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Your search found 17 Results

  1. 1
    188598

    Sport for development and peace: towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Report from the United Nations Inter-Agency Task Force on Sport for Development and Peace.

    United Nations. Inter-Agency Task Force on Sport for Development and Peace

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2003. vi, 36 p.

    This report analyses in detail the potential contribution that sport can make towards achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It provides an overview of the growing role that sports activities are playing in many United Nations programmes and crystallizes the lessons learned. It also includes recommendations aimed at maximizing and mainstreaming the use of sport. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    187530
    Peer Reviewed

    FIGO and women's health 2000 - 2003.

    Sheth SS

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2003 Sep; 82(3):357-367.

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics – FIGO – has been striving hard to carefully attend to women’s well-being, and respect and implement their rights, the status and their health, which is well beyond the basic obstetric and gynecological requirement. FIGO is deeply involved in acting as a catalyst for the all-round activities of national obstetric and gynecologic societies to mobilise their members to participate in and contribute to, all of their endeavours. FIGO’s committees strengthen these objectives and FIGO’s alliance with WHO provides a springboard. The task is gigantic, but FIGO, through national obstetric and gynecological societies and with the strength of obstetricians and gynecologists as its battalion, can offer to combat and meet the demands. (author's)
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  3. 3
    181873

    Arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh: a geographic analysis.

    Paul BK; De S

    Journal of the American Water Resources Association. 2000 Aug; 36(4):799-809.

    Drinking of arsenic-contaminated tubewell water has become a serious health threat in Bangladesh. Arsenic contaminated tubewells are believed to be responsible for poisoning nearly two-thirds of this country's population. If proper actions are not taken immediately, many people in Bangladesh will die from arsenic poisoning in just a few years. Causes and consequences of arsenic poisoning, the extent of area affected by it, and local knowledge and beliefs about the arsenic problem - including solutions and international responses to the problem - are analyzed. Although no one knows precisely how the arsenic is released into the ground water, several contradictory theories exist to account for its release. Initial symptoms of the poisoning consist of a dryness and throat constriction, difficulty in swallowing, and acute epigastric pain. Long-term exposure leads to skin, lung, or bladder cancer. Both government and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in Bangladesh, foreign governments, and international agencies are now involved in mitigating the effects of the arsenic poisoning, as well as developing cost-effective remedial measures that are affordable by the rural people. (author's)
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  4. 4
    102037

    Delegates' guide to recent publications for the International Conference on Population and Development.

    Cooperating Agencies Working Group on Materials Development and Media Activities

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 1994. [6], 75 p.

    The chapters of this listing of recent publications correspond to the chapters in the Draft Programme of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Thus, publications are grouped under the headings: 1) interrelationships between population, sustained economic growth, and sustainable development; 2) gender equality, equity, and empowerment of women; 3) the family and its roles, composition, and structure; 4) population growth and structure; 5) reproductive rights, sexual and reproductive health, and family planning; 6) health, morbidity, and mortality; 7) population distribution, urbanization, and internal migration; 8) international migration; 9) population, development, and education; 10) technology, research, and development; 11) national action; 12) international cooperation; and 13) partnership with the nongovernmental sector. There are no entries that correspond to the Programme of Action chapters which present the Preamble, Principles, or Follow-up to the Conference. More than 40 organizations listed publications in this guide and agreed to provide copies free of charge to official ICPD delegates as long as supplies last. A full list of organization names, contact persons, addresses, and telephone and fax numbers is also given.
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  5. 5
    099397

    The International Conference on Population and Development, September 5-13, 1994, Cairo, Egypt. Nepal's country report.

    Nepal. National Planning Commission

    Kathmandu, Nepal, National Planning Commission, 1993 Sep. vi, 49 p.

