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  1. 1
    042317

    Management training for IEC.

    Bhatia B; Mathur KB

    POPULATION MANAGER: ICOMP REVIEW. 1987 Jun; 1(1):19-22.

    Communication plays an essential role in creating the necessary social climate for the development and adoption of population policies and in supporting actions undertaken to implement these policies. To be effective, however, there must be integrated communication for population and development programs. In addition to knowledge of the mass media and community organizations, communicators in the field of population must have the ability to collaborate with other development programs in an intersectoral effort, Toward this end, UNESCO, in collaboration with the Asia-Pacific Institute for broadcasting Development, has organized specialized courses in the management of population communication programs. A review of the situation at the time this program was initiated revealed that IEC directors had minimal knowledge and understanding of the role of IEC in family planning programs, little practical experience in planning and managing multimedia, community-based, interpersonal communication activities, and these programs had no scientifically established data base. As result, a pilot 2-week course comprised of o modules was held in India in 1983. Module 1 focused on a systematic problem-solving approach to IEC program situations, Module ii emphasized human resource management, and Module III was designed to impart specific communication skills. The course was subsequently expanded to 3 weeks, and has in the past 3 years involved 54 persons from 20 countries. Unesco has also developed a population communication course in collaboration with the Arab States Broadcasting Union.
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  2. 2
    000233

    [Women and development: ideas and strategies of international organizations] Femmes et developpement: idees et strategies des organisations internationales.

    Mignot-Levebvre Y

    Revue Tiers Monde. 1980 Oct-Dec; 21(84):845-62.

    The International Year of the Woman, which marked the beginning in 1975 of the Decade of the Woman organized by UNESCO, had as its goal the sensibilization of the public to the problems of women, the diffusion of results of studies conducted on women in several countries, and the elaboration of new strategies to improve women's status worldwide. Factors which played a role in advertising worldwide discrimination against women were external to UNESCO, such as the birth of radical feminist movements in the 1960s and the diffusion of new feminist ideas by the mass media, and internal to UNESCO, such as the great number of studies sponsored and financed by UNESCO on the condition of women, and especially of third world women. The revision of strategies within UNESCO is visible in the changing themes of the studies sponsored from 1965 to 1980. Studies done between 1960-70 dealt essentially with the importance of primary, secondary, and university education for women. Studies done between 1970-75 investigated the relation between formal education and actual probability of women's employment. Studies sponsored between 1975-80 investigated the right of women to equal participation in the national economy and development. Unfortunately, the global budget dedicated to women's studies is only of 13.5 million French francs. Ongoing studies examine whether feminist ideas are applicable to third world countries, or if they are to be reviewed according to different societies and cultural environments.
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  3. 3
    091196

    Evaluation of the regional advisory services in population education and communication in Sub-Saharan Africa of FAO, the ILO and UNESCO, 1978-1982.

    Blanch JM; Draper M; Roque F; Wayland S; Trone K; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1983 Jun. iv, 64 p.

    This evaluation was conducted to assess alternative modes of providing regional population education and communication (PEC) advisory services in the African Region in the future, in addition to assessing past performance of existing projects. In the absence of specific and measurable project objectives, as well as uniform, reliable and comparative data for the different projects included in this evaluation, it was not possible to determine exactly the quantity and quality of the achievements of the regional advisory projects over the period under review. Nevertheless, it is concluded that the achivements had been relatively limited, partially because of inherent difficulties associated with the provision of advisory services in the region (e.g., distances, inter-and intra-country communication problems) but more so because of weaknesses in the formulation and implementation of the regional advisory projects. These weaknesses include: 1) differing views on the part of the Executing Agencies and the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) about the functions of the regional advisors which underlie the rather vaguely defined functions presented in the project documents; 2) insufficient planning of the regional advisory teams' activities; and 3) recruitment difficulties which led to vacancies and high turnover as well as to the hiring of partially qualified advisors. Furthermore, the present arrangement for the delivery of regional PEC advisory services, e.g., separate agency teams and advisors located in different countries, impedes the effective delivery of services because the advisors under this arrangement cannot function as 1 team. It is recommended that the functions of the regional PEC advisors in Africa be concentrated on assistance to country project formulation, advice on country project management and systemenatic particiaption in country project monitoring and evaluation. Recommended regional PEC advisory services are 1 team for PEC in the non-formal sector and another team for population education in the formal sector. Other recommendations deal with the role of Headquarters vis a vis regional follow-up and monitoring/supervision of regional advisors, other in-country activites and need for resident country advisors.
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