Your search found 141 Results

  1. 1
    334314

    Resolution adopted by the General Assembly. 66/288. The future we want.

    United Nations. General Assembly

    [Unpublished] 2012 Sep 11. [53] p. (A/RES/66/288)

    Recalling its resolution 64/236 of 24 December 2009, in which it decided to organize, in 2012, the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development at the highest possible level, as well as its resolution 66/197 of 22 December 2011, 1. Expresses its profound gratitude to the Government and the people of Brazil for hosting the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro from 20 to 22 June 2012, and for providing all the necessary support; 2. Endorses the outcome document of the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, entitled “The future we want”, annexed to the present resolution. (Excerpt)
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  2. 2
    334313

    Rio+20. United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 20-22 June 2012. Agenda item 10. Outcome of the conference. The future we want.

    United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (2012: Rio de Janeiro)

    [Unpublished] 2012 Jun 19. [53] p. (A/CONF.216/L.1)

    We, the Heads of State and Government and high-level representatives, having met at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 20 to 22 June 2012, with the full participation of civil society, renew our commitment to sustainable development and to ensuring the promotion of an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable future for our planet and for present and future generations. (Excerpt)
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  3. 3
    333075

    Towards a green economy: Pathways to sustainable development and poverty eradication. A synthesis for policy makers.

    United Nations Environment Program [UNEP]

    Nairobi, Kenya, UNEP, 2011. [52] p.

    We argue in UNEP's forthcoming Green Economy Report, and in this extracted Synthesis for Policy Makers, that the rewards of greening the world's economies are tangible and considerable, that the means are at hand for both governments and the private sector, and that the time to engage the challenge is now. In this report, we explored through a macroeconomic model the impacts of investments in greening the economy as against investments in "business as usual" -- measuring results not only in terms of traditional GDP but also impacts on employment, resource intensity, emissions and ecological impact. We estimated, based on several studies, that the annual financing demand to green the global economy was in the range of US$ 1.05-2.59 trillion. To place this demand in perspective, it is less than one-tenth of the total global investment per year (as measured by global Gross Capital Formation). Taking an annual level of US$ 1.3 trillion (i.e. 2% of global GDP) as a target reallocation from "brown" investment to "green" investment, our macroeconomic model suggests that over time, investing in a green economy enhances long-run economic performance and can increase total global wealth. Significantly, it does so while enhancing stocks of renewable resources, reducing environmental risks, and rebuilding our capacity to generate future prosperity. Our report, Towards a Green Economy, focuses on 10 key economic sectors because we see these sectors as driving the defining trends of the transition to a green economy, including increasing human well-being and social equity, and reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities. Across many of these sectors, we have found that greening the economy can generate consistent and positive outcomes for increased wealth, growth in economic output, decent employment, and reduced poverty. (Excerpts)
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  4. 4
    296483

    From silent spring to vocal vanguard - women's role in the global environmental movement - includes related articles.

    UN Chronicle. 1997 Fall; 34(3):[9] p..

    Since 1962, when American author Rachel Carson alerted the world to the dangers of pesticide poisoning in her ground-breaking book "Silent Spring", women have played a vital role in the global environmental movement. In 1988, the World Commission on Environment and Development, headed by Norwegian Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland, published its report, "Our Common Future", linking the environmental crisis to unsustainable development and financial practices that were worsening the North-South gap, with women making up a majority of the world's poor and illiterate. The United Nations Development Programme has defined sustainable development as development that not only generates economic growth, but distributes its benefits equitably, that regenerates the environment rather than destroying it, and that empowers people rather than marginalizing them. It is development that gives priority to the poor, enlarging their choices and opportunities and providing for their participation in decisions that affect their lives. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    296465

    Natural resources committee calls for global water plan - UN Committee on Natural Resources second session, Feb 22-Mar 4, 1994 addresses water management and sustenance if mineral resources.

    UN Chronicle. 1994 Jun; 31(2):[2] p..

