Your search found 51 Results

  1. 1
    328893
    Peer Reviewed

    Achieving the millennium development goals for health and nutrition in Bangladesh: key issues and interventions--an introduction.

    Sack DA

    Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition. 2008 Sep; 26(3):253-60.

    Among the mega-countries, Bangladesh stands out in terms of the density of population. As opposed to other countries with a population exceeding 100 million, the density of population in Bangladesh is more than twice the density of other populous countries, and the population continues to grow. Bangladesh is only half way up the population curve such that, during the next 50 years, the difference in density between Bangladesh and other countries will widen even further. Thus, the density of population, as well as poverty, and the rapid urbanization of the country are major constraints for Bangladesh while it attempts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Hopefully, the fertility rate will continue to fall to levels less than needed for replacement, since this will ease one of these constraints. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    094046

    Sri Lanka, South Asia Region.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Public Affairs Department

    IPPF COUNTRY PROFILES. 1994 Jan; 25-30.

    The government of Sri Lanka has made progress in its population program, but it remains concerned that Sri Lanka continues to be one of the world's most densely populated countries. Population growth has an adverse effect upon efforts to improve the quality of life and alleviate poverty. The government, therefore, in 1991 implemented a population policy designed to limit population growth to a level feasible given available resources. The policy also calls for replacement level fertility by the year 2000. Emphasizing motivation and contraceptive distribution, Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka (FPASL) projects support and complement the government's family planning program. Specifically, FPASL operates two clinics and provides educational programs on sexual health and population issues, contraceptive social marketing, sterilization programs, and the rural IEM project Praja Shanthi. FPASL total funding in 1992 was $828,560. 1987 Demographic and Health Survey data indicate that 62% of married women practice contraception. 40% use modern methods, with female sterilization being the most popular at 24.8%, followed by male sterilization (4.9%), and the pill (4.1%). Only 1.9% use condoms. Rhythm is the most popular traditional method with 15% of users. Abortion is legal only to save a women's life. Trained nurses, midwives, and chemists are allowed to distribute oral contraceptives, and both male and female sterilization are permitted without restriction. The paper also reports demographic statistical data and information on social and health aspects of the country.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    045843

    WHO Expert Committee on Filariasis. Third report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expert Committee on Filariasis

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1974; (542):1-54.

    A World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Filariasis met in Athens in October 1973 to consider developments that have taken place since the last such meeting in 1967. At least 250 million people throughout the world are estimated to be infected with Wuchereria bancrofti and Brugia malayi. Mass treatment with diethylcarbamazine, vector control, malaria control, and socioeconomic development have contributed to a decline in a filarial infection in some parts of the world; however there is evidence to suggest that filariasis has increased in both prevalence and distribution range in many parts of Africa and Asia. The total population at risk has doubled in the past 20 years. Factors that are likely to contribute to the spread and intensity of infection include uncontrolled urbanization, increasing population density and movements of people to and from endemic sites, and a lack of adequate waste water drainage. The success of filariasis control programs depends largely on well-planned health education compaigns based on the local cultural attitudes and behavior patterns. Such campaigns should provide an understanding of the mode of transmission and development of the disease, a knowledge of the parasite and local vectors, and methods of prevention and treatment. Also needed are epidemiologic assessments to obtain baseline data on the prevalence and distribution of filariasis, to define the public health importance of filariasis in an area, and to monitor and evaluate changes in endemicity including those due to control programs.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    273090

    Social studies and population education. Book Three: man in his environment.

