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  1. 1
    055030

    Jamaica.

    Seaga EP

    In: Population perspectives. Statements by world leaders. Second edition, [compiled by] United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. New York, New York, UNFPA, 1985. 89.

    Rapid population growth has impeded the efforts of the Government of Jamaica to provide adequate social services such as education and health care to all sectors of the population. Moreover, the population-related problems of high unemployment, widespread rural-urban migration, and an unequal distribution of income have hindered the country's development process. Jamaica's National Population Policy, adopted in 1983, seeks to establish a coherent set of goals in terms of achieving a population size that is consistent with sustained economic development. Targets of this policy include a population not exceeding 3 million by the year 2000; attainment of an average total fertility rate of 2 births/woman by the end of the 1980s; an increase in life expectancy from the current level of 70 years to 73 years by 2000; a reduction in the outmigration of skilled labor through increased employment opportunities; and improvements in the areas of housing, nutrition, education, and environmental conditions. Although fertility remains unacceptably high, the crude birth rate has declined in the post-Independence period, from 40/1000 in 1960 to 27/1000 in 1980. Crucial to the attainment of these goals is the involvement of all areas of government and the private sector.
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  2. 2
    267162

    National growth, national strength, statement made at the Second African Population Conference, Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, 8 January, 1984.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1984]. 8 p. (Speech Series No. 105)

    The upsurge of population growth in Africa comes at a time when world growth rates, and the rates for all other regions of the world, have begun to decline. But growth itself is only one aspect of concern with population. Another and most important issue is the severe imbalance between resources and population which now exists in many African countries as the result of low levels of development and lagging utilization of natural resources, particularly for food production. Population growth is accompanied by explosive urban growth in amny centers, while international migration is also increasing, partly voluntary, partly under political or economic pressure. A new emphasis on population questions in Africa invites consideration of new policy directions and reassessment of some old ones. It will be convenient to deal with these under the 4 subjects which will form the basis for the agenda at this year's International Conference on Population to be held in Mexico City in August, 1984. These are mortality and health; fertility and the family; population distribution and migration and population; and resources, environment and development. Each of these topics are considered with particular reference to the African experience.
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  3. 3
    267109

    UNFPA operations--report to the general assembly, statement made at the 33rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, New York, 6 Nov 1978.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1978]. 13 p.

    In his report to the United Nations General Assembly concerning UNFPA operations, Mr. R. Salas cites the growth of UNFPA from a small US$3 million trust fund with 12 projects of limited scope, to a Fund of the General Assembly with cumulative resources of over US$500 million supporting over 1900 projects in 114 countries throughout the world. The Fund has been a pioneer within the U.N. development system in supporting programs directly aimed at increasing opportunities for greater women's participation in population and development at all levels--as policy makers, program planners and community workers. Due to the publication of a set of guidelines on women, population and development, requests for assistance in projects directly relating to women have grown. Mr. Salas describes the decline in fertility in various parts of the developing world. Birth rates have also declined in many developing countries, on the average of approximately 15%. Expectation of life at birth has been a feature showing impressive gains. Infant mortality, as well as overall death rates in developing countries, have fallen substantially in the recent past. On the negative side, the imbalance between growing human numbers and accessible resources remains. 85-90% of the 1.5 to 2 billion estimated increase in the world's population before the year 2000 is expected to occur in developing countries. Another population related concern is the growing problem of aging of the population caused by the decline of fertility and the prolongation of life expectancy. The need to integrate population factors in development planning is recognized today by almost all developing countries. In assisting governments which show an increasing desire to make their population policies more comprehensive, UNFPA seeks to encourage in-depth exploration of the interaction between population factors and development.
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