    A worldwide plan to avert an impending global water crisis was called for by the Committee on Natural Resources at its second session (22 February-4 March, New York). The strategy should define specific areas of priority to diminish significantly by the year 2010 the threat to freshwater resources, the 24-member expert body said in asking the UN Commission on Sustainable Development to undertake that task. "Water shortages are becoming a common occurrence in industrialized and developing countries alike", stated a report examined by the Committee. "The world may be reaching a water crisis situation of global proportions." The Committee also asked Governments to establish a dynamic and multisectoral approach to water resources management, including assessing and protecting potential sources of freshwater. As for mineral resources--another major concern--the Committee wanted the Commission to forge a dialogue between the UN system and the international mining industry to develop new approaches to ensure a sustainable supply of mineral resources. Workshops on mineral resource assessment projects were recommended. A report was asked on key advances in state-of-the-art technologies to minimize environmental degradation resulting from mining and related processing. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    279254

    Food security through science.

    Harsch E

    Africa Recovery. 1999 Dec; 13(4):[6] p..

    To combat hunger and improve food security in their continent, Africans must make better use of science to overcome soil degradation, says Mr. Uzo Mokwunye, director of the UN's Institute for Natural Resources in Africa (INRA). "Farmers know that low soil fertility is a major problem, but nobody is doing anything about it," he said in an interview at the institute's headquarters at the University of Ghana, Legon, near Accra. According to UN studies, about 72 per cent of sub-Saharan Africa's cropland and 31 per cent of its pastureland is degraded, contributing to enormous losses in output. Meanwhile, 35 per cent of Africa's children are malnourished. If current trends continue, by 2025 the region will produce enough food for only 40 per cent of its projected 1 billion people. Thus far, most agricultural research is devoted to developing high-yielding seeds, Mr. Mokwunye notes. But, he adds, a green revolution "will be impossible in Africa" unless soil quality is improved so that these new varieties can thrive. With both high-yielding seeds and more fertile soil, rice and wheat yields could double, sorghum yields could triple and maize yields could quadruple. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    273387

    Population, environment and development. The concise report.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2001. vi, 60 p. (ST/ESA/SER.A/202)

    The present report has been prepared in response to Economic and Social Council resolution 1995/55 of 28 July 1995, in which the Council endorsed the terms of reference and the topic-oriented and prioritized multi-year work programme proposed by the Commission on Population and Development at its twenty-eighth session. According to the multi-year work programme, which was to serve as a framework for the assessment of the progress achieved in the implementation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, a new series of reports on a special set of the themes would be prepared annually. The Commission, in its decisions 1999/1 and 2000/1, decided that the special theme for the year 2001 should be population, environment and development, which is the topic of the present report. The general trends of rapid population growth, sustained but uneven economic improvement and environmental degradation are generally well accepted. However, how population size and growth, environmental change and development interact on each other is not well established. This report reviews what is known about these interrelationships. The report analyses recent information and policy perspectives on population, environment and development. The topics investigated in this report include: the evolution of population and the environment at major United Nations conferences; temporal trends in population, environment and development; government views and policies concerning population, environment and development; population size and growth, environment and development; migration, population change and the rural environment; health, mortality, fertility and the environment; and population, environment and development in urban settings. The presentation of these topics is followed by conclusions. Annex I deals with the availability and quality of data; and annex II deals with theories and frameworks for modelling the impact of population growth on the physical environment. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    186532
    Peer Reviewed

    Empowerment and disempowerment of forest women in Uttarakhand, India.

    Sarin M

    Gender, Technology and Development. 2001 Sep-Dec; 5(3):341-364.

    Empowering women of forest based societies to participate in local forest management has become an essential rhetorical commitment of donor funded 'participatory' forestry projects and state policies for devolution of forest management. Instead of increasing women's empowerment, the top-down interventions of a World Bank funded forestry project in Uttarakhand are doing the opposite by disrupting and marginalizing their own struggles and achievements, transferring power and authority to the forest department and local elite men. A number of case studies illustrate the project's insensitivity to the dynamic functioning of existing self-governing institutions and the women's ongoing struggles within them to gain greater voice and control over forest resources for improving their quality of life and livelihood security. The article argues for active engagement of forest women and their communities in the policy and project formulation process itself, which permits building upon women's and men's own initiatives and struggles while strengthening gender-equal democratization of self-governing community forestry institutions. (author's)
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  9. 9
    184564

    Population, resources and the environment: struggling towards sustainability.