    Prepared for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, this country report from Nepal opens with a description of the geographic features and administrative regions, zones, and districts of the country. 91% of the population of Nepal is rural, and agriculture accounts for 57% of the gross domestic product. Nepal has made some socioeconomic gains from 1961 to 1991 which are reflected in improved life expectancy (from 34 to 54.4 years), a decline in the infant mortality rate (from 200 to 102), and an improvement in the literacy rate (from 9 to > 40%). However, the per capital income of US $180 and rapid population growth have impeded improvement in the standard of living. The new government of Nepal is committed to establishing a better balance between population and the environment. This report provides a discussion of population growth and structure; population distribution, urbanization, and migration; the environment and sustainable development; the status of women; population policies and programs (highlighting the population policy of the plan for 1992-97); the national family planning program and health programs; and intervention issues. A 15-point summary is provided, and details of the objectives, priorities, and major policy thrust in regard to population and development of the Eight Plan (1992-97) are appended.
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  6. 6
    170429

    2001 annual review. Partnership in practice. [Informe anual 2001. Asociaciones en la práctica]

    Healthlink Worldwide

    London, England, Healthlink Worldwide, 2001. [7] p.

    This 2001 Annual Review of the Healthlink Worldwide considers how the Communicating through Partnership model has been worked out in practice. It includes details of projects being carried out with partners in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Healthlink Worldwide is a UK-based health and disability nongovernmental organization that works with partner organizations worldwide to improve the health of poor and vulnerable communities.
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  7. 7
    140382

    The situation analysis of mothers and children in Turkey.

    UNICEF; Turkey. Ministry of Health

    Ankara, Turkey, UNICEF, 1991 Apr. xxxv, 405 p. (Country Programme, 1991-1995 Series No. 2)

    This report is the synthesis and analysis of data from the interventions for the improvement of the health situation of mothers and children in Turkey. It also identifies areas where mother and child related problems are concentrated. The document is organized into six parts. Part I discusses the state of children and the development connection. Part II presents the country profile of Turkey. Part III is the core of the document and discusses relevant issues on maternal and child health and presents the analysis of the different sectors that affect children. Part III also establishes the correlation between literacy rates in the provinces, average life expectancy and per capita income. Part IV presents the analysis of the profile of development and disparities by regions. Part V briefly reviews the Government of Turkey-UN Children's Fund cooperation with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and summarizes priority subjects from the Situation Analysis Report. Reviewed under the chapters of NGOs are the functions and potential of the NGOs with respect to the women and the child. Part VI focuses on the major problems which underline all the other concrete problems related to the quality of the mother s and children's life.
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  8. 8
    145288

    Women's caucus advocacy chart.

    Women's Environment and Development Organization [WEDO]

    New York, New York, WEDO, 1996 Jun 1. 17 p.

    This Advocacy Chart complements the Women's Caucus line-by-line Recommendations on Bracketed Text offered to all government and nongovernment delegates from the Women's Caucus. With over one-half of Habitat Agenda in bracket, the Women's Caucus is focusing its advocacy efforts on ensuring positive outcomes from a gender perspective on the outstanding issues be negotiated by delegates. This chart clusters the various brackets under the following headings: Gender Equality, Human Rights, Economics, Environment and Sustainable Human Settlements, Health, Peace, and Implementation and Finance. Previously agreed UN language, which supports their position of retaining or amending much of what is in brackets, is also presented. It is hoped that this chart will be useful in their efforts to ensure that all the hard-won achievements of the global women's movements at previous UN conferences be reaffirmed and promoted.
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  9. 9
    139682

    The power of partnership in health promotion.

    O'Byrne D

    PROMOTION & EDUCATION. 1998; 5(3-4):7-8.

    In May 1998, the World Health Assembly adopted a new Health for All in the 21st Century policy document which states that Health for All is a vision which recognizes the oneness of humanity and that a need exists to promote health and alleviate morbidity and suffering universally and in a spirit of solidarity. Health promotion can play a major role in achieving this vision. Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland, the incoming Director-General of the WHO, has stressed her intention to place health high on the political agenda, and recognizes the importance of civil society and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in effecting positive change. The Fourth International Conference on Health Promotion was the first such conference to be held in a developing country. Conference participants were drawn from many sectors of society and included senior public health officials, health promoters, intergovernmental agencies, foundations, civil society, NGOs, and cooperatives. The private sector also supported the promotion of health. The Jakarta Declaration identifies the following priorities for health promotion in the 21st century: the promotion of social responsibility for health, increasing investment in health development, consolidating and expanding partnerships for health, increasing community capacity and empowering the individual, and securing an infrastructure for health promotion. The World Health Assembly resolution of May 1998 on health promotion confirmed the priorities of the Jakarta Declaration on health promotion and urged all member states of the WHO to respond accordingly. NGOs have already risen to the challenge of the declaration.
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  10. 10
    129910