    University of Sierra Leone. Institute of Education

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, Ministry of Education, 1984. 93 p. (UNFPA/UNESCO Project SIL/76/POI)

    The National Programme in Social Studies in Sierra Leone has created this textbook in the social sciences, with an emphasis on population education, for 2ndary school students. Unit 1, "Man's Origin, Development and Characteristics," describes Darwin's theory of evolution and explains how overproduction causes problems of rapid population growth and poor quality of life. Special attention is given to the problem of high infant mortality in Sierra Leone. Unit 2, "Man's Environment," discusses the interrelationships and interdependence among elements in the ecosystem, the food pyramid, and the effects of man's activities and numbers on the ecosystem. Unit 3, "Man's Culture," focuses on the processes of socialization and the different agents of socialization: the family, the group, the school, and the community. Unit 4, "Population and Resources," discusses human and natural resources as well as conservation measures. It also discusses the population composition, its effect on resources, and the uses and significance of population data. Unit 5, "Communication in the Service of Man," covers land, water and air transport; the effects of transport developments in Sierra Leone; and implications for population of changes in transport activities. Unit 6, "Global Issues: Achievements and Problems," deals with the young population, characteristics of the adolescent, common social problems among young people, and the role of the family unit. National and international action is also discussed.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    273089

    Social studies and population education. Book Two: man in his environment.

    University of Sierra Leone. Institute of Education

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, Ministry of Education, 1984. 80 p. (UNFPA/UNESCO Project SIL/76/POI)

    The National Programme in Social Studies in Sierra Leone has created this textbook in the social sciences for secondary school students. Unit 1, "Man's Origins, Development and Characteristics," presents the findings of archaeologists and anthropologists about the different periods of man's development. Man's mental development and population growth are also considered. Unit 2, "Man's Environment," discusses the physical and social environments of Sierra Leone, putting emphasis on the history of migrations into Sierra Leone and the effects of migration on population growth. Unit 3, "Man's Culture," deals with cultural traits related to marriage and family structure, different religions of the world, and traditional beliefs and population issues. Unit 4, "Population and Resources," covers population distribution and density and the effects of migration on resources. The unit also discusses land as a resource and the effects of the land tenure system, as well as farming systems, family size and the role of women in farming communities. Unit 5, "Communication in the Service of Man", focuses on modern means of communication, especially mass media. Unit 6, "Global Issues: Achievements and Problems," discusses the identification of global issues, such as colonialism, the refugee problem, urbanization, and the population problems of towns and cities. The unit describes 4 organizations that have been formed in response to problems such as these: the UN, the Red Cross, the International Labor Organization, and the Co-operative for American Relief.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    091149

    Recent population trends and future prospects: report of the Secretary-General.

    United Nations. Dept. of Economic and Social Affairs

    In: The Population Debate: Dimensions and Perspectives, Vol. I. N.Y., U.N., 1975, pp. 3-44. (Population Studies, No. 57)

    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    101728

    [Statement of Benin] Intervention.

    Tagnon R

    [Unpublished] 1994. Presented at the International Conference on Population and Development [ICPD], Cairo, Egypt, September 5-13, 1994. [10] p.

    The Minister of Planning and Economic Restructuring led the delegation from Benin and addressed the International Conference on Population and Development. The real African problem, which deserves much attention (i.e., deep analyses and courageous and well considered solutions) is chaotic urbanization. It is abrupt and rarely accompanied by an urbanization program and planning. Illness, absence of hygiene, lack of social protection, no potable water, and no electricity concentrate in and around the urban perimeter or in several megalopoles which empty and drain rural areas. African cities are swelling without end and are incapable of producing the corresponding riches of this population growth. Cotonou has more than 10% of Benin's population. Restoration of democracy, promotion of nongovernmental organizations, growth of women's groups, and rehabilitation of a responsible civil society constitute a firm determinant for a national debate on population. Different levels of society at the local level have gathered to debate principal population questions over several days of reflection on population. The challenge of demographic growth and sustainable development is much more a question of poverty and ignorance than of population size. Solutions that Benin is striving for include: improvement of rural productivity and diversification of agricultural production, opening up of production zones to favor free movement of agricultural products in the interior of the national territory, promotion of the family, strengthening of population education programs, family life and sex education for school age children and adolescents, and research for a better training-work equivalency with emphasis on better promotion of self-employment. Development of family planning cannot occur without substantial improvement in the population's education level, especially that of women. Benin's objective is to get women to understand that it is better to use contraceptives to avoid unwanted pregnancies than to find means to eliminate them. Benin subscribes to primary health care.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    104206

    World population 1994. [Wallchart].