    Hinrichsen D

    In: An agenda for people: the UNFPA through three decades, edited by Nafis Sadik. New York, New York, New York University Press, 2002. 175-188.

    This analysis looks at the United Nations Population Fund's (UNFPA's) work in the area of population-environment-development linkages. It then analyses the collective effects of 6 billion people, their consumption patterns, and resource use trends, in six different critical resource areas. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    180867

    Fornos says curbing growth is challenge for 'our generation'.

    Burdett H

    POPLINE. 2003 May-Jun; 25:1, 2.

    If we are serious about a more equitable balance between population, environment and resources, Fornos said, " the industrialized world must commit itself to the provision of the necessary population assistance to the developing world." He stressed that solving the problem of rapid population growth is "a burden sharing exercise, with all of us - governments, multilateral agencies, the private sector, non-governmental organizations - working together for the common goal of improving the human condition." Fornos pointed out that throughout the world forests are declining, topsoil is eroding, deserts are expanding, temperatures are rising, and there remains the constant threat of unprecedented food and water shortages. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    172549

    Optimum population and the search for sustainability.

    Wilcox MB

    SusPop News. 1995 Jan; (11):4-6.

    The author discusses two examples of the association between the concept of optimum population and sustainable development, and presents suggestions for the next UN conference on population.
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  12. 12
    083674
    Peer Reviewed

    [Health and environment: a global challenge] Sante et environnement: un defi mondial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Commission on Health and Environment

    BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1992; 70(5):567-72.

    WHO's Commission on Health and Environment states that a healthy environment is not only a necessity: the right to live and to work in an environment favorable to physical and mental health is recognized by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is for everyone to see to it that this right be respected. It is the duty of individuals and businesses to act and of public powers to supply a strategic and institutional framework necessary for action. Three major objectives can be defined at the global level: establish a sustainable base for health for all, assure a favorable environment for health (i.e., reduce physical, chemical, and biological risks and furnish all the means to acquire the necessary resources for health), and make all individuals and organizations aware of their responsibilities in regard to health and environmental conditions which are necessary to all. To achieve a sustainable base for all, it will be necessary to slow down and finally stop population growth as fast as possible and to promote ways of life and plans of consumption conforming to requirements of ecological sustainability in developed countries. Two principles are at the center of all actions aiming to guarantee a healthier and more stable environment: more equitable access to resources between individuals on the national level and between countries, and full participation of citizens in planning. Participation contributes to the promotion of health and the quality of the environment because it serves as a means to organize action and to motivate individuals and communities while allowing them to work out policies and projects based on their own priorities. It also allows individuals to influence the choices of the means to reap the best part of limited resources. Participation policy structures offer the means to fight against environmental degradation.
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  13. 13
    099402

    National report on population. Prepared for the International Conference on Population and Development, September 1994.

    Tunisia. Ministry of Planning and Regional Development

    [Tunis], Tunisia, Ministry of Planning and Regional Development, 1994 Aug. 57 p.