    European Population Conference. Proceedings. Volume 2. 23-26 March 1993, Geneva, Switzerland. Conference Europeenne sur la Population. Actes. Volume 2. 23-26 mars 1993, Geneve, Suisse.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Europe; Council of Europe; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1994. 429 p.

    This volume contains country statements and statements by international and nongovernmental organizations for the 1993 European Population Conference that was jointly organized by the UN Economic Commission for Europe (ECC), the Council of Europe (CE), and the UN Population Fund (UNFPA). The conference aimed to review, examine, and analyze key population-related issues in the region's countries, to evaluate the implementation of population-related policies, and to prepare a set of recommendations on key population-related issues and policies. The five conference priorities were international migration, fertility and the family, health and mortality, population growth and age structure, and international cooperation in the field of population. Conference attendants included representatives from European countries, Argentina, Australia, Egypt, the Holy See, Japan, New Zealand, UN agencies, and 61 nongovernmental organizations. European countries and the world face the challenges of population growth, population impact on the environment, unsustainable modes of production and consumption, and human survival. Countries are inextricably linked, and international cooperation and solidarity are necessary. Developing countries, with the highest rates of population growth, are faced with generating adequate levels of sustainable economic and social development and with devoting sufficient resources to enable demographic transition. Europe's challenges include international migration and continuation of support in development and population programs for countries undergoing political and economic transition. Old national and ethnic rivalries have surfaced and now facilitate armed conflicts and serious political crises. Changes have occurred in fertility, the status of women, and the family. AIDS and drug abuse are causes for concern. This volume identifies 15 recommendations.
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  11. 11
    128721

    Addressing gender and health issues in NGO programmes.

    Ravindran TK

    In: Gender and women's health. Part 2. Linking gender and women's health conceptually, [compiled by] Asian-Pacific Resource and Research Centre for Women [ARROW]. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, ARROW, 1997. 9-12. (Information Package No. 2)

    Grassroots, gender-sensitive health interventions should begin from women's self-assessment of needs, build on women's knowledge and skills, seek to redress gender-based discrimination or dependency, and contribute to women's ability to organize. Before donor agencies raise gender issues in health with local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), the donor agencies should determine 1) if the NGO is gender-aware and committed to gender and development work, 2) if the NGO decision-makers support gender work, 3) if gender issues are the responsibility of a lead person or a team and whether men are involved, and 4) if the NGO supports women's empowerment in its own office. NGO partners may face practical and ideological constraints in introducing gender issues, and ideological resistance may be hardest to overcome. The following questions can be used to assess the gender sensitivity of health projects: 1) what are women's gender-specific health needs in the program area, 2) do girls receive differential treatment in the project area, 3) how does the project affect existing time constraints faced by women, 4) has the project identified the informal methods used by women, 5) does the project recognize that women are not a homogenous group, 6) does the project address barriers women face in assessing facilities and services, 7) what is the quality of care provided, 8) will the project increase women's decision-making involvement, 9) will the project increase women's ability to organize, 10) will the project improve women's access to and control over services and infrastructural facilities, and 11) what impact will the project have on gender relations.
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  12. 12
    121888

    Programme of Action adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994.

    International Conference on Population and Development [ICPD] (1994: Cairo)

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1996. viii, 166 p.

