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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    798488

    The ILO: legislation and working women.

    Korchounova E

    In: Jelliffe DB, Jelliffe EF, Sai FT, Senanayake P, eds. Lactation, fertility and the working woman. London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1979. 39-44.

    The International Labor Organization's (ILO) conventions and recommendations that apply exclusively to women are of 2 main types: promotional and protective. The protective standards are concerned with providing them with the special protection they need because of their sociological and social function of maternity. Maternity protection is most important for both working mothers and society as a whole. This is becoming a more significant problem because of the increase in the number and proportion of women. The protection of working women in connection with their role as mothers was dealt with in 2 ILO conventions, the Maternity Protection Conventnion and the Maternity Protection Convention (Revised), and 2 recommendations. The 1919 instrument was ratified by 28 States and the 1952 instrument by 17 States (on January 1, 1977). The ILO policy on maternity protection is that maternity must be recognized as a social function and the protection of this function must be recognized as a basic human right. In relation with maternity, women and men require full and free access to information and facilities concerning family planning and the right to decide on family size and the spacing of births. The 1919 Convention provides that the working woman be allowed time to nurse her child. In a large majority of countries, rules provide for rest periods to allow a mother to feed her child during working hours. A number of legislations stipulate explicitly that the pauses for feeding must be allowed in addition to the normal rest periods. The 1952 Recommendation refers to the establishment of facilities for nursing or day care.
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  2. 2
    798451

    Lactation, fertility and the working woman.

    Jelliffe BD; Jelliffe EF; Sai FT; Senanayake P

    London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1979. 163 p.

    Focus in the proceedings of the joint International Planned Parenthood Federation and the International Union of Nutritional Sciences Conference on lactation, fertility, and the working woman is on the following: 1) perspectives of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and the International Union of Nutritional Sciences (IUNS); 2) lactation and infertility interaction; 3) United Nations appraoches; 4) the social context (breastfeeding and the working woman, breast feeding in decline, and women's liberation and breastfeeding); and 5) case studies for the countries of France, Egypt, Ghana, Scandinavia, Chile, Indonesia, Lebanon, Yugoslavia, Singapore, and Sri Lanka. Breastfeeding supplies nutrition specifically adapted to the human infant's needs, mother/child interaction important to emotional development, and biological birth spacing resulting from maternal hormonal changes brought about by sucking. Over the last 50 years, there has been a marked decline in breastfeeding, originally in industrialized countries. Since the end of World War 2, there has been a decline in breastfeeding in developing nations. Recent scientific research has shown increasing evidence of the unique value of human milk and breastfeeding for infants in industrilized countries and developing areas. As women have become more emancipated, conflicts have arisen between their biological family reproductive role and their role as salaried workers outside the home.
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  3. 3
    800359

    What we have learned about family planning in the Calabar Rural MCH/FP Project (Nigeria).

    Weiss E; Udo AA

    [Unpublished] 1980. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Denver, Colorado, April 10-12, 1980. 34 p.

    The Calabar Rural Maternal and Child Health/Family (MCH/FP) Project ran from July 1975 to December 1980 funded by the Cross River State Government Ministry of Health with assistance from the Population Council (New York) and the UN Fund for Population Activities. Calabar met the following requirements: it is rural; population between 200,000-500,000; family planning and maternal and child health is integrated from the top level of administration to the delivery of services to the clients; the target population is all women who deliver within the area and their children up to 5 years; services are at levels that can be expanded to larger areas of the country; and attention is given to evaluation of both health benefits and results of family planning services. As a model of health care delivery services to be used throughout the developing world, maternal health services are most important because the level of preventable deaths is highest in preschool children and in women at childbirth and MCH is the most appropriate an effective vehicle for introducing family planning. At the end of the Calabar Rural MCH/FP Project, the office will be closed but the services will continue under the direction of the local governments in Cross River State. 6 health centers and 1 hospital served 275 villages. Knowledge of contraception was low but positively associated with education.
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  4. 4
    797006

    Family planning [Editorial].

    Peel J

    PRACTITIONER. 1979; 223(1337):611-2.

    Since the term "family planning" was 1st introduced into medical terminology approximately 50 years ago, the movement has grown and expanded. What was originally intended as contraceptive services for married women, usually of high parity and low socioeconomic status, has spread to unmarried women. When family planning clinics were taken over by and incorporated into the National Health Service, the original role of the Family Planning Association became less clearly defined. Family planning services today include sex education, sexual sterilization, research into reversible methods of sterilization, research into the effect of oral contraceptives on general sex behavior, and infertility clinics. New technological advances in the field of fertility, e.g., artificial insemination, cannot be justified by the health needs of the parents or the social need to lower population. There is some question as to whether public funds should be spent to gratify what are sometimes selfish parental concerns.
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  5. 5
    791259

    Thailand: report of mission on needs assessment for population assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, June 1979. (Report No. 13) 151 p