    Tunisia's country report for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development opens with a brief discussion of the country's history and development achievements (the population growth rate has been reduced from 3.2% in the beginning of the 1960s to less than 2%, and Tunisia has achieved significant improvement over the past 2 decades in human development indices). Tunisia's population policy has gone through 3 stages: the establishment of an important legal framework during the 1950s and 60s, the creation of a National Family and Population Board and establishment of basic health care facilities during the 1970s, and an emphasis on environmentally-responsible development with an attempt to strengthen the integration of population policies into development strategies beginning in the 1980s. The report continues with an overview of the demographic context (historical trends and future prospects). The chapter on population policies and programs covers the evolution and status of the policies; sectoral strategies; development and research; a profile of the family health, family planning (FP), IEC (information, education, and communication), and data collection and analysis programs. This chapter also provides details on policies and programs which link women and families to population and development and on those which concern mortality, population distribution, and migration. The third major section of the report presents operational features of the implementation of population and FP programs, in particular, political support, program formulation and execution, supervision and evaluation, financing, and the importance and relevance of the world plan of action for population. Tunisia's national action plan for the future is discussed next in terms of new problems and priorities and a mobilization of resources. This section also includes a table which sets out the components, goals, strategies, and programs of action of the population policy. In conclusion, it is stated that Tunisia's population policy fits well with the world program of action because it promotes human resources and sustainable development and respects international recommendations about human rights in general and the rights of women in particular.
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  14. 14
    099407

    Population and development issues in Botswana: a national report for the International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo - September 1994.

    Botswana. Ministry of Finance and Development Planning

    [Gaborone], Botswana, Ministry of Finance and Development Planning, 1993 Sep. [4], 43 p.

    This review of Botswana's experience with population issues and programs served both as input for the 1994 International Conference on Population and development and as an opportunity to highlight current concerns and their implications for future development. After 2 decades in which the economy grew more rapidly than the population, Botswana is experiencing a slow-down in economic growth which lends a certain urgency to creating a plan of action in regard to population growth and development. After an introductory chapter, the demographic context is reviewed in terms of trends, components of change, mortality, fertility, migration, and urbanization. Factors which have contributed to these changes, such as education, improvements in health, and growing employment are analyzed, and the role of the government is outlined. Important findings included in the report are improvements from 1981 to 1991 such as an increase in life expectancy at birth (56.3 to 62.7 years), a decrease in the infant mortality rate (71 to 45.1/1000), a decline in the total fertility rate (from an adjusted figure of 7.1 to 5.3), and an increase in those working for cash (from 48 to 80.1% of total employment). The report also identifies persistent problems such as unemployment, poverty, unwanted pregnancies, AIDS, unsafe abortions, and environmental degradation. The third chapter provides an important exploration of the links among population variables, economic development, and the environment and focuses on the impact of and on the labor force, basic needs, education, health, the infrastructure and communication, sanitary conditions, energy sources, food and clothing, and natural resources. In the next chapter, the implicit population policies and development planning issues are examined. At present, Botswana has only an implicit population policy contained in its national development plan, although efforts are underway to devise a distinct national population policy. Chapter 5 describes various types of service delivery offered by the maternal-child health (MCH) and family planning (FP) programs. Progress in the MCH/FP programs is shown by targets achieved in various indicators such as the percentage of women attending prenatal care clinics and knowledge of at least one FP method. The serious problems of maternal mortality and morbidity and of teenage pregnancy will be obvious priorities for a national safe motherhood program. In conclusion, the main findings of the report are summarized, and the future strategy for sustainable population and development is discussed in terms of new economic and social development opportunities, policy planning, data collection and analysis, training, and information, education, and communication needs.
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  15. 15
    084101

    Nations of the earth report. Volume III. United Nations Conference on Environment and Development: national reports summaries.

    United Nations Conference on Environment and Development [UNCED]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNCED, 1992. vi, 518 p.

    The UN Conference on Environment and Development's (UNCED) final volume of the Nations of the Earth Report contains 72 summary reports of 80-81 developing countries or regions. These unofficial summaries do not always reflect the full and accurate positions of the governments concerned. Instead, they give an indication of the contents of the full reports so the reader will know what to find in the full reports. UNCED analysts compiled the summaries into the following main categories: drafting process, problem areas, past and present capacity-building initiatives, recommendations and priorities on environment and development, financial arrangements and funding requirements, environmentally sound technologies, international cooperation, expectations from UNCED, and table of contents for the full report. The summaries are in English. The full reports should be available on CD-ROM by mid-1993. Summaries of regional reports cover the Arctic region, Southern African Development Coordination, USSR, and the European Community. The Pacific Island Development Coordination and Organization of Eastern Caribbean States regional reports are in volume II. The appendices include UNCED guidelines for national reports, an overview of all national reports (main findings, anticipated results of the conference, drafting process, relationship between development and environment, evaluation of the process, and classification of terms), and contents of volumes I and II.
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  16. 16
    075683

    Report of the National Seminar on Environment and Sustainable Development, Aden, 25-27 February 1989.

