Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    148868

    Introduction.

    Magno AR; Velasco RS

    In: Salas Forum papers on population, development and environment, edited by Renato S. Velasco, Alexander R. Magno. Quezon City, Philippines, Rafael M. Salas Foundation, 1996. viii-xv.

    The seven topics that are outlined in the book Salas Forum Papers on Population Development and Environment are discussed. The book also profiles the late Mr. Rafael Salas as the Founding Executive Director of the Rafael M. Salas Foundation, a nongovernmental organization based in the Philippines and funded by the UN Population Fund. Mr. Salas was a man profoundly committed to uplifting the Filipino people from poverty. He embraced the ethos that the first responsibility of the political leader is to secure his people's destiny from the vagaries of constant change and the dire consequences of inappropriate policy action. In present days, this ethos is understood as sustainable development and calls for a moderation of the present needs so that people do not diminish the ability of future generations to meet their needs too. He also correlated population dynamics to achieving sustainable development, which is evident in the discussions during the seven sessions of the Salas Forum compiled in this book. The topics included 1) a presentation entitled, Population, Resources and the Philippine Future ; 2) discussion of the six policy papers on population and development dialogue; 3) demographic trends in the Philippines; 4) dynamics between population management, sustainable development and organized religion; 5) the national security aspect of population planning; 6) the gender aspect of social transformation; and 7) debates on population and environment.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    148867

    Foreword.

    Mehra S

    In: Salas Forum papers on population, development and environment, edited by Renato S. Velasco, Alexander R. Magno. Quezon City, Philippines, Rafael M. Salas Foundation, 1996. vi-vii.

    The UN Population Fund (UNFPA) in the Philippines, led by Rafael Salas, has changed from a fledgling agency into one of the most dynamic and financially stable UN agencies. The vision and principles he laid during the inception of UNFPA has been and will remain valid for years to come. These include the respect for national sovereignty and for individual human rights, organizational flexibility, innovation and expediency. Following the death of Mr. Salas, the Rafael M. Salas Foundation was established in the Philippines, supported by the UNFPA. One of its programs is the annual Salas Forum, which serves as a fruitful arena where the multi-faceted concerns of development may be examined dispassionately and intelligently. As a nongovernmental endeavor, it opens an important channel where sober debate is conducted between and among the relevant actors in the formulation of population and development policies. The papers presented to the Forum and the deliberation helps to clarify problems and possible solutions to the often ambiguous and complex process of development.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    138709

    Participation through intermediary NGOs.

    Carroll T; Schmidt M; Bebbington T

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Environmentally and Socially Sustainable Development Network, Social Development, 1996 Feb. [2], v, 59 p. (Social Development Paper No. 12)

    This report defines types of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and identifies strategies for identifying participatory NGOs. It also discusses capacity building, the tension between service delivery and capacity building, the potential to increase the scale of activity among NGOs, project or process development, and linkages between NGOs and government. The World Bank now aims to foster more participatory community-based development among development-oriented NGOs trying to reduce poverty. Development-oriented NGOs tend to have the strongest grassroots links and the greatest experience reaching disadvantaged groups with innovative methods. The World Bank has historically ignored participatory processes. The challenge is to locate NGOs willing to collaborate and those that have sufficient capacity to meet goals; to support the participatory character of NGOs; and to help reduce friction in styles with the operations of the World Bank and governments. Highly participatory NGOs tend to work on a very small scale. Another challenge is to build the institutional capacity of NGO partners. The usual management training is unsuitable and insufficient for NGO needs. History, politics, and ideology define the differences in links between governments and NGOs. Partners may be constrained by government attitudes and regulations. The cases confirm the importance of a clear, shared understanding of partner NGO roles; a flexible, staged process of collaboration; opportunities for strong, relatively homogenous common interest-based groups; a supportive, nonintrusive state context; and a shared view and willingness to cooperate among major donors.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    121888

    Programme of Action adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994.

    International Conference on Population and Development [ICPD] (1994: Cairo)

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1996. viii, 166 p.

    This document is a pocket edition of the Programme of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Part 1 of the booklet contains the text of the Programme of Action. Chapter 1 contains the Preamble, and chapter 2 describes the principles upon which the Programme of Action is based. For each of the major headings in the remaining 14 chapters, the basis of action, objectives, and specific actions are presented. Chapter 3 covers the interrelationships between population, sustained economic growth, and sustainable development. Chapter 4 deals with gender equality, equity, and the empowerment of women. The fifth chapter looks at the roles, rights, composition, and structure of the family, and chapter 6 is concerned with population growth and structure. Chapter 7 discusses issues related to reproductive rights and reproductive health, while chapter 8 concentrates on health, morbidity, and mortality. The ninth chapter is devoted to population distribution, urbanization, and internal migration, and chapter 10 focuses on international migration. The relationship of population, development, and education is considered in chapter 11, and research issues are included in chapter 12. Chapters 13-15 relay what is needed in the areas of national action, international cooperation, and partnerships with the nongovernmental sector, respectively, and the final chapter reviews the necessary national, regional, and international follow-up activities. Part 2 of the booklet reproduces the oral and written statements and reservations about the Programme of Action submitted by various countries.
    Add to my documents.