    United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. Population Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, Dept. for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis, Population Division, 1994 Aug. [2] p. (ST/ESA/SER.A/142)

    This wall chart tabulates data from the medium variant of the UN population estimates and projections as revised in 1994. Figures are given for the world as a whole and for more developed, less developed, and least developed areas. Data are also provided for regions and for individual countries within those regions. The mid-year population is shown in thousands for 1994, 2015, and 2050. Figures are then detailed for percentage annual growth rate, crude birth rate, crude death rate, total fertility rate, life expectancy at birth, and infant mortality rate for 1990-95. Age distribution (under age 15 years and 65 years or older) and density data are also provided for mid-1994. In addition to the main table, a listing is given of the 10 largest countries in 1994, and bar graphs show world population in millions for 1950-2050 as well as the average annual increase in millions for 1950-2050.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    097922

    Population conference isn't about abortion [letter]

    Taapopi N; de Jong A

    NEW YORK TIMES. 1994 Aug 24; A16.

    This is a letter from two neighbors at the UN with a strong interest in population issues. Namibia is very sparsely populated and has limited arable land. Nevertheless the population doubles every 25 years. This is a threat to Namibia's environment and its possibilities for economic development. The Netherlands is one of the most densely populated countries in the world, with an average of 400 inhabitants on every square kilometer, which causes problems of congestion and pollution, and creates strong competition for space. Thus, the International Conference on Population and Development, to take place in Cairo next month, is important to both our countries. This is not a conference between the Vatican and the US Administration. This is not a conference about abortion and homosexuality either. The conference in Cairo is about the delicate equilibrium between humanity and its environment. It deals with the sustainability of life on earth and the relationship between the number of people and the possibility for our children to develop a meaningful life. (full text)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    080660

    Metropolitan areas and disaster vulnerability: a consideration for developing countries.

    Anderson MB

    In: Environmental management and urban vulnerability, edited by Alcira Kreimer, Mohan Munasinghe. Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1992. 77-92. (World Bank Discussion Papers 168)

    The relationships between disaster vulnerability and metropolitan life are analyzed, to learn to what extent urban conditions increase risks of both natural and human-caused disasters in developing countries. The characteristics which contribute to disaster vulnerability are 1) those which result from the concentrations of people and activities in limited space; 2) those which result from the sheer numbers of people and activities; and 3) those which result from proximity to human-made hazards. Limited space increases vulnerability because of 1) crowdedness and disease; 2) crowdedness and buildings; and 3) crowdedness and the resource base. The probaBIlity of disease transmission is raised when conditions are unsanitary, and metropolitan areas are particularly vulnerable to epidemic disease. The concentration of people and enterprises in metropolitan areas deplete the capacities of the basic resources and to absorb wastes. The proximity of human-made systems with the potential for becoming hazards also increases urban vulnerability. In 1980 about one billion people lived in cities in the developing world, and by the year 2000 the number will rise to 1.9 billion. In Africa, the urban population will more than double between 1980 and 2000. By 2000, 20 cities in the world will have populations greater than 10 million people, and 17 of these will be in developing nations. Mexico City is the largest city in the world with 17 million people, and it will have 25 million people in 2000. Again, by the year 2000, it is estimated that more than half of the households of developing countries that live at subsistence levels will live in urban centers. In Delhi half of the population lives in slums and this figure will reach 85% by 2000. The immediate costs of disasters in metropolitan areas can be very high in terms of both loss of life and the value of damaged property. Secondary costs of urban disasters can also be high because they damage infrastructure and places of employment, production, and commerce.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    075500

    Population crisis and desertification in the Sudano-Sahelian region.