    Democratic Yemen; United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Unpublished] 1989. iv, 131 p.

    The 1989 final report on the environment and sustainable development includes a summary of events an a summary of types of participants in attendance. The purpose of the seminar was to provide senior national experts, policy makers, planners, and executives (in conjunction with UN representatives) with a forum for examination of issues and to propose recommendations and solutions. The level of awareness must be raised among officials and the public. Policy instruments and action must be identified in order to contribute to sustainable growth and the alleviation of poverty. The principle components of a national environmental strategy were to be outlined. The National Council for Environmental Protection needed to be reactivated. After the opening statements, the topics included in this presentation were the organization and agenda for 5 working groups, development projects and environmental considerations, environmental legislation and institutions, marine and coastal areas environment and resources, environmental awareness and education and human resources, policies and future trends, the seminar declaration and recommendations, and closing statements. The full text is provided for the opening statements, the closing statements, and the background papers. Lists of additional background papers and the seminar steering committee members are also given. The seminar declaration referred to the interlocking crises of development, environment, and energy. Population growth threatens world survival, particularly in the poorest countries. Expected economic growth will further deplete environmental resources and contribute to pollution. The world is bound together by these concerns. International debt forces poor countries to overexploit resources and destroy their production base. Developing countries are still in economic disarray. Economic reform hasn't worked for poor countries, and the resource gap is widening between countries. The answer is sustainable development, which is based on an equitable and rational exploitation of natural resources. International cooperation and peace must be strengthened dialogue and understanding and support for the UN.
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  17. 17
    074857

    International Symposium: For the Survival of Mankind: Population, Environment and Development.

    Mainichi Shimbun; Japan. National Institute for Research Advancement; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    Ann Arbor, Michigan, University of Michigan, Dept. of Population Planning and International Health, [1989]. xxxiii, 134 p.

    In August 1989, scientists and leaders of international and national groups met at the international symposium for the Survival of Mankind in Tokyo, Japan, to discuss ideas about the interrelationship between population, environment, and development and obstacles to attaining sustainable development. The President of the Worldwatch Institute opened the symposium with a talk about energy, food, and population. Of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and solar energy, only the clean and efficient solar energy can provide sustainable development. Humanity has extended arable lands and irrigation causing soil erosion, reduced water tables, produced water shortages, and increased salivation. Thus agricultural advances since the 1950s cannot continue to raise crop yields. He also emphasized the need to halt population growth. He suggested Japan provide more international assistance for sustainable development. This talk stimulated a lively debate. The 2nd session addressed the question whether the planet can support 5. 2 billion people (1989 population). The Executive Director of UNFPA informed the audience that research shows that various factors are needed for a successful population program: political will, a national plan, a prudent assessment of the sociocultural context, support from government agencies, community participation, and improvement of women's status. Other topics discussed during this session were urbanization, deforestation, and international environmental regulation. The 3rd session covered various ways leading to North-South cooperation. A Chinese participant suggested the establishment of an international environmental protection fund which would assist developing countries with their transition to sustainable development and to develop clean energy technologies and environmental restoration. Another participant proposed formation of a North-South Center in Japan. The 4th session centered around means to balance population needs, environmental protection, and socioeconomic development.
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  18. 18
    081535

    Climate change: the IPCC response strategies.

    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [IPCC]

    Washington, D.C., Island Press, 1991. lxii, 272 p.

