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  1. 1
    321131

    Towards universal access: scaling up priority HIV / AIDS interventions in the health sector. Progress report, April 2007.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007 Apr. 88 p.

    Drawing on lessons from the scale-up of HIV interventions over the last few years, WHO, as the UNAIDS cosponsor responsible for the health sector response to HIV/AIDS, has established priorities for its technical work and support to countries on the basis of the following five Strategic Directions, each of which represents a critical area where the health sector must invest if significant progress is to be made towards achieving universal access. Enabling people to know their HIV status; Maximizing the health sector's contribution to HIV prevention; Accelerating the scale-up of HIV/AIDS treatment and care; Strengthening and expanding health systems; Investing in strategic information to guide a more effective response. In this context, WHO undertook at the World Health Assembly in May 2006 to monitor and evaluate the global health sector response in scaling up towards universal access and to produce annual reports. This first report addresses progress in scaling up the following health sector interventions. Antiretroviral therapy; Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT); HIV testing and counseling; Interventions for injecting drug users (IDUs); Control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) to prevent HIV transmission; Surveillance of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    302643

    WHO updates medical eligibility criteria for IUCDs.

    Kenya. Ministry of Health; Family Health International [FHI]

    Nairobi, Kenya, Ministry of Health, 2004 Jun. [2] p. (IUCD Method Briefs Update)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recently revised the guidelines for IUCD use as part of an update of its Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (MEC). These revisions will improve quality of care and reduce medical barriers for women who are considering an IUCD as a contraceptive method. Based on the latest clinical and epidemiological research, the revisions are particularly significant for women at risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, and women living with HIV or AIDS. Research has shown that while some conditions restrict IUCD initiation, they do not necessarily affect the safety of continued use. Under the new guidelines, for example, a client who has gonorrhea or chlamydial infection is considered a Category 4 for IUCD initiation and should be advised to choose another method. However, if an IUCD user develops an STI, she can be treated with antibiotics without the IUCD being removed (Category 2). In addition, the client should be counseled about partner notification and treatment, and condom use. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    191655

    Entry points to antiretroviral treatment.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. [2] p. (WHO/HIV/2003.16)

    Scaling up access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) must build on existing clinical or public health services and extend their coverage. It also means making the most of synergies between prevention and care, recognizing that people are more likely to follow prevention advice when they receive comprehensive services. To accomplish this, it will be necessary to exploit opportunities—or entry points—for identifying people who could benefit from treatment. Entry points must provide, or facilitate the link to, HIV testing and counselling, the gateway to treatment services. (excerpt)
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