    Milas S

    ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION. 1984 Summer; 11(2):167-9.

    People living in the area just south of the Sahara Desert in Africa face their 3rd major drought since 1900. This drought brings about famine. Drought and famine are only manifestations of more profound problems: soil erosion and degradation. They diminish land productivity which aggravates the population's poverty. Yet soil erosion and degradation occur due to an expanding population. Continued pressures on the land and soil degradation results in desertification. The UN Environment Programme's Assessment of the Status and Trend of Desertification shows that between 1978-84 desertification spread. Expanding deserts now endanger 35% of the world's land and 20% of the population. In the thorn bush savanna zone, most people are subsistence farmers or herdsmen and rely on the soils, forests, and rangelands. Even though the mean population density in the Sahel is low, it is overpopulated since people concentrate in areas where water is available. These areas tend to be cities where near or total deforestation has already occurred. Between 1959-84, the population in the Sahel doubled so farmers have extended cultivation into marginal areas which are vulnerable to desertification. The livestock populations have also grown tremendously resulting in overgrazing and deforestation. People must cook their food which involves cutting down trees for fuelwood. Mismanagement of the land is the key cause for desertification, but the growing poor populations have no choice but to eke out an existence on increasingly marginal lands. Long fallow periods would allow the land to regain its fertility, but with the ever-increasing population this is almost impossible. Humans caused desertification. We can improve land use and farming methods to stop it.
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    076548

    1991 ESCAP population data sheet.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population Division

    Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP, Population Division, 1991. [1] p.

    The 1991 Population Data Sheet produced by the UN Economic and social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) provides a large chart by country and region for Asia and the Pacific for the following variables: mid-1991 population, average annual growth rate, crude birth rate, crude death rate, total fertility rate, infant mortality rate, male life expectancy at birth, female life expectancy at birth, % aged 0-14 years, % aged 65 and over, dependency ratios, density, % urban, and population projection at 2010. 3 charts also display urban and rural population trends between 1980 and 2025, the crude birth and death rates and rate of natural increase by region, and dependency ratios for 27 countries.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    071380

    Mission finds Egypt poised for "demographic breakthrough".

    POPULATION. 1992 Feb; 18(2):3.

    In 1991, an UNFPA Programme Review and Strategy Development mission went to Egypt and noted that the government's population and development goals for 1988-92 had been realized. Between 1988-91, the contraceptive prevalence rate rose from 37.6 to 47.6% and infant mortality fell from 54 to 50. Data indicated that maternal mortality was also declining. The crude birth rate fell from 39.8 to 32.2 (1985-90) which slowed growth from 2.8 to 2.5%. Yet this progress may not prevent an environmental disaster or improve individual standards of living. In fact, the Minister for the Economy noted in December 1991 that population growth was the only obstacle to economic success in Egypt. The mission recommended that any large amounts of population and development. The population grew >3-fold in 50 years bringing its population to almost 56 million. Demographers have predicted the population will reach 70 million in 2000. As os 1991, 96% of the population lived on 4% of the land which borders the River Nile. Family planning (FP) programs have traditionally been centrally organized, but the mission noted that decentralized programs are needed. It further stated that local FP efforts should form a bridge between public and private FP providers. The report also stressed that UNFPA should focus its effect in Upper Egypt where population growth is the fastest. It also recommended that UNFPA take a more comprehensive view of women, population, and development issues, especially since the burden of contraception falls on women. This suggestion included a wider range of contraceptives and more female physicians. FP providers should target younger women since most contraceptive users have already reached their desired family size. Finally, the mission advocated local contraceptive production and more involvement of the private sector.
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    048000

    State of world population 1987.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    In: UNFPA: 1986 report, [by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1987. 6-31.