    In 1988, the World Meteorological Organization and the UN Environment Program established the Intergovernmental Panel on climate Change (IPCC) to consider scientific data on various factors of the climate change issue, e.g., emissions of major greenhouse gases, and to draw up realistic response strategies to manage this issue. Its members have agreed that emissions from human activities are indeed increasing sizably the levels of carbon dioxide, methane, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), and nitrous oxide in the atmosphere. The major conclusions are that effective responses need a global effort and both developed and developing countries must take responsibility to implement these responses. Industrialized countries must modify their economies to limit emissions because most emissions into the atmosphere come from these countries. They should cooperate with and also provide financial and technical assistance to developing countries to raise their living standards while preventing and managing environmental problems. Concurrently, developing countries must adopt measures to also limit emissions as their economies expand. Environmental protection must be the base for continuing economic development. There must be an education campaign to inform the public about the issue and the needed changes. Strategies and measures to confront rapid population growth must be included in a flexible and progressive approach to sustainable development. Specific short-term actions include improved energy efficiency, cleaner energy sources and technologies, phasing out CFCs, improved forest management and expansion of forests, improved livestock waste management, modified use and formulation of fertilizers, and changes in agricultural land use. Longer term efforts are accelerated and coordinated research programs, development of new technologies, behavioral and structural changes (e.g., transportation), and expansion of global ocean observing and monitoring systems.
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  19. 19
    074671

    Strengthening protected areas.

    World Resources Institute; World Conservation Union [IUCN]; United Nations Environment Programme [UNEP]; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; UNESCO

    In: Global biodiversity strategy: guidelines for action to save, study, and use Earth's biotic wealth sustainably and equitably, [compiled by] World Resources Institute [WRI], World Conservation Union [IUCN], United Nations Environment Programme [UNEP], in consultation with Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO], UNESCO. [Washington, D.C.], WRI, 1992. 117-32.

    There are 8163 protected areas worldwide covering 750 million hectares of marine and terrestrial ecosystems amounting to 5.1% of national land area. One objective is to identify national and international priorities for biodiversity conservation by national reviews of protected area systems; by immediate and longterm action for establishing protected areas (strictly protected areas of nature reserves, national parks and extractive areas of habitat and wildlife management areas and protected landscapes); by international assessment of requirements (authorization and funding of the IUCN Commission on National Parks and Protected Areas and use of the analyses of the 4th World Congress on National PArks and Protected Areas, February 1992, and the Parks in Peril program that identified 200 sites in Latin America); by promoting the establishment of private protected areas; and by international cooperation in area management (the International Council for Bird Preservation and the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network identified the habitat of migratory birds). Another objective is to ensure the sustainability of protected areas and to contribute to biodiversity conservation by more extensive participation in protected area management plans (internal management of each site, human use of protected areas, development and bioregion resource use policies, study of biodiversity, and financial needs); by expanded management objectives of protected areas; by increasing the ecological and social value of protected areas through external land purchase and zoning and conservation of adjacent private lands; by raising the ecological and social value of such areas through expanded benefits to people (nature tourism and employment related to protection); and by restoring degraded lands within protected areas and adjacent lands.
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  20. 20
    054796

    Population and sustainable development.

    International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources [IUCN]. Task Force on Population and Conservation for Sustainable Development

    Gland, Switzerland, IUCN, 1987. 63 p.

    A special Task Force Report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources focusing on population contains chapters on demographic trends, structural changes and future growth, population policies, family planning programs, relations between population, conservation and development, and recommendations. Unprecedented population growth in this century is such that most countries have people living who have seen their population triple, and Zimbabwe as an example of an African country has grown 8-fold in this period. Population growth is only 1 among many factors that aggravate conservation and development; others include decreasing food supply, inappropriate development patterns fostered by debt, trade imbalances, misguided aid, and even the food surpluses of the North. Current environmental crises will contribute to a predicted 33% loss in arable land by 2000. The report ends with 12 recommendations, e.g., corroboration by country-level population, conservation and development agencies by identifying relevant institutions and introducing coordinating mechanisms. Every couple should be provided with means to plan their family, an effort estimated to cost $6 billion more than the current $2 billion being spent. Women should be given the right of choice about pregnancy, education, and integration into socio-economic development.
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  21. 21
    052159

    Our common future.

