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  1. 1
    297795

    HIV and AIDS in Armenia: a socio-cultural approach.

    Papoyan A; Arakelyan A; Bakshinyan E

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Cultural Policies and Intercultural Dialogue, Culture and Development Section, 2005. 83 p. (CLT/CPD/CAD-05/4B)

    Evaluating and effectively responding to the global challenge of the HIV epidemic requires an indepth understanding of the strong correlation between health and social, cultural and economic conditions, and how these shape behaviour at both individual and societal levels. While the number of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in Armenia is comparatively low, the rate is growing rapidly. Current prevalence among officially registered cases is 0.02%. The actual rate of prevalence is estimated to be approximately ten times higher, with a greater prevalence among distinct key population groups. Among the factors driving the HIV epidemic in the country - which faces profound socio-economic, political and cultural changes - are: a particular negative and fearful attitude towards the disease; discrimination against people living with HIV; low level of HIV and AIDS awareness among the population; and an increase in injecting drug use and commercial sex work. In Armenia, HIV-positive people are primarily associated with three key populations that are socially marginalized: commercial sex workers (CSWs), injecting drug users (IDUs) and men who have sex with men (MSM). For many years an individual's positive HIV status has been equated with immoral behaviour. As a result, PLHIV face aggression. Moreover, it is taboo to openly discuss HIV and AIDS, resulting in the further isolation of PLHIV. Currently many programmes have been implemented in Armenia to surmount stigmatization. However, this process demands numerous long-term activities and commitments from the state. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    297793

    The evaluation of UNESCO Brazil's contribution to the Brazilian AIDS Programme: final report. [Evaluación del aporte de UNESCO Brasil al programa brasileño de lucha contra el SIDA: informe final]

    Stern E

    Brasilia, Brazil, UNESCO, 2005 Jul. [140] p. (BR/2005/PI/H/19)

    This report focuses on the evaluation of the AIDS II programme, as implemented by the UNESCO office in Brazil. The AIDS epidemic has been addressed with particular vigour in Brazil, which is widely recognised as a country that has developed a distinctive and successful model of policy coordination and implementation with regard to HIV/AIDS. In addition to substantial national investment, Brazil has enjoyed co-financing from international sources especially the World Bank. In the course of three programmes - AIDS I (1994-1998), AIDS II (1998-2003) and AIDS III (2003-2007) - the World Bank committed some $365 million, matching a Brazilian Treasury contribution of $325 million. AIDS II with a total resource of $300 million is the largest of these programmes. Since the mid-1990s the UNESCO office in Brazil has grown in terms of funds managed - from some $4.5 million to $108.0 million in 2004, and in staff and activities. The overwhelming proportion of budgetary growth has come from 'extra-budgetary' resources. These are mainly Technical Cooperation agreements with the Brazilian government and with international bodies such as the World Bank. UNESCO was the 'implementing agency' along with UNODC for the AIDS II programme since its launch in 1998. In 2002, the Executive Board of UNESCO accepted a recommendation in an earlier evaluation of UNESCO programmes in Brazil2 that the AIDS II activities of UNESCO be evaluated. This evaluation was subsequently commissioned by the Brasilia office of UNESCO. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    297609

    Responses to AIDS challenges in Brazil: limits and possibilities. [Respuestas a los desafíos del SIDA en Brasil: límites y posibilidades]

    Castro MG; da Silva LB

    Brasilia, Brazil, UNESCO, 2005 Jun. 680 p.

    UNESCO and the National Program on STD/AIDS, of the Brazilian Ministry of Health, once again establish a partnership to carry out an activity, which records and cooperates towards implementing one of the most successful Brazilian public policies in health, worldwide acknowledged: those oriented to the fight against AIDS. This publication, basically addressed to tackle the dynamics of those agencies participating in AIDS-related governance in Brazil, lists and itemizes practices and representations of collective civil society units, at different territories. Furthermore, it records contemporaneous debates, assessments, criticisms and suggestions, aiming at adjusting the path. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    282114

    The contemporary response of the Brazilian government, the civil society and UNESCO to the HIV / AIDS epidemic. CCO Meeting, New York, New York, October 2003. [Respuesta contemporánea del gobierno brasileño, la sociedad civil y la UNESCO a la epidemia de VIH/SIDA. Reunión del Comité de Organizaciones Copatrocinadoras, Nueva York, Nueva York, octubre de 2003]

