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  1. 1
    322011

    Water and sanitation assessment of home-based care clients in Zambia.

    Kangamba M; Roberts C; Campbell J; Service J; Adalla C

    [Baltimore, Maryland], Catholic Relief Services, 2006 Jul. 53 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADJ-423)

    In Zambia, HIV&AIDS is still approached primarily as a health issue, and therefore, interventions focus mainly on prevention and treatment. The provision of affordable, accessible and reliable public services is essential in supporting health maintenance and reducing stress for people infected and affected with HIV&AIDS. Reliable delivery of good quality water and sound basic sanitation are critical in reducing exposure to pathogens to which HIV-positive people are particularly vulnerable. Where water services are inadequate or inaccessible, time and monetary costs of access to good quality water in sufficient quantities are high, particularly for HIV-infected people and their caregivers. CRS responded to an announcement by WHO to conduct an assessment on the adequacy of water, sanitation and hygiene in relation to home-based care strategies for people living with HIV&AIDS in Zambia. The assessment was commissioned by the WHO with the goal of producing evidence-based guidance on water and sanitation needs in home-based care strategies, particularly in resource-poor situations. In addition, WHO desired the assessments to lead to both practical and strategic recommendations to be made at the programme and policy levels, while also identifying the most critical measures to be taken by the health sector and the water and sanitation sector to provide short- and medium-term solutions in the area of water, sanitation and hygiene support to home-based care. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    192050

    Summary booklet of best practices in Africa.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; International Partnership against AIDS in Africa

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2000 Sep. 111 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; Summary Booklet of Best Practices Series No. 2; UNAIDS/00.34E)

    AIDS is now the leading killer in sub-Saharan Africa. Whereas 200,000 people died as a result of conflict or war in Africa in 1998, AIDS killed 2.2 million. The progression of the disease has outpaced all projections. In 1991, WHO projected that in 1999 there would be 9 million infected individuals and nearly 5 million cumulative deaths in Africa. The reality in 2000 is two to three times higher, with 34.3 million infected individuals and 18.8 cumulative deaths. Nearly 70 per cent of the world’s HIV infection and 90 per cent of deaths from AIDS are to be found in a region that is home to just 10 per cent of the world’s population. In the sub-Saharan region, infection levels are highest, access to care is lowest, and social and economic safety nets that might help families cope with the impact of the epidemic are badly frayed. Resources are not keeping pace with the challenge. Incidence of the disease is increasing three times faster than the money to control it. Current national AIDS activities in Africa must be expanded dramatically to make an impact on the epidemic. African leaders are demonstrating unprecedented leadership in fighting HIV/AIDS; the time is ripe for an extraordinary effort. The International Partnership against AIDS in Africa (IPAA) is such a mobilization. At the same time, the Best Practice process – accumulating and applying knowledge about what is working and not working in different situations and contexts – is crucial within the framework of the Partnership. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    187190

    Care, women and AIDS. Media backgrounder.

    Global Coalition on Women and AIDS; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2004 Feb 2. [2] p.

    All over the world women are expected to take the lead in domestic work and in providing care to family members. HIV and AIDS have significantly increased the care burden for many women. Poverty and poor public services have also combined with AIDS to turn the care burden for women into a crisis with far-reaching social, health and economic consequences. The term 'care economy' is sometimes used to describe the many tasks carded out mostly by women and girls at home such as cooking, cleaning, fetching water and many other activities associated with caring for the young, sick and elderly in the household. The value of the time, energy and resources required to perform this unpaid work is hardly recognized and accounted for, despite its critical contribution to the overall economy and society in general. Women and girls pay an opportunity cost when undertaking unpaid care work for HIV and AIDS-related illnesses since their ability to participate in income generation, education, and skills building diminish. AIDS intensifies the feminization of poverty, particularly in hard-hit countries, and disempowers women. Entire families are also affected as vulnerability increases when women's time caring for the sick is taken away from other productive tasks within the household. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    180456

    What does budget 2003/4 allocate for HIV / AIDS?

    Hickey A

    AIDS Analysis Africa. 2003 Jun-Jul; 14(1):6-8.

    Given that Budget 2003/4 significantly steps up the amount of funds going to the provinces for HIV/AIDS, there are now two critical questions facing us. 1. Extra money for HIV/AIDS was put into the Equitable Share in Budget 2003/4. Will provinces use the additional funds in their equitable share grant to increase their provincial health budgets and boost funding to HIV/AIDS interventions? Or will those funds be diverted to other priorities as identified by individual provinces? 2. Will provinces be able to spend the added funds? Absorption is a real problem-provincial departments are already struggling with capacity in terms of lack of financial management and programme management skills, insufficient staff, or unfilled posts. This issue is not unique to HIV/AIDS but symptomatic of other social sector programmes. In essence, analysis of Budget 2003/4 suggests that--from a public finance perspective--the main challenge for government's response to HIV/AIDS in the foreseeable future is not going to be lack of financial resources, but the capacity to spend. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    166296

    Comfort and hope. Six case studies on mobilizing family and community care for and by people with HIV / AIDS.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1999 Jun. 94 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/99.10E)

    This booklet presents six case studies on mobilizing family and community care for and by people with HIV/AIDS. The case studies included in this collection stem from the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) presentation entitled, “Home and Community Care: It Works!," which documents the experiences and lessons learned by community-level projects in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. These six case studies include: 1) Project Hope--Projeto Esperanca de Sao Miguel Paulista, Brazil; 2) The Diocese of Kitui HIV/AIDS Programme, Kenya; 3) The Drug User Program, Ikhlas Community Centre, Pink Triangle, Malaysia; 4) The Tateni Home Care Services, South Africa; 5) Sanpatong Home-based Care Project, Thailand; and 6) The Chirumhanzu Home-based Care Project, Zimbabwe. It is noted that all these projects were chosen because they reflected most or all of what UNAIDS considers key elements of home and community care, as well as most of UNAIDS’ Best Practice criteria.
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