analysis of migration in relation to development. These include discussions on aspects of policy implementation, measurement of spatial flows, the interrelationship between census and survey data, the causes and impacts of migration, and projections of future flows. The chapter devoted to the ESCAP national migration surveys and the development of population redistribution policies provides an overview of how the various aspects of population mobility systems revealed by the migration surveys can prove useful for policy formulation and remedy current deficiencies in data necessary for planning. In a chapter on identification and measurement of spatial population movements an attempt is made to develop a typology of population mobility based on a space-time continuum framework, but the recorded statistics of population mobility are restricted to discrete spatial units and discrete time intervals. The chapter dealing with techniques for analysis of migration history data emphasizes the usefulness of the life history approach and how it can be used in the analysis of the most important topics in migration research such as changes in the pattern of movement over time and the determinants and consequences of migration. One chapter focuses on subjectively expressed motivations for moving, examining the strengths and weaknesses of self assessed motivations. Subsequent chapters show that the national migration survey model has the potential to provide data to evaluate the conditions that operate to produce migrant/nonmigrant fertility differentials, address some of the theoretical aspects of the decision of whether or not to intervene in population redistribution patterns, discuss possible dimensions of the study of migration impacts, and examine various conventional methods of subnational population projections and suggests an innovative technique that will increase understanding of the dynamic process of multiregional population growth and distribution.
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