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  1. 1
    323501
    Peer Reviewed

    AIDS: can we meet the 2010 target?

    Senior K

    Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2008 Jan; 8(1):14.

    A report from the International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC) warns that meeting the "near universal access target" to AIDS drugs access by the 2010 deadline will require an enormous effort by governments, global agencies, and drug companies. According to the report, which looked at AIDS treatment access in 14 countries, "scale-up is working but high prices, patent and registration barriers, and ongoing stock-outs are core issues impeding AIDS drug delivery". "The issues highlighted in this report are real and widespread", said Nathan Ford of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF; Johannesburg, South Africa). The HIV programmes run by MSF across the developing world are struggling against user fees, high drug costs, lack of human resources, and poor health infrastructure, he told TLID. The ITPC, a group of 1000 treatment activists from more than 125 countries, highlights that the high cost of antiretroviral drugs is a particular barrier in Argentina, China, and Belize. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    322025

    The practice of charging user fees at the point of service delivery for HIV / AIDS treatment and care.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005 Dec. [4] p. (WHO Discussion Paper; WHO/HIV/2005.11)

    The global movement to expand access to antiretroviral treatment for people living with HIV/AIDS as part of a comprehensive response to the HIV pandemic is grounded in both the human right to health and in evidence on public-health outcomes. However, for many individuals in poor communities, the cost of treatment remains an insurmountable obstacle. Even with sliding fee scales, cost recovery at the point of service delivery is likely to depress uptake of antiretroviral treatment and decrease adherence by those already receiving it. Therefore, countries are being advised to adopt a policy of free access at the point of service delivery to HIV care and treatment, including antiretroviral therapy. This recommendation is based on the best available evidence and experience in countries. It is warranted as an element of the exceptional response needed to turn back the AIDS epidemic. With the endorsement by G8 leaders in July 2005 and UN Member States in September 2005 of efforts to move towards universal access to HIV treatment and care by 2010, health sector financing strategies must now move to the top of the international agenda. Rapid scale-up of programmes within the framework of the "3 by 5" target has underscored the challenge of equity, particularly for marginalized and rural populations. It is apparent that user charges at the point of service delivery "institutionalize exclusion" and undermine efforts towards universal access to health services. Abolishing them, however, requires prompt, sustained attention to long-term health system financing strategies, at both national and international levels. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    319303

    Better procurement and supply management of HIV / AIDs drugs and supplies.

    Osewe PL; Habiyambere V; Li Bassi L

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Global HIV / AIDS Program, 2005 Dec. 5 p.

    Many countries are working to expand access to antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for millions of people with HIV/AIDS. Uninterrupted and timely supplies of safe, effective and affordable ARV drugs are needed. They must be dispensed correctly by health workers, and consistently taken by patients. A partnership between the World Bank and World Health Organization (WHO), in collaboration with the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria (GFATM), UNICEF, UNAIDS, and the American and French Governments is helping countries build capacity to procure and manage HIV/AIDS drugs and related supplies. This effort has helped support an increase in the number of people on ARV treatment in low- and middle income countries, from 400,000 at the end of 2003, to about one million in June 2005. (author's)
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  4. 4
    306305
    Peer Reviewed

    The WHO public-health approach to antiretroviral treatment against HIV in resource-limited settings.

    Gilks CF; Crowley S; Ekpini R; Gove S; Perriens J

    Lancet. 2006 Aug 5; 368(9534):505-510.

    WHO has proposed a public-health approach to antiretroviral therapy (ART) to enable scaling-up access to treatment for HIV-positive people in developing countries, recognising that the western model of specialist physician management and advanced laboratory monitoring is not feasible in resource-poor settings. In this approach, standardised simplified treatment protocols and decentralised service delivery enable treatment to be delivered to large numbers of HIV-positive adults and children through the public and private sector. Simplified tools and approaches to clinical decision-making, centred on the "four Ss"--when to: start drug treatment; substitute for toxicity; switch after treatment failure; and stop--enable lower level health-care workers to deliver care. Simple limited formularies have driven large-scale production of fixed-dose combinations for first-line treatment for adults and lowered prices, but to ensure access to ART in the poorest countries, the care and drugs should be given free at point of service delivery. Population-based surveillance for acquired and transmitted resistance is needed to address concerns that switching regimens on the basis of clinical criteria for failure alone could lead to widespread emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The integrated management of adult or childhood illness (IMAI/IMCI) facilitates decentralised implementation that is integrated within existing health systems. Simplified operational guidelines, tools, and training materials enable clinical teams in primary-care and second-level facilities to deliver HIV prevention, HIV care, and ART, and to use a standardised patient-tracking system. (author's)
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