    UNESCO

    Brasilia, Brazil, UNESCO / Brazil, 2004. [10] p. (BR/2004/PI/H/1)

    Brazil has handled HIV/AIDS problems with much innovation and effectiveness, thereby creating good practices that other countries can learn from. As a universal organization, with a mandate encompassing the whole world, UNESCO must seek solutions wherever it can. Today, preventive education to fight HIV/AIDS is at the top of its agenda. Hence we must draw lessons from Brazil's experience so that your example can save lives and help development elsewhere: in Latin America, in Asia, in Africa, in Europe. We must learn from Brazil. We must learn fast. And we must apply what we learn quickly and effectively. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    145297

    NGO Standing Committee at UNESCO. Contribution, Habitat II - City Summit.

    NGO Standing Committee at UNESCO

    Paris, France, NGO Standing Committee at UNESCO, [1996]. [4] p.

    This paper summarizes the contributions and the 15 propositions of the Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) Standing Committee at UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for the Habitat II-City Summit. It also includes the international NGO seminar at UNESCO on "City Dweller, Citizen" held on March 1996. In accordance with its ethical mission, UNESCO has oriented its action for the Habitat II towards the themes of solidarity and of citizenship in the spirit of peace and of conservation of the environment. The Permanent Committee of NGOs accredited to UNESCO, elected by the Conference of the 585 NGOs having official relationships with UNESCO, is deeply involved in the programs and research undertaken by UNESCO.
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  6. 6
    140212

    Further promotion and encouragement of human rights and fundamental freedoms, including the question of the programme and methods of work of the commission. Alternative approaches and ways and means within the United Nations system for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms. Report of the Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences. Addendum [2]: Report on the mission of the Special Rapporteur to Brazil on the issue of domestic violence (15-26 July 1996).

    Coomaraswamy R

    [Unpublished] 1997 Jan 21 28 p. (E/CN.4/1997/47/Add.2)

    This document reprints the report of a July 1996 visit to Brazil of the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women to conduct an in-depth study of the issue of domestic violence. The introduction notes that this report is a case study meant to complement a previous report on violence against women in the family and that the investigation was conducted at the invitation of the Brazilian government. The first part of the report presents three case histories of women victims of domestic violence. The second session sketches the nature of the problem, and the third section describes the existing international, regional, and national legislative framework dealing with domestic violence. Section 4 describes the role of the police in combating domestic violence and their importance as the first refuge sought by women victims as well as issues pertinent to the existence since 1985 of women's police stations. The fifth section reviews pertinent health policy and notes the shortage of shelters for battered women. Section 6 provides an overview of how the judicial, legislative, and executive branches of government have responded to the problem, and the seventh section discusses actions taken by nongovernmental organizations and women's groups. The final section contains conclusions and specific recommendations for appropriate actions at the international, regional, national, and local levels.
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  7. 7
    128792

    First International Congress on Population Education and Development.

    In: First International Congress on Population Education and Development, Istanbul, Turkey, 14-17 April, 1993. Action Framework for Population Education on the Eve of the Twenty-First Century. Istanbul declaration, [compiled by] United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA] [and] UNESCO. [New York, New York], UNFPA, 1993. 3-4.

    Resolution 5.3, adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO at its 26th session in 1991, authorized the Director-General to organize, jointly with the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), the first International Congress on Population Education and Development (ICPED). Congress aims were to review trends in population education worldwide over the past 2 decades, to adopt a declaration upon the role of population education in human development, and to devise an action framework in the field. The congress was also held to strengthen the integration of population education into formal and non-formal education systems. At the invitation of the Turkish government, the congress was held in Istanbul during April 14-17, 1993, during which 93 countries were represented and 245 participants attended, including 20 ministers of education and 5 deputy ministers. The 27th session of the General Conference of UNESCO in Paris during October-November 1993 welcomed the conclusions of the first ICPED and endorsed its declaration. Member states, nongovernmental organizations, and governmental agencies are encouraged to implement the principles and activities suggested in the declaration and action framework.
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