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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    303294

    AIDS and HIV infection: information for United Nations employees and their families. Revised.

    Mikulencak M

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2000 Apr. [46] p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection. Key Material)

    This booklet is a straightforward and practical resource, designed to give you and your families the most up-to-date information available on HIV and AIDS, such as: basic facts about HIV/AIDS, how it is transmitted and how it is not transmitted; ways to protect yourselves and your families against infection; advice on HIV antibody testing and how to cope with the disease if you or a family member test positive; a global overview of the epidemic and the UN's response to AIDS at international and country levels; and a list of valuable resources to direct you and your family to additional information or support services. This booklet also contains the United Nations HIV/AIDS Personnel Policy. It is important that each of us be aware of the policy and be guided by it in our daily lives. I urge you to seek out additional information and to stay informed. The United Nations Staff Counsellors and the United Nations Medical Directors, both part of the Office of Human Resource Management, are available to answer your questions. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    186765

    Mainstreaming women in development: four agency approaches.

    Jahan R

    In: Women, international development, and politics: the bureaucratic mire. Updated and expanded edition, edited by Kathleen Staudt. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Temple University Press, 1997. 311-329.

    The world has witnessed a remarkable surge in the women's movement that has put forward over the last two decades a bold vision of social transformation and challenged the global community to respond. This article reviews the response of one set of key players: the international donor agencies dealing with women's development issues. It focuses on the actions of four donors, two bilateral (Norway and Canada) and two multilateral (the World Bank and the United Nations Development Program) and attempts to assess their performance in the last twenty years in broad strokes. It asks three basic sets of questions. First, what were the articulated objectives of their special policies and measures to promote women's advancement? Were they responsive to the aspiration of the women's movement? Second, did the donors adopt any identifiable set of strategies to realize the policy objectives? Were they effective? And finally, what were the results? Was there any quantitative and qualitative evidence to suggest progress? The two bilateral donors--Canada and Norway--were selected because they have a reputation among donors of mounting major initiatives for women. They number among the few agencies who adopted detailed women-in-development (WID) or gender-and-development (GAD) policies. In contrast, the two multilateral donors--United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the World Bank---were chosen not on the strength of their WlD/GAD mandates and policies, but because of the influence they wield in shaping the development strategies of the countries of the South. The World Bank through its conditionalities often dictates policy reforms to aid-recipient governments. The UNDP, as the largest fund, has a big presence within the United Nations system. The actions of these two agencies-- what they advocate and what they omit or marginalize--have a strong impact on the policy analysis and investments of the aid-recipient countries. The study is primarily based on published and unpublished data collected from the four donor agencies. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    205329

    The protection of migrant workers and international labour standards.

    Bohning WR

    International Migration/Migrations Internationales/Migraciones Internacionales. 1988 Jun; 26(2):133-46.

    International labor standards take the form of Conventions and Recommendations that embody the agreements reached by a 2/3 majority of the representatives of Governments, Employers, and Workers of International Labour Office (ILO) member states. Originally designed to guard against the danger that 1 country or other would keep down wages and working conditions to gain competitive advantage and thereby undermine advances elsewhere, international labor standards have also been inspired by humanitarian concerns--the visible plight of workers and the physical dangers of industrialization and by the notion of social justice, which embraces wellbeing and dignity, security, and equality as well as a measure of participation in economic and social matters. ILO standards apply to workers generally and therefore also to migrant workers, irrespective of the fact that the general standards are complemented by standards especially for migrant workers. The social security protection of migrant workers has been dealt with in ILO instruments primarily from the angle of equality of treatment but also from that of the maintenance of acquired rights and rights in course of acquisition, including the payment of benefits to entitled persons resident abroad. The ILO Conventions on migrant workers and the Recommendations which supplement them deal with practically all aspects of the work and life of non-nationals such as recruitment matters, information to be made available, contract conditions, medical examination and attention, customs, exemption for personal effects, assistance in settling into their new environment, vocational training, promotion at work, job security and alternative employment, liberty of movement, participation in the cultural life of the state as well as maintenance of their own culture, transfer of earnings and savings, family reunification and visits, appeal against unjustified termination of employment or expulsion, and return assistance. ILO's supervisory mechanism consists basically of a dialogue between the ILO and the Government that is responsible for a law, regulation, or practice alleged to be in contravention of principles it voluntarily accepted. The control machinery is often set in motion by workers' organizations. The UN General Assembly is currently elaborating a new instrument designed to cover both regular and irregular migrant workers and their families.
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  4. 4
    270399

    The management of UNFPA programmes in the field.