    The implications of population growth and prospects for the future are examined in a 1987 UNFPA report on the state of world population. Demographic patterns in developed and developing countries are compared, as well as life expectancy and mortality rates. Although most countries have passed the stage of maximum growth, Africa's growth rate continues to increase. Changes in world population size are accompanied by population distribution and agricultural productivity changes. On an individual level, the fate of Baby 5 Billion is examined based on population trajectories for a developing country (Kenya, country A), and a developed country of approximately the same size (Korea, country B). The report outlines the hazards that Baby 5 Billion would face in a developing country and explains the better opportunities available in country B. Baby 5 Billion is followed through adolescence and adulthood. Whether the attainment of 5 billion in population is a threat or a triumph is questioned. Several arguments propounding the beneficial social, economic, and environmental effects of unchecked population growth are refuted. In addition, evidence of the serious consequences of deforestation and species extinction is presented. The report concludes with an explanation of the developmental, health and economic benefits of vigorous population control policies, especially in developing countries.
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    047665

    The water crisis and population. [Pamphlet collection].

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]

    [Rome, Italy], FAO, [1986]. vi, [126] p.

    The dimensions of the water crisis and its implications for the population of the world is the subject of a 4-pamphlet packet distributed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Part 1 relates legends about water and details the role of water in human history. Rapid population growth and its detrimental effects on water conservation and the environmental balance are explained. Recognition of the population growth problem is urged, with government-backed family planning programs recommended. Part 2 gives a detailed explanation of the life cycle and its dependence on soil and water. Climate, vegetation, and types of water are examined in relation to their role in the distribution of available water resources. Future water resources and demand are projected for agriculture, industry, and domestic use. The disruption of the balance between man and water and the problem of water pollution are addressed, as are deforestation, desertification, drought, and the greenhouse effect. Part 3 offers a view of inland waters and agriculture, with a history of irrigation and the role of irrigation today. Rural water, its use, sources, storage, and collection are examined in relation to work distribution, family size, and sanitation. Problems arising from unsafe water supplies, including disease, infection, and malnutrition are discussed, and examples are given of small-scale projects that have successfully addressed these problems. The final section deals with water and the future. A continuing effort at water and land conservation, as well as surface water and ground water management, is urged. Irrigation planning and supporting systems, such as terracing, fallowing, and improved cropping patterns, are presented as further management techniques. Preserving existing resources, lifting, various kinds of wells, new storage methods and purification systems, are suggested to increase domestic water conservation. Examples of water projects in Africa, Asia, and the South Pacific are presented. Finally, population management and its crucial role in future water resources allocation, conservation, and distribution, is provided.
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    196123

    1987 ESCAP population data sheet.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population Division

    Bangkok, Thailand, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Population Division, 1988. 1 p.

    This sheet gives the 1987 demographic estimates for Asian and Pacific countries and areas. Countries and areas are grouped under ESCAP, East Asia, South-East Asia, South Asia and the Pacific. Estimates are offered for mid-1987 population, average annual growth rate, crude birth rate, crude death rate, total fertility rate, male and female life expectancy at birth, infant mortality rate, % aged 0-14, % aged 65+, density, and population projected to 2010. Also included are 2 charts depicting the estimated and projected population of the ESCAP region by broad age group for 1960, 1985, and 2010, and the estimated and projected total fertility rate of ESCAP subregions, 1960 to 2010. Some estimates for the ESCAP region include a mid-1987 population of 2,805,056,000; a 1.82% average annual growth rate; a 27.5 crude birth rate; a 9.3 crude death rate; a fertility rate of 3.3; male and female life expectancies of 61.8 and 64.1, respectively; an infant mortality rate of 72; 89 persons/square kilometer; 33.5% of the population aged 0-14, 4.8% of the population aged 65+; and a population projected to reach 3,866,375,000 by 2010.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    050308

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1985/86.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, 1987. xi, 826 p. (Population Programmes and Projects, Volume 2.)

