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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    333111

    Human rights and gender equality in health sector strategies. How to assess policy coherence.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; United Nations. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights [OHCHR]; Sweden. Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency [SIDA]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2011. [163] p.

    This tool, developed in collaboration between WHO, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) is designed to support countries to strengthen national health strategies by applying human rights and gender equality commitments and obligations. The tool poses critical questions to identify gaps and opportunities in the review or reform of health sector strategies.
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  2. 2
    303737

    Supporting national HIV / AIDS responses: an implementation approach. The answer lies within.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Development Policy. HIV / AIDS Group

    New York, New York, UNDP, Bureau for Development Policy, HIV / AIDS Group, 2004. 32 p.

    HIV/AIDS multi-sectoral strategic planning has been promoted and successfully undertaken in a number of countries. In most cases, the planning process results in the design and completion of national strategic frameworks (NSF) or plans. While such frameworks continue to provide valuable strategic orientation, they have often not served the intended purpose of guiding successful and well-coordinated implementation at national, provincial, regional, district, constituency and community levels. To date, the transformation of strategic frameworks into effective and coordinated action remains a major concern for most governments and their partners. The broad diversity of actors, the numerous sectors involved and the variety of components of the response illustrate the complexity of implementation and coordination. To achieve a strategic multi-sectoral response, it is important to develop a strategic framework and management approach consistent with national policies, priorities and local experiences. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    290742
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization European Health in Prisons project after 10 years: persistent barriers and achievements.

    Gatherer A; Moller L; Hayton P

    American Journal of Public Health. 2005 Oct; 95(10):1696-1700.

    The recognition that good prison health is important to general public health has led 28 countries in the European Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) to join a WHO network dedicated to improving health within prisons. Within the 10 years since that time, vital actions have been taken and important policy documents have been produced. A key factor in making progress is breaking down the isolation of prison health services and bringing them into closer collaboration with the country’s public health services. However, barriers to progress remain. A continuing challenge is how best to move from policy recommendations to implementation, so that the network’s fundamental aim of noticeable improvements in the health and care of prisoners is further achieved. (author's)
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  4. 4
    276967

    From Bangkok to Mexico: towards a framework for turning knowledge into action to improve health systems [editorial]

    Pang T; Pablos-Mendez A; Ijsselmuiden C

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2004 Oct; 82(10):720-721.

    As a follow-up to the International Conference on Health Research for Development that took place in Bangkok, Thailand, in 2000, WHO convened a Ministerial Summit on Health Research to be held in Mexico City in November 2004, to review progress to date and reflect on emerging opportunities in the global field of health research. In 1990, the Commission on Health Research for Development recommended that all countries should undertake essential national health research; it stipulated that international partnerships are the foundations for progress and that financing for these efforts should be mobilized from both international and national sources. In 1996, WHO'S Ad Hoc Committee on Health Research Relating to Future Intervention Options outlined a five-step priority-setting approach to decide how health research funds should be allocated. It identified "best buys" for the development of products and procedures in several key areas, including childhood infections, malnutrition, microbial threats, noncommunicable diseases and health systems. Overall, progress has been slow and there is much more to be done to deal with major health challenges. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    279806

    Reforms in health system in India [Editorial]

    Lal S; Vashisht BM

    Indian Journal of Community Medicine. 2002 Jul-Sep; 27(3):[7] p..

    Health systems have undergone overlapping generations of reforms in the past 100 years, including the founding of national health care systems and extension of social insurance schemes. Subsequently to realize the goal of "Health for all" the system of primary health care was adopted the world over. The system of primary health care paid too little attention to the people's demand for health care and it concentrated exclusively on the perceived needs. In the past decade or so there has been gradual shift of vision towards what WHO calls the "New Universalism" high quality delivery of essential care, defined mostly by criterion of cost-effectiveness, for everyone, rather than all possible care for the whole population or only the simplest and most basic care for the poor. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    278924

    The level of effort in the national response to HIV / AIDS: the AIDS Program Effort Index (API), 2003 round.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]; Futures Group. POLICY Project

    Washington, D.C., USAID, 2003 Dec. [50] p.

    The success of HIV/AIDS programs can be affected by many factors, including political commitment, program effort, socio-cultural context, political systems, economic development, extent and duration of the epidemic , and resources available. Many programs track low-level inputs (e.g., training workshops conducted, condoms distributed) or outcomes (e.g., percentage of acts protected by condom use). Measures of program effort are generally confined to the existence or lack of major program elements (e.g., condom social marketing, counseling and testing). To assist countries in such evaluation efforts, several guides have been developed by the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and other organizations (see, for example, “Meeting the Behavioural Data Collection Needs of National HIV/AIDS and STD Programmes” and “National AIDS Programs: A Guide to Monitoring and Evaluation of HIV/AIDS Programs”). However, information about the policy environment, level of political support, and other contextual issues affecting the success and failure of national AIDS programs has not been addressed previously. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    189452

    Infant and young child feeding. A tool for assessing national practices, policies and programmes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. xvi, 140 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00007-00)

    This Tool is designed to assist users in assessing the status of infant and young child feeding practices, policies, and programmes in their country. The purpose of such an assessment is to identify strengths and possible weaknesses, with a view to improving the protection, promotion, and support of optimal infant and young child feeding. The Tool is designed to be a flexible instrument. It can be used in its entirety, which is preferred, or in part, and can be employed by a range of users for various purposes. The approach taken may depend on: - the stage of policy and programme development in the country concerned; - the commitment of key decision-makers to undertake the assessment and to use the results; and - the human and financial resources available. The Tool can be used as a companion piece to the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding as an assessment tool to help determine where improvements might be needed to meet the Global Strategy targets. Consideration should be given to using the Tool periodically, every several years, to track trends on the various indicators, report on progress, identify areas still needing improvement, and assist in the planning process. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    181179
    Peer Reviewed

    Health sector reform in sub-Saharan Africa: a synthesis of country experiences.

    Lambo E; Sambo LG

    East African Medical Journal. 2003 Jun; 80(6 Suppl):S1-S20.

    Health sector reform is 'a sustained process of fundamental changes in national health policy, institutional arrangements, etc. guided by government and designed to improve the functioning and performance of the health sector and, ultimately, the health status of the population'. All the forty six countries in the African Region of the World Health Organisation have embarked on one form of health sector reform or the other. The contexts and contents of their health reform programmes have varied from one country to another. Health reforms in the region have been influenced largely by the poor performance of the health systems, particularly with regard to the quality of health services. Most countries have taken due congnizance of the deficiencies on their health systems in the design of their health reform programmes and they have made some progress in the implementation of such programmes. Indeed, some countries have adopted sector-wide approaches (SWAps) in developing and implementing their health reform programmes. Since countries are at various stages of implementing their health reform programmes, there is a lot of potential for countries to learn from one another. This paper is a synthesis of the experiences of the countries of the Region in the development and implementation of their health sector reform programmes, it also highlights the future perspectives in this important area. (author's)
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