    World Commission on Environment and Development

    Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1987. xv, 400 p.

    In this report, the World Commission on Environment and Development does not predict ever increasing environmental decay, poverty, and hardship in a world becoming more polluted and experiencing decreasing resources but sees instead the possibility for a new era of economic growth. This era of economic growth must be based on policies that sustain and expand the environmental resource base. Such growth is absolutely essential to relieving the great poverty that is intensifying in much of the developing world. The report suggests a pathway by which the peoples of the world can enlarge their spheres of cooperation. The Commission has focused its attention in the areas of population, food security, the loss of species and genetic resources, and human settlements, recognizing that all are connected and cannot be treated in isolation from each other. 2 conditions must be satisfied before international economic exchanges can become beneficial for all involved: the sustainability of ecosystems on which the global economy depends must be guaranteed; and the economic partners must be satisfied that the basis of exchange is equitable. Neither condition is met for many developing nations. Efforts to maintain social and ecological stability through old approaches to development and environmental protection will increase stability. The Commission has identified several actions that must be undertaken to reduce risks to survival and to put future development on sustainable paths. Such a reorientation on a continuing basis is beyond the reach of present decision making structures and institutional arrangements, both national and international. The Commission has taken care to base its recommendations on the realities of present institutions, on what can and must be accomplished now; yet to keep options open for future generations, the present generation must begin to act now and to act together. The Commission's proposals for institutional and legal change at the national, regional, and international levels are embodied in 6 priority areas: getting at the sources; dealing with the effects; assessing global risks; making informed choices; providing the legal means; and investing in the future.
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  22. 22
    040281

    [Workshop on Sensitization of Communication Professionals to Population Problems, Dakar, 29 August, 1986 at Breda] Seminaire atelier de sensibilisation des professionnels de la communication aux problemes de population, Dakar du 25 au 29 Aout 1986 au Breda.

    Senegal. Ministere du Plan et de la Cooperation

    Dakar, Senegal, UNICOM, Unite de Communication, 1986. 215 p. (Unite de Communication Projet SEN/81/P01)

    This document is the result of a workshop organized by the Communication Unit of the Senegalese Ministry of Planning and Cooperation to sensitize some 30 Senegalese journalists working in print and broadcast media to the importance of the population variable in development and to prepare them to contribute to communication programs for population. Although it is addressed primarily to professional communicators, it should also be of interest to educators, economists, health workers, demographers, and others interested in the Senegalese population. The document is divided into 5 chapters, the 1st of which comprises a description of the history and objectives of the Communication Unit, which is funded by the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). Chapter 1 also presents the workshop agenda. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to population problems and different currents of thought regarding population since Malthus, a discussion of the utilization and interpretation of population variables, and definitions of population indicators. The 3rd chapter explores problems of population and development in Senegal, making explicit the theoretical concepts of the previous chapter in the context of Senegal. Topics discussed in chapter 3 include the role of UNFPA in introducing the population variable in development projects in Senegal; population and development, the situation and trends of the Senegalese population; socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the Senegalese population; sources of sociodemographic data on Senegal; the relationship between population, resources, environment and development in Senegal; and the Senegalese population policy. Chapter 4 discusses population communication, including population activities of UNESCO and general problems of social communication; a synthesis and interpretation of information needs and the role of population communication; and a summary of the workshop goals, activities, and achievements. Chapter 5 contains annexes including a list of participants, opening and closing remarks, an evaluation questionnaire regarding the workshop participants, and press clippings relating to the workshop and to Senegal's population.
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  23. 23
    273090

    Social studies and population education. Book Three: man in his environment.

