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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    306659

    Development and testing of the South African National Nutrition Guidelines for People Living with HIV / AIDS.

    Kennedy RD; MacIntyre UE

    SAJCN. South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2003 Feb; 16(1):12-16.

    Malnutrition is a common consequence of HIV infection, and weight loss is used as a diagnostic criterion for HIV/AIDS. The relationship between HIV/AIDS and malnutrition and wasting is well described, with nutritional status compromised by reduced food intake, malabsorption caused by gastrointestinal involvement, increased nutritional needs as a result of fever and infection, and increased nutrient losses. Malnutrition contributes to the frequency and severity of opportunistic infections seen in HIV/AIDS and nutritional status is a major factor in survival. Failure to maintain body cell mass leads to death at 54% of ideal body weight. The effectiveness of nutrition intervention has been documented and dietary nutrition counselling is considered critical in the treatment of HIV/AIDS, especially in view of the fact that drug treatment is inaccessible to many people living with the virus in Africa. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    184996
    Peer Reviewed

    Prophylactic use of cotrimoxazole against opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients: knowledge and practices of health care providers in Cote d'Ivoire.

    Brou H; Desgrees-Du-Lou A; Souville M; Moatti JP; Msellati P

    AIDS Care. 2003 Oct; 15(5):629-637.

    We present here the results of a survey conducted in Côte d’Ivoire, Africa, among health care providers, on the knowledge of prophylactic use of cotrimoxazole to prevent opportunistic infections in HIV-infected persons. The survey was conducted in 15 health centres, involved or not in the ‘initiative of access to treatment for HIV infected people’. Between December 1999 and March 2000, 145 physicians and 297 other health care providers were interviewed. In the analysis, the health centres were divided into three groups: health centres implicated in the initiative of access to treatment for HIV-infected people with a great deal of caring for HIV-infected people, health centres implicated in this initiative but caring for few HIV-infected people, and health centres not specifically involved in the care of HIV-infected people. Six per cent of physicians and 50% of other health care providers had never heard of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. The level of information about this prophylaxis is related to the level of HIV-related activities in the health centre. Among health care providers informed, knowledge on the exact terms of prescription of the cotrimoxazole is poor. In conclusion, it appears that the recommendations for primary cotrimoxazole prophylaxis of HIV-infected people did not reach the whole health care provider population. Most physicians are informed but not other health workers, even if the latter are often the only contact of the patient with the health centre. The only medical staff correctly informed are the physicians already strongly engaged in the care of HIV-infected people. (author's)
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  3. 3
    182569
    Peer Reviewed

    Vitamin A deficiency and increased mortality among human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults in Uganda.

    Langi P; Semba RD; Mugerwa RD; Whalen CC

    Nutrition Research. 2003 May; 23(5):595-605.

    The specific aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency and to examine the relationship between vitamin A deficiency and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. A prospective cohort study was conducted at the outpatient clinic of Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda, among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the placebo arms of a randomized clinical trial to prevent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Of 519 subjects at enrollment, 186 (36%) had serum vitamin A concentrations consistent with deficiency (<1.05 µmol/L). During follow-up (median 17 months), the mortality among subjects with and without vitamin A deficiency at enrollment was 30% and 17%, respectively (P = 0.01). In a multivariate model adjusting for CD4+ lymphocyte count, age, sex, anergy status, body mass index, and diarrhea, vitamin A deficiency was associated with a significantly elevated risk of death [relative risk (RR) = 1.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-2.6]. Vitamin A deficiency is common among HIV-infected adults in this sub-Saharan population and is associated with higher mortality. (author's)
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