    This report is intended to serve, and has already to some extent so served, as part of the background material used by the United Nations Fund for Population Activities to evaluate project proposals as they relate to basic country needs for population assistance to Thailand, and in broader terms to define priorities of need in working towards eventual self-reliance in implementing the country's population activities. The function of the study is to determine the extent to which activities in the field of population provide Thailand with the fundamental capacity to deal with major population problems in accordance with its development policies. The assessment of population activities in Thailand involves a 3-fold approach. The main body of the report examines 7 categories of population activities rather broadly in the context of 10 elements considered to reflect effect ve government action. The 7 categories of population activities are: 1) basic data collection; 2) population dynamics; 3) formulation and evaluation of population policies and programs; 4) implementation of policies; 5) family planning programs; 6) communication a and education; and 7) special programs. The 10 elements comprise: 1) decennial census of population, housing, and agriculture; 2) an effective registration system; 3) assessment of the implications of population trends; 4) formulation of a comprehensive national population policy; 5) implementation of action programs integrated with related programs of economic and social development; 6) continued reduction in the population growth rate; 7) effective utilization of the services of private and voluntary organizations in action programs; 8) a central administrative unit to coordinate action programs; 9) evaluation of the national capacity in technical training, research, and production of equipment and supplies; and 10) maintenance of continuing liason and cooperation with other countries and with regional and international organizations.
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  6. 6
    784293

    Local responses to global problems: a key to meeting basic human needs.

    STOKES B

    Washington, D.C., Worldwatch Institute, February 1978. (Worldwatch Paper No. 17) 64 p

    According to a World Bank estimate, large scale international efforts to improve social and economic conditions in developing countries would cost 47.1 billion dollars between 1980-2000. Since rich countries have not been disposed in the past to contribute heavily toward solving these problems, it is unlikely that they will commit themselves to this type of financial help in the future. Collective, self-help efforts on the local level may offer a feasible alternative for aleviating global problems of inadequate housing, food shortages, insufficient medical care, and energy shortages. Small scale efforts which enlist community involvement in the initiation, planning, and carrying out of projects are frequently more effective in creating uplift than are larger efforts controlled by individuals outside the community. Attempts to provide better housing for the poor through building large public housing complexes are costly and tend to create non-livable conditions for many of the poor; self-help efforts such as homesteading and rehabilitation, on the other hand, have been more successful. In developing areas massive national programs to relocate squatters have failed. Efforts to help squatters improve the dwellings they presently inhabit may be a more fruitful approach. The recent emphasis on garden plots for urban dwellers and small labor intensive family farms along with marketing cooperatives in the rural areas may reduce malnutrition and protect the poor from inflationary food prices. At the present time 1/5 of the world's population is still without medical care and many others have inadequate health care. The mobilization of individuals for self care, especially in regard to disease prevention, and the decentralization of health services through the establishment of neighborhood health centers, family planning clinics, and systems utilizing barefoot doctors can help overcome present health deficiencies. The energy problem can be partially solved by individual efforts to conserve resources. Many individuals and communities are developing local solar, wind, and water sources and are thus reducing reliance on the highly centralized energy industries.
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  7. 7
    746023

    Development and population policy in Ceylon.

    Kodikara SU

    In: Fukutake, T. and Morioka, K., eds. Sociology and social development in Asia. Tokyo, University of Tokyo Press, 1974. p. 39-60

    The history of the development of a population policy in Ceylon is given. Ceylon has a high rate of growth due to a declining death rate and a high steady birthrate. A continuing economic crisis has been aggravated by the high birthrate, and the unemployment rate is over 12%. Increased food production has been inadequate, and welfare policies have limited funds available for productive investment. The Family Planning Association (FPA) in Ceylon was founded in January 1953 and has received financial support from several sources, most importantly from the Swedish International Development Authority. In the 3 plans during 1955-1965 emphasis has been laid on the relation between economic development and population growth. The Sirimavo Bandaranaike Government's Short-Term Implementation Programme of 1962 stated the urgency of the economic problem and its connection with the rate of population growth. From 1965 the Government of Ceylon made family planning an official responsibility. Family planning work was taken over by the Dept. of Health. The FPA has devoted itself to the dissemination of propaganda on family planning. Official policy on family planning has tended to become ambivalent because of a charge that family planning could turn the ethnic balance against the Sinhalese. In April 1971 there was an insurrection that threatened the existence of the government, and realizing it was due to unemployment, living costs, and fragmentation of land, the Government incorporated a note that facilities for family planning among all groups are essential.
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  8. 8
    723681

    Iran (Profile).

    Friesen JK; Moore RV

    Country Profiles. 1972 Oct; 19.

    The estimated population of Iran in 1972 was 31,000,000, with an estimated rate of natural increase of 3.2% per year. In 1966 61% of the population lived in rural areas, male literacy was 41% and female literacy 18%. Coitus interruptus is the most common form of contraception used in Iran, followed by condoms. Because of the rapid rate of population growth, the government has taken a strong stand in support of family planning. The Ministry of Health coordinates family planning activities through the Family Planning Division. Contraceptive supplies are delivered free of charge through clinics. The national family planning program also is involved in postpartum programs, training of auxiliary personnel, communication and motivation for family planning population education, evaluation and research. The overall goal of the program is to reduce the growth rate of 2.4% by 1978, and to 1% by 1990.
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