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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    312818

    Gender, human rights and socioeconomic impact of AIDS in Brazil.

    de Oliveira RM

    Revista de Saude Publica / Journal of Public Health. 2006 Apr; 40 Suppl:80-87.

    The paper critically analyzes, from the gender standpoint, official results presented in the Brazilian government report to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/ AIDS (UNAIDS). Specifically, the fulfillment of 2003 targets set forth in the United Nations Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, under the category of Human Rights and Reduction of the Economic and Social Impact of AIDS, are evaluated. Key concepts are highlighted, including indicators and strategies that may help civilian society better monitor these targets until 2010. (author's)
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  2. 2
    182035

    Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore Cluster Country Consultation on Migrant Workers' HIV Vulnerability Reduction: Pre-Departure, Post-Arrival and Returnee Reintegration, 15-17 April 2002, Makati City, Philippines.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. South East Asia HIV and Development Programme

    Bangkok, Thailand, UNDP, South East Asia HIV and Development Programme, 2002 Sep. iv, 39 p.

    HIV/AIDS touches all sectors of society. It is an issue that requires appropriate responses at national, regional and global levels. Migrant workers are valuable resources that stimulate economic prosperity and contribute to the socio-economic development of Asia. Millions of migrant workers move in and out of the countries of Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines and Singapore (BIMPS) for economic and other reasons. Migrant workers, Non-Governmental Organizations, United Nations agencies and government officials responsible for migrant workers gathered from the BIMPS cluster countries to share their existing responses and to formulate collaborative actions for reducing migrant workers’ HIV vulnerabilities in this region and beyond. The delegates proposed a Memorandum of Understanding and drafted a set of collaborative responses. Only through the collective protection of valuable human resources will the BIMPS countries be able to mitigate the socio-economic and human impact of HIV/AIDS within each of their own countries. It is the hope of the UNDP South East Asia HIV and Development Programme that the resulting draft Memorandum of Understanding and the Joint Action Programme from the BIMPS Consultation will be considered by the Ministries of Labour, as well as the National AIDS Authorities of these countries in their future policy and programme elaborations. It is also hoped that the ASEAN Task Force on AIDS Secretariat and its dialogue partners will provide the necessary financial and technical support to materialize the proposed Joint Action Programme for the BIMPS sub-region. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    140545
    Peer Reviewed

    Social, cultural and technological determinants of maternal and neonatal health.

    Faundes A; Cecatti JG

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 1998 Dec; 63 Suppl 1:S1-2.

    This editorial introduces an issue of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics that publishes the proceedings of the International Association for Maternal and Neonatal Health's (IAMANEH) 1997 conference. The editorial opens by describing IAMANEH as a non-profit nongovernmental organization (NGO) created in 1977 to improve maternal and neonatal health worldwide. IAMANEH is a federation of approximately 36 national societies and is different from other international associations in this area because it clearly prioritizes developing countries and is based in NGOs. IAMANEH conferences are distinguished by the fact that they are organized to draw attention to a specific theme; for 1997, this was the social, cultural, and technological determinants of maternal and neonatal health. The proceedings of this conference deal with the maternal/neonatal health determinants of violence, the appropriate use of technology, abortion, adolescence, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, the role of midwives, and the role of traditional birth attendants.
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  4. 4
    114863

    Review and appraisal of the World Population Plan of Action. 1994 report.

    United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. Population Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1995. ix, 149 p. (ST/ESA/SER.A/152)

    This UN review covers an appraisal of plans of action for the entire period of 1974-94, due to the expected new Plan of Action to be adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development scheduled for 1994 in Cairo. Plans of action were adopted at Bucharest in 1974 and in Mexico city in 1984. Reviews of plan implementation were conducted in 1979, 1984, and 1989. This review covers the major topics of the Plan of Action and follows the structure of the Program of Action of the 1994 Conference. Chapters 1-9 and 15 focus on socioeconomic development and population, women, the family, population growth and demographic structure, human reproduction, mortality, population distribution, and internal and international migration. Chapters 10 and 11 focus on information, education, and communication, data collection and analyses, research, provision of services, management of program operation, creation of awareness, and evaluation of actions. Chapters 12-14 focus on government, the international community, nongovernmental organizations, scholars, the private sector, and the media. Each topic is presented with a discussion of the following issues: trends, salient issues, significance of issues, actions considered by the Plan of Action, government measures, measures taken by the international community, and an assessment of the implementation of the Plan of Action. The World Population Plan of Action presents principles and objectives that justify action on population issues, guide criteria, and determine the expected results of action. The Plan rejects any form of coercion. Couples and individuals have the basic right to decide freely and responsibly the number and spacing of their children; have responsibility for taking into account the needs of their living and future children; and have responsibilities toward the community.
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  5. 5
    084436

    Secondary research review for Venezuela.

    Cisek C

    [Unpublished] 1990 Oct. iii, 29 p.

    This summary provides key background information for the design and development of a contraceptive social marketing (CSM) project in Venezuela. The country situation is described by providing a map; graphs illustrating population growth, age structure, total fertility rate, and infant mortality rate; the demographic characteristics of the population; the social situation; and leading economic indicators and factors. The population/family planning (FP) environment is then described in terms of the national population policy and goals, the legal and regulatory environment, the media, other international donor agencies and nongovernmental organizations active in the field of population, and the commercial contraceptive market. Available data are then presented on contraceptive usage by methods, the most available methods in the country, discontinuation, abortion, maternal age, needs, desired family size, and contraceptive awareness. The summary lists the following implications for project design from the point of view of the consumer: 1) the most recent data (1977) indicated an unmet need for FP, but more recent data must be obtained to access current demand; 2) more data are needed on the benefits and barriers to oral contraceptive and condom use; 3) data are needed on current use rates, sources of supply, and knowledge of correct use of oral contraceptives (OCs); 4) a significant target population exists for OCs and condoms; 5) marketing strategies should influence women to use modern contraceptives instead of abortion to limit family size. Project implications resulting from the market situation are that 1) despite the fact that commercial distribution networks within urban centers (83% of the population) are well-developed, contraceptives are not widely available at the retail level and are expensive; 2) obstacles to the commercial contraceptive industry exist at the importer, retailer, and consumer levels; and 3) most homes have radios and televisions, but all advertising must be government-approved, and the government has never approved contraceptive advertising. Appended to this document are charts showing 1) fertility rates by region, 2) urban and rural population growth, 3) an analysis of the urban population, 4) the incidence of abortion among current contraceptive users, 5) an analysis of the female population of reproductive age, 6) the age breakdown of women who desire no more children, 7) the contraceptive method used by women who desire no more children, and 8) desired family size.
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