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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    188818
    Peer Reviewed

    Reframing HIV and AIDS.

    Stabinski L; Pelley K; Jacob ST; Long JM; Leaning J

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2003 Nov 8; 327:1101-1103.

    Over the past 20 years, the public health community has learnt a tremendous amount about the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Yet, despite widespread discussion about the epidemic and some measurable progress, the overall response has been insufficient: globally 42 million people are already infected with HIV, prevalence continues to rise, and less than 5% of those affected have access to lifesaving medicines. In the face of this growing crisis, the World Health Organization has made scaling up treatment a key priority of the new administration. We argue that not only is the HIV/AIDS epidemic an emergency, but its devastating effects on societies may qualify it as one of the most serious disasters to have affected humankind. As such, this crisis warrants a full disaster management response. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    180822

    Economic impact of AIDS in developing nations.

    Desmond G; Rockwell R

    AIDS and Society. 1989 Oct; 1(1):5-6.

    Gerald Desmond, Secretary of the United Nations Standing Committee on AIDS, was interviewed in New York by Richard Rockwell, Associate Editor of the Bulletin. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    091153

    Children and AIDS: an impending calamity.

    United Nations Children's Fund [UNICEF]

    New York, New York, United Nations Children's Fund [UNICEF], 1990. 24 p.

    In some parts of Africa, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has infected between 1/5 and 1/4 of otherwise healthy adults of reproductive age. This is a calamity. Those who are fighting AIDS in Africa believe that changes in behavior are the only way to stop the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). WHO estimates that already 6.5 million people are infected; at least 2 million are women. By the year 2000, there will be 6 million AIDS cases. The UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) has been fighting to protect children and women from AIDS since 1987. Looked at here is the predicament of children and women in 3rd world countries. Also, the damage that AIDS is doing to families and communities and the need to contain it are discussed. Most AIDS cases in children are perinatal in origin. Barrier contraception is important in preventing the spread of AIDS. Deliberate family planning (FP) with modern contraceptive methods is unusual in most low-income African communities. Women frequently have less access to medical services than do men. The number of AIDS orphans is already beginning to affect family life. UNICEF estimates that worldwide 30 million children spend most of their time on the streets. They are then ripe for getting AIDS. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are being formed in response to AIDS. The primary health care structure is important for counselling and health education. During 1990 UNICEF plans to spend over US $6 million on special AIDS projects in Africa and almost US $2 million on global projects and projects elsewhere. In many countries UNICEF has helped develop information and education materials. UNICEF wants to reach young people. In Tanzania, workshops have been held to improve the accuracy of data given about AIDS.
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