    Duncan R

    POPULI. 1987; 14(4):4-14.

    Field operations are the cutting edge of population activities of the UNFPA. It is there that services are provided; policies are tested in the crucible of reality, and progress measured. Aware that these were uncharted waters, the Fund leadership initiated a bold but carefully studied move. It was designed to move from research, dissemination and broad policy prescription into field programs to assist individual governments to convert knowledge to action-oriented policies to be implemented through practical projects that would reach all segments of society. UNFPA developed a series of committees which manage the program, set major policies, approve projects and control the finances of the program under the guidance of the UNDP Governing Council. This article summarizes how these committees operate in relation the evolution of the field program, interaction with other governments, and the monitoring and evaluation of the programs. While the field management system has generated some remarkable developments considering the complexity of the population issue, field staff have identified some of the critical issues concerned with evolving new program approaches.
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  5. 5
    033841

    General lessons learned from evaluations of MCH/FP projects in Botswana, Malawi, Swaziland and Zambia.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1984 Dec. iv, 41 p.

    4 maternal-child health/family planning (MCH/FP) projects were evaluated by the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) in the Southern Africa Region between 1981-1984. The projects were in Botswana, Malawi, Swaziland and Zambia. An overriding finding at the time of the Evaluation Missions was the acceptance of family planning (child spacing) by all 4 governments, when at the onset of the projects, family planning was either not included in the project documents or was included only as a minor contributant to the MCH programs. The intervention by UNFPA was very important for the acceptance and promotion of family planning activities by the governments. The Evaluation Missions concluded that there were 3 primary reasons for the successful intervention: UNFPA has a broad mandate to provide assistance in MCH and FP, a commitment to development projects in line with the governments' priorities, and the ability to fund projects very quickly, facilitating project implementation. Each of the 4 projects is assessed in terms of population policy changes, MCH/FP program strategy and serive delivery, organization of the MCH/Fp unit, health education, training, evaluation and research systems, and administration and management. Essential factors affecting the project are outlined and recommendations made. The last section discusses general lessons derived from the MCH/FP projects evaluated. 5 areas are identified where similar problems exist to varying degrees in all the projects evaluated. These are: training of medical personnel in FP (the main MCH/FP service provider in these projects was the nurse/midwife); supervision of personnel and the supply and distribution of contraceptives; research and evaluation, especially regarding the sociocultural setting of target populations and the inadequacy of existing service statistics and other sources of data; project monitoring (technical and financial) and finally project execution by the World Health Organization (WHO). Specifically in regard to the recruitment of experts, the provision of supplies and equipment, and the provision of funds for local costs, WHO execution has been deficient.
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  6. 6
    268451

    Report on the evaluation of UNFPA assistance to the Sudan population and housing census of 1983: project SUD/79/P01.

    Kannisto V; McWilliam J

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1985 Mar. xi, 40 p.

    Since the evaluation report of the 1973 Census of Sudan made recommendations on how to improve census implementation for the 1980 round, UNFPA felt it to be important to see if the 1983 census took them into account and if it achieved better results. The project document included 3 objectives concerning data collection and analysis: the availability of accurate and up-to-date information on the total population of Sudan, on the components of population growth, and on demographic, social and economic characteristics; and 2 objectives concerning institution building: the availability of trained statistical personnel and the strengthening of data processing facilities. 2 of the 5 objectives have been achieved--up-to-date information on the total population of Sudan and for all recognized civil sub-divisions is available and a new computer facility with adequate capacity and configuration has been installed and is in operation. The caliber of staff in the census office is high, and the training program overall was adequate. The census communication campaign emphasized the use of mass media. Overall, the publicity for the census was considered by the Mission to have been good. Although the enumeration took longer than scheduled in some areas, the observance of the enumeration timetable can be considered satisfactory. Data preparation and electronic processing have been severely delayed due to the low productivity of the computer staff. The strong points of the project were the high priority given to the census by the government; the better planning for the 1983 census as compared with the 1973 census; and the high quality of technical assistance provided by UN advisors. Weak points have been the lack of long-term resident advisors in general census organization, cartography and data analysis; the delay in the provision of government and UNFPA inputs; and the loss of trained personnel from the Department of Statistics, particularly in data processing.
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  7. 7
    268450

    Report on the evaluation of UNFPA assistance to the civil registration demonstration project in Kenya: project KEN/79/P04.