    University of Sierra Leone. Institute of Education

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, Ministry of Education, 1984. 93 p. (UNFPA/UNESCO Project SIL/76/POI)

    The National Programme in Social Studies in Sierra Leone has created this textbook in the social sciences, with an emphasis on population education, for 2ndary school students. Unit 1, "Man's Origin, Development and Characteristics," describes Darwin's theory of evolution and explains how overproduction causes problems of rapid population growth and poor quality of life. Special attention is given to the problem of high infant mortality in Sierra Leone. Unit 2, "Man's Environment," discusses the interrelationships and interdependence among elements in the ecosystem, the food pyramid, and the effects of man's activities and numbers on the ecosystem. Unit 3, "Man's Culture," focuses on the processes of socialization and the different agents of socialization: the family, the group, the school, and the community. Unit 4, "Population and Resources," discusses human and natural resources as well as conservation measures. It also discusses the population composition, its effect on resources, and the uses and significance of population data. Unit 5, "Communication in the Service of Man," covers land, water and air transport; the effects of transport developments in Sierra Leone; and implications for population of changes in transport activities. Unit 6, "Global Issues: Achievements and Problems," deals with the young population, characteristics of the adolescent, common social problems among young people, and the role of the family unit. National and international action is also discussed.
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  24. 24
    030012

    Report of the Expert Group on Population, Resources, Environment and Development.

    United Nations. Expert Group on Population, Resources, Environment and Development

    In: Population, resources, environment and development. Proceedings of the Expert Group on Population, Resources, Environment and Development, Geneva, 25-29 April 1983, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. New York, New York, United Nations, 1984. 1-60. (Population Studies No. 90; ST/ESA/SER.A/90; International Conference on Population, 1984)

    The primary objective of the meeting of the Expert Group on Population, Resources, Environment, and Development was to identify mechanisms through which poulation characteristics conditioned and were conditioned by resource use, environmental effects, and the development structure. This called for a systems approach in which all factors were treated simultaneously and in which the closing of loops through feedback effects was of foremost importance. The 1st item of the agenda called for a general discussion of past and future trends in population, resources, environment, and development. The Expert Group emphasized the need for better knowledge of how the trends of the various variables interacted and modified each other and particularly about the role of population within the interrelationships. The discussion of food and nutrition focused on the demographic, economic, social, political, and institutional aspects of meeting the needs for food and nutrition, while the physical aspects were given greater attention in the discussions of resources and environments. At the center of the deliberations were such concerns as poverty, the food versus feed controversy, food self sufficiency, and the role of population growth. The discussion on resources and the environment covered the resource base, environmental degradation, and nonrenewable resources. Attention was directed to the various mechanisms that could expand resource availability as well as those activities that had caused a degradation of the environment. The discussions of social and economic aspects of development involved 4 interrelated topics: income distribution, employment, health and education, and social security. The last items on the agenda addressed the issue of integrated planning and policy formation. Some members of the Expert Group were concerned with immediate problems. Viewing demographic trends as largely exogenous, they gave highest priority to finding the best way to accommodate the needs of growing populations. Others emphasized longrun problems and considered demographic trends as policy instruments for dealing with problems of resources, the environment, and development.
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    020976

    IUCN action.

    International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources [IUCN]

    Earthwatch. 1984; (16):7.

    The International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN), cooperates with the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and other agencies to: actively promote policies designed to attain a balance between population and resources, within national conservation strategies and through field activities to preserve nature and natural resources; take into account the fundamental issues of population and resources in its policies, programs, resolutions, and public statements, where appropriate; keep trends in population and resources under review, reporting back to each IUCN General Assembly; encourage nongovernment organizations, including local conservation groups and family planning associations, to work together to spread awareness of the links between population, resources, and the environment; encourage governments to undertake periodic assessments of population trends, natural resources, and likely economic conditions, their interrelationships and the implications for the achievement of national goals; encourage governments to establish a population policy and to consider the special environmental problems of the urban and rural poor and to promote sustainable rural development; encourage nations to take effective action to obtain the basic right of all couples to have access to safe and effective family planning methods, as established in the World Population Plan of Action; and generally encourage national and international development policies which help create the conditions in which human population can successfully be brought into balance with carefully conserved natural resources.
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