    This document is a pocket edition of the Programme of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Part 1 of the booklet contains the text of the Programme of Action. Chapter 1 contains the Preamble, and chapter 2 describes the principles upon which the Programme of Action is based. For each of the major headings in the remaining 14 chapters, the basis of action, objectives, and specific actions are presented. Chapter 3 covers the interrelationships between population, sustained economic growth, and sustainable development. Chapter 4 deals with gender equality, equity, and the empowerment of women. The fifth chapter looks at the roles, rights, composition, and structure of the family, and chapter 6 is concerned with population growth and structure. Chapter 7 discusses issues related to reproductive rights and reproductive health, while chapter 8 concentrates on health, morbidity, and mortality. The ninth chapter is devoted to population distribution, urbanization, and internal migration, and chapter 10 focuses on international migration. The relationship of population, development, and education is considered in chapter 11, and research issues are included in chapter 12. Chapters 13-15 relay what is needed in the areas of national action, international cooperation, and partnerships with the nongovernmental sector, respectively, and the final chapter reviews the necessary national, regional, and international follow-up activities. Part 2 of the booklet reproduces the oral and written statements and reservations about the Programme of Action submitted by various countries.
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  13. 13
    119778

    Education international: an alliance with WHO.

    van Leeuwen F

    WORLD HEALTH. 1996 Jul-Aug; 49(4):27.

    Teaching children and adolescents how to become responsible citizens should be at the heart of schools' educational mission. Students must be made aware of the major problems, especially the health problems, they will face during the course of their lives. Health education involves conveying knowledge and influencing or changing attitudes and behavior in the context of daily life. It also means making young people responsible for their own health. Since young people's health directly affects their training, school attendance, and academic achievement, comprehensive health programs must be developed in the school setting. Such programs are among the most cost-effective investments a nation can make to improve its health. The yield can be measured in long-term economic and social development and the well-being of the whole population. Education International is an organization of teachers and other educational workers created in 1993 with affiliates in 140 countries. The organization is currently developing many promising partnerships. Education International particularly values its partnership with the World Health Organization.
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  14. 14
    114863

    Review and appraisal of the World Population Plan of Action. 1994 report.

    United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. Population Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1995. ix, 149 p. (ST/ESA/SER.A/152)

    This UN review covers an appraisal of plans of action for the entire period of 1974-94, due to the expected new Plan of Action to be adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development scheduled for 1994 in Cairo. Plans of action were adopted at Bucharest in 1974 and in Mexico city in 1984. Reviews of plan implementation were conducted in 1979, 1984, and 1989. This review covers the major topics of the Plan of Action and follows the structure of the Program of Action of the 1994 Conference. Chapters 1-9 and 15 focus on socioeconomic development and population, women, the family, population growth and demographic structure, human reproduction, mortality, population distribution, and internal and international migration. Chapters 10 and 11 focus on information, education, and communication, data collection and analyses, research, provision of services, management of program operation, creation of awareness, and evaluation of actions. Chapters 12-14 focus on government, the international community, nongovernmental organizations, scholars, the private sector, and the media. Each topic is presented with a discussion of the following issues: trends, salient issues, significance of issues, actions considered by the Plan of Action, government measures, measures taken by the international community, and an assessment of the implementation of the Plan of Action. The World Population Plan of Action presents principles and objectives that justify action on population issues, guide criteria, and determine the expected results of action. The Plan rejects any form of coercion. Couples and individuals have the basic right to decide freely and responsibly the number and spacing of their children; have responsibility for taking into account the needs of their living and future children; and have responsibilities toward the community.
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  15. 15
    113298

    The fourth World Conference on Women: a conference of women on the world.

    Gottschalk J

    MMS AND THE UN. UPDATES ON COLLABORATION WITH AND PARTICIPATION AT THE UNITED NATIONS. 1995 Oct; 1-8.

