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  1. 1
    003645

    Program report [of the Central America regional seminar-workshop entitled] New Focuses of Family Planning Program Administration: Analysis of Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys and Other Program Data, [held in] Antigua, Guatemala, May 25-30, 1980.

    Centre for Population Activities [CEFPA]

    [Washington, D.C., CEFPA, 1980.] 30 p. (Contract AID/pha-c-1187)

    This report 1) presents a summary of the planning process of the seminar-workshop in family planning held in Antigua, Guatemala from May 25-30, 1980; 2) reviews program content and training methodology; and 3) provides feedback on the evaluation of the program and in-country follow-up responses to the workshop. Negotiations were made between the Centre for Population Activities (CEFPA) officials, USAID (U.S. Agency for International Development) population/health officials, and family planning officials from each participating country to elicit program suggestions and support. The ensuing communication process facilitated the development of the program in many ways, including: 1) program design, which incorporated in-country family planning program needs, suggested workshop topics, and country-specific requests for workshop objective; 2) participant selection; and 3) USAID mission commitment. The workshop aimed to provide an opportunity for leaders of family planning and related programs to make an intelligent and effective use of data available to them. The training methodology consisted of structured small-group exercises. Program content included: 1) contraceptive prevalence survey case exercise, which aims to identify problem areas and need in the delivery of family planning and maternal child health services as a tool in assessing progress towards family planning goals; 2) other data sources available to family planning program managers, including World Fertility Survey data and program service statistics; 3) program alternatives in the form of mini-workshops on such topics as logistics management, improving clinic efficiency, primary health and family planning, adolescent fertility, and voluntary sterilization; and 4) program planning, which enables participants to interpret data and apply them in the planning process. In evaluating the workshop, a majority of the participants reported that the workshop and their own personal objectives were either completely or almost completely achieved, and they also indicated that more workshops at the regional and national levels should be conducted.
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  2. 2
    103426

    Re-tooling in applied social investigation for development planning: some methodological issues.

    Cernea MM

    In: RAP: Rapid Assessment Procedures. Qualitative methodologies for planning and evaluation of health related programmes, edited by Nevin S. Scrimshaw and Gary R. Gleason. Boston, Massachusetts, International Nutrition Foundation for Developing Countries, 1992. 11-23.

    Rapid assessment procedures (RAP) grew explosively in the 1980s in the social investigation of development work, with four main trends to be distinguished: 1) fast repertoire enrichment with new and imaginative procedures; 2) application of RAP in new sectors through content-adaptation and cross-fertilization (rapid rural appraisal by Chambers); 3) geographic broadening in both elaboration and application of RAP (from Sussex, England, to Thailand, Kenya, and India); and 4) the growing shift from technique to substance. There has been compelling demonstration of RAP's potential for changing and improving the planning of development. RAP can increase the planners' ability to put people first in the development projects. Furthermore, a decade of RAP work has launched some social sciences on a path of methodological retooling. Some major development agencies (the World Bank, USAID, ODA) have started to use RAP. The World Bank has been striving to promote the use of sociological/anthropological investigation methods for generating social information needed in projects. The RAP field work of a medical anthropologist who had received a 2-year contract from USAID to conduct research in Swaziland within a water-borne disease project illustrates the value of RAP. He questioned the lengthy sample survey and carried out an informal study of the health beliefs and behavior among traditional healers and rural health motivators. Within 6 months he collected sociocultural information and specific health-related data which led to significant improvement in the public health network via cooperation between traditional and modern health practitioners. The epistemological risks of RAPs result from the limitations intrinsic to the procedures themselves: accuracy, representativeness, cultural appropriateness, and subjectivity. The extrinsic risks are an improper contextual place or weight within the research strategy. These limitations can be overcome by professional training of RAP practitioners. Nevertheless, RAPs are not a universal cure for gaps in social information, and long-term social research is still essential.
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  3. 3
    025933

    Food and agricultural development.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Bureau for Program and Policy Coordination

    Washington, D.C., Agency for International Development, 1982 May. 8 p. (A.I.D. Policy Paper)

    The Task Force of the US Agency for International Development (US AID) sets forth the overall objectives, policy decisions, and programming implications for food and agricultural assistance funded from Development Assistance, Economic Support Fund, and PL 480 budgets. The objective of US food and agricultural assistance is to enable developing countries to become self-reliant in food through increased agricultural production and greater economic efficiency in marketing and distribution of food products. Improved food consumption is gained through expanded employment to increase purchasing power, increased awareness of sound nutritional principles, and direct distribution of food from domestic or external sources to those facing severe malnutrition and food shortages. Policy elements to accomplish these objectives include 1) improving country policies to remove constraints on food production; 2) developing human resources and institutional capabilities, including research on food and agriculture problems; 3) expanding the role of private sectors in developing countries and private sector in agricultural development; and 4) employing available assistance instruments and technologies in an integrated and efficient manner. A sound country policy framework is fundamental for agricultural growth and should 1) rely on free markets, product incentives, and equitable access to resources; 2) give priority to complementary public sector investments that complement and encourage rather than compete with private sector growth. Private and voluntary organizations (PVOs) can also offer low-cost approaches to agricultural development that take local attitudes and conditions into account. Under appropriate conditions, US AID will finance a share of recurrent costs of food and agricultural research, education, extension or related institutions, provided that policy and institution frameworks assure effective utilization and the country is making maximum and/or increasing domestic resource mobilization efforts.
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