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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    328894

    Achieving the millennium development goals in Bangladesh [editorial]

    Sack DA

    Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition. 2008 Sep; 26(3):251-2.

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  2. 2
    282414

    How adjustment programs can help the poor.The World Bank's experience.

    Ribe H; Carvalho S; Liebenthal R; Nicholas P; Zuckerman E

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1990. 49 p. (World Bank Discussion Papers No. 71)

    Little is known about the overall impact of adjustment programs on poverty. To a large extent, this is because it is difficult to distinguish the effects of externally induced recession from the effects of the policies and programs designed to offset them. Nevertheless, one clear lesson from experience has been that an orderly adjustment process designed to establish a new equilibrium growth path is indispensable for improving the longer-term position of the poor. Some adjustment measures can affect the poor adversely. This adverse impact may result from reductions in public expenditures, increases in prices of goods and services consumed by the poor, and declines in employment or real wages in sectors in which they work. Appropriate social and economic measures can help to reduce the adverse impact on the poor and create opportunities for stronger poverty reduction in the future. The most common way of addressing the adverse impact of adjustment has been the implementation of targeted compensatory programs. Such programs can compensate those affected directly by adjustment (for example laid-off public sector employees) or provide temporary employment of relief to the chronically poor. But these programs have often been too complex and have faced serious shortcomings such as insufficient political commitment, institutional weaknesses, shortages of funding and poorly trained staff. Greater attention should be given in the future to identifying the most appropriate interventions as well as to their design and implementation. Changes in the design of adjustment programs can promote the longer-run interests of the poor, but have received relatively little attention. Appropriate design changes can help to foster pro-poor growth by, for example, removing biases that favor capital-intensive production or other impediments to employment growth. They can also enable reallocations of public expenditures in ways that support, or improve the efficiency of, programs that help the poor to take advantage of the emerging economic opportunities (by developing skills or providing the necessary complementary infrastructure). Finally, appropriate design changes can help mitigate the possible adverse impact on the poor, for example, by targeting subsidies more effectively. Subsidies that have a large impact on the income of the poor (even if only a small proportion of the subsidy reaches them), should not be reduced or eliminated unless alternative means of reaching the poor are introduced. (author's)
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  3. 3
    295381
    Peer Reviewed

    Report of a pre ICN workshop on Negotiating the Future of Nutrition, Johannesburg, South Africa, 18 September 2005.

    Yach D; Eloff T; Vorster HH; Margetts BM

    Public Health Nutrition. 2005 Dec; 8(8):1229-1230.

    Good nutrition underpins good health. That reality has been shown in repeated studies and quantified most recently in the 2002 World Health Report of the World Health Organization (WHO). In that report, food and nutrition (their lack or over-consumption) accounted for considerable mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despite the compelling evidence of need, global action remains inadequate. Nutrition and food policy still receives considerably less attention in health policy and funding arenas than do many other lesser contributors to human health. Part of the reason relates to the lack of a strong coordinated voice for the broad area that is inclusive of all committed to and able to influence policies and actions for populations. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    276613

    Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance Project assessment.

    Copeland R; Frankenberger T; Kennedy E

    Washington, D.C., LTG Associates, Monitoring, Evaluation and Design Support Project, 2002 Mar. [67] p. (PD-ABW-468; USAID Contract No. HRN-I-00-99-00002-00)

    The Nutrition Results Package is a ten-year program framework authorized in 1998. Under this authorization, The Food and Nutrition Technical Assistance (FANTA) project was awarded competitively in September 1998 to the Academy for Educational Development (AED) as the prime contractor, with Cornell University and Tufts University as subcontractors. The FANTA proposal included a memorandum of understanding with Food Aid Management (FAM), a consortium of Private Voluntary Organizations (PVOs), referred to as Cooperating Sponsors (CS), implementing Title II food aid development and emergency programs. The overall purpose of FANTA is "improved food and nutrition policy, strategy, and program development". Three Intermediate Results (IRs) were identified to achieve this purpose: USAID's and Cooperating Sponsors' nutrition and food security-related program development, analysis, monitoring, and evaluation improved, USAID, host country governments, and Cooperating Sponsors establish improved, integrated nutrition and food security-related strategies and policies, and Best practices and acceptable standards in nutrition and food security-related policy and programming adopted by USAID, Cooperating Sponsors, and other key stakeholders. (excerpt)
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