    This inventory of population projects in developing countries shows, at a glance, by country, internationally assisted projects funded, inaugurated, or being carried out by multilateral, bilateral, and other agencies and organizations during the reporting period (January 1985 to June 1986). Demographic estimates such as population by sex and by age group, age indicators, urban-rural population, and population density refer to the year end 1985; other estimates such as average annual change, rate of annual change, fertility, and mortality are 5-year averages for 1985-1990. The dollar value of projects or total country programs is given where figures are available. Chapter I provides information on country programs, and Chapter II deals with regional, interregional, and global programs. Chapter III lists sources, including published sources of information and and addresses for additional information and for keeping up-to-date on population activities. Each country profile includes a statement by Head of State of Government on their government's views regarding population, and views of the government on other population matters.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    196108

    1986 ESCAP population data sheet.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population Division

    Bangkok, Thailand, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Population Division, 1985. 1 p.

    The 1986 Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) population data sheet gives statistics on the mid-1986 population, the annual growth rate, the crude birth and death rates, the total fertility rate, male and female expectancy at birth, the infant mortality rate, the percentage of the population aged 0-14 and 65 and over, population density, and the projected population in 2000 for the Asian and Pacific regions, and individual Asian and Pacific countries. Sources are cited for all statistics.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    037147

    [Recommendations of the Population World Plan of Action and of the United Nations Expert Group on Population Distribution, Migration and Development] Recomendaciones del Plan de Accion Mundial sobre Poblacion y del Grupo de Expertos de la Organizacion de las Naciones Unidas sobre Distribucion de la Poblacion, Migracion y Desarrollo.

    De Oliveira O

    In: Reunion Nacional sobre Distribucion de la Poblacion, Migracion y Desarrollo, Guadalajara, Jalisco, 11 de mayo de 1984, [compiled by] Mexico. Consejo Nacional de Poblacion [CONAPO]. Mexico City, Mexico, CONAPO, 1984. 21-31.

    Highlights are presented of the expert meeting on population distribution, migration, and development held in Hammamet, Tunisia, in March 1983 to prepare for the 1984 World Population Conference. Rafael Salas, Secretary General of the World Population Conference, indicated in the inaugural address of the meeting that changes in the past 10 years including the increasing importance of short-term movements, illegal migrations, and refugees would require international agreements for their resolution. In the area of internal migrations, Salas suggested that in addition to migration to metropolitan areas which continues to predominate, short-term movements of various kinds need to be considered in policy. Improvement in the quality of life of the urban poor is an urgent need. Leon Tabah, Adjunct Secretary General of the World Population Conference, pointed out that population distribution and migration had received insufficient attention in the 1975 World Population Conference, and that the World Population Plan of Action should be modified accordingly. Among the most important findings of the meeting were: 1) The Plan of Action overstressed the negative effects of urbanization and rural migration. Available evidence suggests that migration and urbanization are effects rather than causes of a larger process of unequal regional and sectorial development 2) The historical context of each country should be considered in research and planning regarding population movements. 3) Analyses of the determinants and consequences of migration were reexamined in light of their relationship to the processes of employment, capital accumulation, land tenure, technological change, ethnic and educational aspects, and family dynamics. 4) The need to consider interrelationships between urban rural areas in formulation of policy affecting population distribution was emphasized. 5) National development strategies and macroeconomic and sectoral policies usually have stronger spatial effects than measures specifically designed to influence population distribution, and should be examined to ensure compatability of goals. 6) Population distribution policies should not be viewed as ends in themselves but as measures to achieve larger goals such as reducing socioeconomic inequalities. 7) Multiple levels of analysis should be utilized for understanding the causes and consequences of population movements. 8) Programs of assistance should be organized for migrants and their families. 9) The human and labor rights of migrants and nonmigrants should be considered in policy formulation. 10) Policies designed to improve living and working conditions of women are urgently needed.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    196098

    1985 ESCAP population data sheet.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population Division

    Bangkok, Thailand, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Population Division, 1985. 2 p.