    This report provides commentary on some of main features of the Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing and the Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) Forum. Despite considerable obstacles from China, poor housing accommodations, and bad weather, nearly 50,000 men and women attended the conference on women. There were 6000 delegates who represented 189 nations, 4030 NGO representatives, and 3245 media representatives. The 1994 women's conference was one of a series of UN conferences (children, human rights, population and development, and social development) held since 1990 on the most urgent social issues. The themes of the women's conference were equality, development, and peace, which were further subdivided into 12 areas. Some of the 12 areas pertained generally to inequalities in access to training, education, health care, inequalities in economic structures, inequalities between men and women in power sharing and decision making, and gender inequalities in management of natural resources and in the media. There was concern for women's poverty, domestic violence, wars' impact on women and children, the advancement of women, stereotyping of women, discrimination against and violation of the rights of the girl child, and lack of respect for and protection of women's human rights. Accredited NGO participation included roles as monitors and active lobbyists, which was an unprecedented accomplishment. In prior years, NGOs wielded influence through increasingly sophisticated analyses, organization, lobbying strategies, and networking before, during, and after conferences. NGOs at the women's conference effectively organized themselves into teams with a principal focus in order to maximize impact in the complicated process of plenary sessions, main committee meetings, and informal meetings. Many new networks were formed that hold the hope of the development of one world based on peace and justice for all and protection of a fragile ecosystem. The author briefly discusses human rights, inheritance, armed conflict, girls and adolescents, poverty, the environment, and health.
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  16. 16
    108748

    Population and development. Volume 1. Programme of Action adopted at the International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994.

    United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis

    In: International migration policies and the status of female migrants. Proceedings of the United Nations Expert Group Meeting on International Migration Policies and the Status of Female Migrants, San Miniato, Italy, 28-31 March 1990, compiled by United Nations. Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. Population division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1995. vii, 100 p. (ST/ESA/SER.A/149)

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) was held in Cairo, Egypt, during September 5-13, 1994. It was the fifth population conference organized under the auspices of the UN. A general debate was held at the ICPD on population and related issues, and their implications for social and economic development, with a program of action ultimately adopted by consensus to guide national and international action on population and development over the next 20 years. This document contains the program of action as well as the oral and written statements and reservations on the program. The program is divided into the following chapters: the preamble; principles; interrelationships between population, sustained economic growth, and sustainable development; gender equality, equity, and the empowerment of women; the family, its roles, rights, composition, and structure; population growth and structure; reproductive rights and reproductive health; health, morbidity, and mortality; population distribution, urbanization, and internal migration; international migration; population, development, and education; technology, research, and development; national action; international cooperation; partnership with the non-governmental sector; and follow-up to the conference.
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  17. 17
    099406

    Country report: Bangladesh. International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994.

    Bangladesh

    [Unpublished] 1994. iv, 45 p.

    The country report prepared by Bangladesh for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development begins by highlighting the achievements of the family planning (FP)/maternal-child health (MCH) program. Political commitment, international support, the involvement of women, and integrated efforts have led to a decline in the population growth rate from 3 to 2.07% (1971-91), a decline in total fertility rate from 7.5 to 4.0% (1974-91), a reduction in desired family size from 4.1 to 2.9 (1975-89), a decline in infant mortality from 150 to 88/1000 (1975-92), and a decline in the under age 5 years mortality from 24 to 19/1000 (1982-90). In addition, the contraceptive prevalence rate has increased from 7 to 40% (1974-91). The government is now addressing the following concerns: 1) the dependence of the FP and health programs on external resources; 2) improving access to and quality of FP and health services; 3) promoting a demand for FP and involving men in FP and MCH; and 4) achieving social and economic development through economic overhaul and by improving education and the status of women and children. The country report presents the demographic context by giving a profile of the population and by discussing mortality, migration, and future growth and population size. The population policy, planning, and program framework is described through information on national perceptions of population issues, the evolution and current status of the population policy (which is presented), the role of population in development planning, and a profile of the national population program (reproductive health issues; MCH and FP services; information, education, and communication; research methodology; the environment, aging, adolescents and youth, multi-sectoral activities, women's status; the health of women and girls; women's education and role in industry and agriculture, and public interventions for women). The description of the operational aspects of population and family planning (FP) program implementation includes political and national support, the national implementation strategy, evaluation, finances and resources, and the role of the World Population Plan of Action. The discussion of the national plan for the future involves emerging and priority concerns, the policy framework, programmatic activities, resource mobilization, and regional and global cooperation.
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