    Kannisto V; Makannah TJ; Mehta DC; McWilliam J

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Dec. xi, 36 p.

    Kenya established a compulsory vital statistics and civil registration system in 1963 and it was extended nationwide in phases until it covered the whole country by 1971. Serious under-registration of births and deaths however, has persisted. In order to improve registration coverage, the government submitted a proposal to UNFPA to support experimentation with ways to promote registration in some model areas. The original project document included 4 immediate objectives: the strengthening of the civil registration system in the model areas including the creation of a new organizational structure, the training of project personnel and the decentralization of registration activities; the improvement of methods and procedures of registration through experimentation; the collection of reliable vital statistics in the model areas; and, the establishment of a public awareness program on the need for civil registration to ensure the continuation and extension of the new system. Of the 4 objectives of the project, 2 have been achieved--the strengthening of civil registration in the model areas and the improvement of methods and procedures of registration. The major deficiency during the project period was the lack of required staff in the field. The primary feature which distinguishes the project is that traditional birth attendants and village elders become key persons at the village level and act as registration informants after receiving training. The strong points of the project are the high quality of technical assistance provided by the executing agency, the close collaboration among various government departments, and the choice of project strategy and model area. Recommendations have been made to correct the problems of a lack of key personnel at the head office and in the field, and the expansion of registration to new areas before consolidation was completed in the old areas.
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  8. 8
    268445

    Report on the evaluation of UNFPA assistance to the family health programme of Zambia: project ZAM/74/PO2 (February - March 1984).

    Ryder B; Burton J; McWilliam J

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Sep. x, 38, [5] p.

    The objective of the Family Health Program of Zambia is to enhance the health and welfare of Zambians, particularly mothers and children, through an increase in coverage of the population served through under-5s clinics, pre- and post-natal services and child spacing activities. The Mission found that the strong points of the project are the increasing commitment of the Government to incorporate family planning activities as an essential component of its family health and primary health care programs; the training and health education components of the program; and the enthusiasm and ability of the Zambian Enrolled Nurse/Midwives in organizing maternal child health/family planning services at service delivery points. Factors which appear to have hindered a more effective project performance have been the restriction on prescribing contraceptives by anyone but physicians; the imbalance in implementation among the project components; the failure to appoint international and national staff to key positions and with a timing that would have enabled staff members to support each other as members of a coordinated team; weak supervision; no research and evaluation activities; transport problems; the lack of use of, and updating of, the project plans; and the absence of a tripartite review early in the project's life to address implementation problems.
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  9. 9
    023375

    Training of health personnel for implementation of ORT program.

    Pal SC

    [Unpublished] 1983. Presented at the International Conference on Oral Rehydration Therapy, June 7-10, 1983, Washington, D.C. 3 p.

    Training of health services personnel at all levels and education of both mothers and community members should be an essential and integral part of the Diarrheal Diseases Control Program. Experience demonstrates that mere distribution of oral rehydration solution (ORS) in the community fails to bring about its proper utilization. The National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases (NICED) in Calcutta monitors training of health personnel at all levels in connection with the National CDD Program of India. Since 1980, 37 2-day national seminars on OR therapy (ORT) were organized by NICED with assistance of the World Health Organization (WHO). Thus far 1754 medical personnel were trained, including 1196 clinicians, 174 public health doctors, 259 health administrators, and 125 of various other categories. The training program was evaluated by WHO in 1982. Wherever training was conducted, there was a significant increase in the proportion of diarrhea cases treated with ORS. Also observed was a downward mortality trend. It is proposed to organize about 400 district level training courses to train the primary health center (PHC) doctors during 1983-84. As a WHO-collaborating Center for Research and Training in Diarrheal Diseases, NICED has conducted 6 intercountry/interregional courses on the different aspects relating to the CDD Program. 92 scientists from 11 countries have been trained. A key question is who to train first if the resources are scarce. Since the community health worker will have to play the pivotal role in home delivery of ORT, they have to be trained by the doctors in charge of PHCs. Thus, the doctors at the different levels of the health care delivery system will have to be trained first. If the decision is made to implement salt/sugar mixture at the house level rather than packets of ORS, the training of the community health workers will have to be geared and designed in such a way that they will be in a position to educate the mothers to prepare the homemade mixture properly. Training should be an integral part of a broad PHC training program. Doctors will be the best trainers because of the clinical nature of the training involved. To improve the training components of the ORT program, the following steps need to be taken: motivation of the national CDD program managers to undertake the training program, preparation of curriculum and teaching aids for the trainers at different levels, establishment of clinical demonstration centers, and provision of adequate funds for training.
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  10. 10
    091196