    The 1985 Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) population data sheet gives statistics on the mid-1985 population, the annual growth rate, the crude birth and death rates, the total fertility rate, male and female expectancy at birth, the infant mortality rate, the percentage of the population aged 0-14 and 65 and over, population density, and the projected population in 2000 for the Asian and Pacific regions, and individual Asian and Pacific countries. Sources are cited for all statistics.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    129833

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1984/85.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities, 1986. x, 787 p. (Population Programmes and Projects, Volume 1.)

    This inventory of population projects in developing countries shows, at a glance, by country, internationally assisted projects funded, inaugurated, or being carried out by multilateral, bilateral, and other agencies and organizations during the reporting period (January 1984 to June 1985). Demographic estimates such as population by sex and by age group, age indicators, urban-rural population, and population density refer to 1985; other estimates such as average annual change, rate of annual change, fertility, and mortality are 5-year averages for 1980-1985. The dollar value of projects or total country programs is given where figures are available. Chapter I provides information on country programs, and Chapter II deals with regional, interregional and global programs. Chapter III lists sources, including published sources of information and addresses for additional information and for keeping up-to-date on population activities. Each country profile includes a statement by Head of State or Head of Government on thier government's views regarding population, and views of the government on other population matters.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    249759

    Supercities: problems of urban growth.

    Leepson M

    Editorial Research Reports. 1985; 2(20):887-904.

    The author discusses aspects of urbanization, living conditions in urban centers, and selected policies, summarizing findings from recently published sources. U.N. population projections for selected urban areas for the year 2000 are compared with 1950 estimates, and the proportions of the population living in urban areas in various regions of the world are contrasted. Attention is given to living conditions in rapidly growing and crowded cities, including Mexico City, Mexico; Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; and Cairo, Egypt. Statements on urban growth issued by the U.N. Fund for Population Activities are considered.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    032288

    Prospects of population growth and changes in sex-age structures in Asian countries.

    Otomo A; Obayashi S

    In: Population prospects in developing countries: structure and dynamics, edited by Atsushi Otomo, Haruo Sagaza, and Yasuko Hayase. Tokyo, Japan, Institute of Developing Economies, 1985. 1-15, 325. (I.D.E. Statistical Data Series No. 46)

    This discussion covers the prospects of population growth in Asian countries, prospects of changes in sex-age structures in Asian countries, and the effect of urbanization on national population growth in developing countries. According to the UN estimates assessed in 1980, size of total population of Asian countries recorded 2580 million in 1980, which accounted for 58.2% of total population of the world. As it had shown 1390 million, accounting for 55.1% of the world population in 1950, it grew at a higher annual increase rate of 2.08% than that of 1.90% for the world average during the 30 years. On the basis of the UN population projections assessed in 1980 (medium variant), the world population attains 6121 million by 2000, and Asian population records 3555 million, which is 58.0% of the total population of the world and which is a slightly smaller share than in 1980. The population of East Asia shows 1475 million and that of South Asia 2077 million. During 20 years after 1980, the population growth becomes much faster in South Asia than in East Asia. After 1980 the population growth rate in Asia as well as on the world average shows a declining trend. In Asia it indicates 1.72% for 1980-90 and 1.50% for 1990-2000, whereas on the world average it shows 1.76% and 1.49%, respectively. The population density for Asia showing 94 persons per square kilometer, slightly lower than that of Europe (99 persons) as of 1980, records 129 persons per square kilometer and exceeds that of Europe (105 persons) in 2000. According to the UN estimates assessed in 1980, the sex ratio for the world average indicates 100.7 males/100 females as of 1980, and it shows 104.1 for Asia. This is higher than that for the average of developing countries (103.2). In the year 2000 it is observed generally in the UN projections that the countries with a sex ratio of 100 and over as of 1980 show a decrease but those with the ratio smaller than 100 record an increase. Almost all Asian countries are projected to indicate a decrease in the proportion of population aged 0-14 against the increases in that aged 15-64 and in that aged 65 and older between 1980-2000. In 1980 the proportion of population aged 0-14 showed more than 40.0% in most of the Asian countries. In the year 2000 almost all the countries in East Asia and Eastern South Asia indicate larger than 60.0% in the proportion of adult population. Urbanization brings about the effects of reducing the speed of increase in a national population and of causing significant changes in sex and age structures of the national population. Considering the future acceleration of urbanization in Asian countries, the prospects of growth and changes in sex and age structures of populations in Asian countries may need to be revised from the standpoint of subnational population changes.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    016931

