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  1. 1
    302323

    Caring for children orphaned by AIDS [editorial]

    Moy R

    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 1999 Apr; 45(2):64-65.

    The Joint United Nation Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) chose 'Children Living in a World with AIDS' as its theme for the 1997 World AIDS Campaign. The overall aim of the campaign was to create 'an increased understanding of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and its global dimensions, with an emphasis on promoting action and social policies to prevent HIV transmission and to minimise the epidemic's impact on children, their families and their communities'. Among the facts that emerged in the UNAIDS documentation for this campaign were the following: everyday 1000 children become infected with HIV; of the 1.5 million people worldwide who died of AIDS in 1996, 350 000 were children; AIDS may increase infant mortality by as much as 75 per cent and under-5 child mortality by more than 100 per cent in the regions most affected by the disease by the year 2000; 90 per cent of HIV positive children under the age of 15 years are infected through vertical mother to child Transmission; nearly 1 million children are living with HIV and suffer the physical and psychological consequences of infection; over 9 million children are estimated to have lost one or other or both parents to AIDS. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    296073

    A call to action. Children: the missing face of AIDS.

    UNICEF; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005. 25 p.

    The world must take urgent account of the specific impact of AIDS on children, or there will be no chance of meeting Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 6 - to halt and begin to reverse the spread of the disease by 2015. Failure to meet the goal on HIV/AIDS will adversely affect the world's chances of progress on the other MDGs. The disease continues to frustrate efforts to reduce extreme poverty and hunger, to provide universal primary education, and to reduce child mortality and improve maternal health. World leaders, from both industrialized and developing countries, have repeatedly made commitments to step up their efforts to fight the spread of HIV/AIDS. They are beginning to increase the political leadership and the resources needed to fight the disease. Significant progress is being made in charting the past and future course of the pandemic, in providing free antiretroviral treatment to those who need it, and in expanding the coverage of prevention services. But children are still missing out. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    184710

    Orphans and other children affected by HIV / AIDS. A UNICEF fact sheet.

    UNICEF. HIV / AIDS Unit

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2002. [2] p. (UNICEF Fact Sheet)

    By 2001, AIDS had killed one or both parents of 13.4 million children still under the age of 15. Their ranks will soon be swelled by millions of additional children who are living with sick and dying parents. The tragedy continues to worsen as the disease kills everlarger numbers of people. By 2010, the total number of children orphaned by HIV/AIDS is expected to nearly double to 25 million. HIV/AIDS has killed more people in sub-Saharan Africa than anywhere else, and the vast majority of orphans and other children affected by HIV/AIDS are also in this region. By the end of 2001, AIDS had orphaned approximately 995,000 children in Nigeria; 989,000 in Ethiopia; 782,000 in Zimbabwe; 662,000 in South Africa; and 572,000 in Zambia. As HIV/AIDS epidemics worsen in other regions – such as in the Caribbean and in parts of Asia – the number of children orphaned by AIDS in these areas will also increase dramatically. (excerpt)
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