    Evaluation of the regional advisory services in population education and communication in Sub-Saharan Africa of FAO, the ILO and UNESCO, 1978-1982.

    Blanch JM; Draper M; Roque F; Wayland S; Trone K; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1983 Jun. iv, 64 p.

    This evaluation was conducted to assess alternative modes of providing regional population education and communication (PEC) advisory services in the African Region in the future, in addition to assessing past performance of existing projects. In the absence of specific and measurable project objectives, as well as uniform, reliable and comparative data for the different projects included in this evaluation, it was not possible to determine exactly the quantity and quality of the achievements of the regional advisory projects over the period under review. Nevertheless, it is concluded that the achivements had been relatively limited, partially because of inherent difficulties associated with the provision of advisory services in the region (e.g., distances, inter-and intra-country communication problems) but more so because of weaknesses in the formulation and implementation of the regional advisory projects. These weaknesses include: 1) differing views on the part of the Executing Agencies and the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) about the functions of the regional advisors which underlie the rather vaguely defined functions presented in the project documents; 2) insufficient planning of the regional advisory teams' activities; and 3) recruitment difficulties which led to vacancies and high turnover as well as to the hiring of partially qualified advisors. Furthermore, the present arrangement for the delivery of regional PEC advisory services, e.g., separate agency teams and advisors located in different countries, impedes the effective delivery of services because the advisors under this arrangement cannot function as 1 team. It is recommended that the functions of the regional PEC advisors in Africa be concentrated on assistance to country project formulation, advice on country project management and systemenatic particiaption in country project monitoring and evaluation. Recommended regional PEC advisory services are 1 team for PEC in the non-formal sector and another team for population education in the formal sector. Other recommendations deal with the role of Headquarters vis a vis regional follow-up and monitoring/supervision of regional advisors, other in-country activites and need for resident country advisors.
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  11. 11
    118854

    Report on the evaluation of UNFPA assistance to the Swaziland family planning programme.

    Ryder B; Burton J; Frieiro L

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1982 Dec. xi, 44, [10] p. (Project SWA/75/P01)

    The long range objective of this project (1976-1981) was to improve and enhance the health and welfare of mothers and children, especially in rural areas. In assessing Project achievements and the degree to which progress toward the long term objective has been accomplished, the Evaluation Mission found that the immediate objectives had, to a large degree, been met within the general framework of the Ministry of Health's (MOH) development program. Service delivery points in governmental, mission private and industrial/plantation health facilities are now widely distributed throughout Swaziland. The integration of preventive and curative is clearly in place in the rural health clinics and health centers. Analysis of service statistics data indicates that a large % of pregnant women attend antenatal clinics. Family planning services are now offered in 86 clinics with 27,094 clinic attendances recorded for 1981. The pill is the most popular method, followed by condoms, injectables and IUDs. An adequate though incipient health education program is functioning. The MOH strengthened the health infrastructure for, and has in place a program of, maternal child health (MCH) and family planning (FP). The strong points of the program are the government's commitment to MCH/FP, the general strategy, the training component, the number and quality of staff involved in service delivery, the number of service delivery points and the system of recruitment and the employment of Rural Health Motivators (RHM). Weak points, which appear to have hindered a more effective program performance, are planning and management, the lack of solid socio-anthropological knowledge to base, the lack of a focal point for FP, supervision at all levels and the lack of monitoring and evaluation which, if properly undertaken, could have led to changes and adjustments in the program. Future activities supported by the United Nations Fund for Population in the organization and management of family planning activities within the MCH program and within other government and voluntary organizations. UNFPA should help the government prepare a new proposal for UNFPA assistance to family planning activities in the country and should consider supporting supervision and training activities.
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