    Population in the Arab world: problems and prospects.

    Omran AR

    New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities; London, England, Croom Helm, 1980. 215 p.

    The Arab population, consisting of 20 states and the people of Palestine, was almost 153 million in 1978 and is expected to reach 300 million by the year 2000. Most Arab countries have a high population growth rate of 3%, a young population structure with about 50% under age 15, a high rate of marriage, early age of marriage, large family size norm, and an agrarian rural community life, along with a high rate of urban expansion. Health patterns are also similar with epidemic diseases leading as causes of mortality and morbidity. But there is uneven distribution of wealth in the region with per capita annual income ranging from US$100 in Somalia to US$12,050 in Kuwait; health care is also more elaborate in the wealthier countries. Fertility rates are high in most countries, with crude birthrates about 45/1000 compared with 32/1000 in the world as a whole and 17/1000 in most developed countries. In many Arab countries up to 30-50% of total investment is involved in population-related activities compared to 15% in European countries. There is also increasing pressure in the educational and health systems with the same amount of professionals dealing with an increasing amount of people. Unplanned and excessive fertility also contributes to health problems for mothers and children with higher morbidity, mortality, and nutrition problems. Physical isolation of communities contributes to difficulties in spreading health care availability. Urban population is growing rapidly, 6%/year in most Arab cities, and at a rate of 10-15% in the cities of Kuwait and Qatar; this rate is not accompanied by sufficient urban planning policies or modernization. A unique population problem in this area is that of the over 2 million Palestinians living in and outside the Middle East who put demographic pressures on the Arab countries. 2 major constraints inhibit efforts to solve the Arab population problem: 1) the difficulty of actually reallocating the people to achieve more even distribution, and 2) cultural and political sensitivities. Since in the Arab countries fertility does not correlate well with social and economic indicators, it is possible that development alone will not reduce the fertility of the Arab countries unless rigorous and effective family planning policies are put into action.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    762112

    Senegal.

    Menes RJ

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Office of International Health, Division of Planning and Evaluation, 1976. 144 p. (Syncrisis: the dynamics of health, XIX)

    This report uses available statistics to examine health conditions in Senegal and their interaction with socioeconomic development. Background data are presented, after which population, health status, nutrition, environmental health, health infrastructure, facilities, services and manpower, national health policy and planning, international organizations, and the Sahel are discussed. Diseases such as malaria, measles, tuberculosis, trachoma and venereal diseases are endemic in Senegal, and high levels of infant and childhood mortality exist throughout the country but especially in rural areas. Diarrhea, respiratory infections, and neonatal tetanus contribute to this mortality and are evidence of the poor health environment, and lack of basic services including nutrition assistance, health education, and potable water. Nutrition in Senegal appears to be good in general, but seasonal and local variations sometimes produce malnutrition. Lowered fertility rates would reduce infant and maternal mortality and morbidity and might slow the present decline in per capita food intake. At present the government of Senegal has no population policy and almost no provisions for family planning services. Health services are inadequate and inefficient, with shortages of all levels of health manpower, poor planning, and overemphasis on curative services.
    Add to my documents.

Pages