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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    181179
    Peer Reviewed

    Health sector reform in sub-Saharan Africa: a synthesis of country experiences.

    Lambo E; Sambo LG

    East African Medical Journal. 2003 Jun; 80(6 Suppl):S1-S20.

    Health sector reform is 'a sustained process of fundamental changes in national health policy, institutional arrangements, etc. guided by government and designed to improve the functioning and performance of the health sector and, ultimately, the health status of the population'. All the forty six countries in the African Region of the World Health Organisation have embarked on one form of health sector reform or the other. The contexts and contents of their health reform programmes have varied from one country to another. Health reforms in the region have been influenced largely by the poor performance of the health systems, particularly with regard to the quality of health services. Most countries have taken due congnizance of the deficiencies on their health systems in the design of their health reform programmes and they have made some progress in the implementation of such programmes. Indeed, some countries have adopted sector-wide approaches (SWAps) in developing and implementing their health reform programmes. Since countries are at various stages of implementing their health reform programmes, there is a lot of potential for countries to learn from one another. This paper is a synthesis of the experiences of the countries of the Region in the development and implementation of their health sector reform programmes, it also highlights the future perspectives in this important area. (author's)
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  2. 2
    094276

    The social impact of cost recovery measures in Zimbabwe.

    Nyambuya MN

    SOUTHERN AFRICA POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC MONTHLY. 1994 Mar; 7(6):14-5.

    Since the International Monetary Fund/World Bank Economic Structural Adjustment Program (ESAP) in Zimbabwe was adopted in 1990, health care and education costs have escalated, and many people fail to get these services owing to poverty. The post-independence era in Zimbabwe witnessed a tremendous growth in education and health with many schools, colleges, hospitals and clinics built, professional staff employed, and a general expansion in demand. Nevertheless, the question of drug shortages and ever-increasing health care costs were not addressed. A deficient transport network, the increases in drug prices, the exodus of professional staff, the devaluation of the Zimbabwe dollar, and the cost recovery measures endangered the right to acceptable health care. The social service cutbacks adopted by the government in education will deepen poverty. After independence, the Zimbabwean education system had a free tuition policy at primary school levels. Now that the government reintroduced school fees, a generation of illiterate and semi-illiterate school dropouts will grow up. The social implications of this include increases in crime, prostitution, the number of street kids, the spread of diseases, and social discontent, which are the symptoms of a shrinking economy. As a result of the cost recovery measures, school enrollment in rural areas has gone up. Some urban parents have been forced to transfer their children to rural schools. Higher education also suffers, as government subsidies to colleges and universities have been drastically curtailed. The budgetary cuts have grave repercussions for teaching and research, as poor working conditions and low morals of lecturers and students become prevalent. Most wage-earning Zimbabweans' living standards have deteriorated as the cost of living continues to escalate, coupled with the cost recovery measures in the name of ESAP.
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  3. 3
    080406
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO commends India.

    INDIAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES. 1992 Feb; 46(2):56-7.

    WHO finds that the health services and the health systems in India have improved. For example, India has made considerable improvement in expansion of health services to rural areas (7-10% expansion) and to the poor. Further, allocation to the minimum needs program, according to the state sector plan, has risen from 42.6% to 50%. In addition, infant and maternal mortality rates have fallen. Improved immunization coverage, prenatal care services, diarrhea prevention, malaria control, and contraceptive use have all contributed to the reduction in infant and maternal deaths. Health and welfare programs have generally institutionalized the primary health care concept of community participation. Training for health workers, policymakers, and personnel from nongovernmental organizations has expanded. Nevertheless, life expectancy has essentially not changed. Besides, WHO notes that the disease patterns have not changed. Some regions of India have disease patterns of developed countries, however. India has the highest number of malaria cases in southeastern Asia (almost 71%) and the second highest number of women with anemia. The number of HIV-positive and AIDS cases is growing. More than 374 million people are at risk of lymphatic filariasis, and Japanese encephalitis has become entrenched in India. 5% of the population are positive for hepatitis viruses. 1% have iodine deficiency disorders.
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  4. 4
    070823

    Romania.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1991]. v, 36 p. (Report)

    The former government of Romania sought to maintain existing population and accelerate population growth by restricting migration, increasing fertility, and reducing mortality. The provision and use of family planning (FP) were subject to restrictions and penalties beginning in 1986, the legal marriage age for females was lowered to 15 years, and incentives were provided to bolster fertility. These and other government policies have contributed to existing environmental pollution, poor housing, insufficient food, and major health problems in the country. To progress against population-related problems, Romania most urgently needs to gather reliable population and socioeconomic data for planning purposes, establish the ability to formulate population policy and undertake related activities, rehabilitate the health system and introduce modern FP methods, education health personnel and the public about FP methods, promote awareness of the need for population education, and establish that women's interests are served in government policy and action. These topics, recommendations, and the role of foreign assistance are discussed in turn.
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  5. 5
    079171

    Health trends and prospects in relation to population and development.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    In: The population debate: dimensions and perspectives. Papers of the World Population Conference, Bucharest, 1974. Volume I. New York, New York, United Nations, 1975. 573-97. (Population Studies, No. 57; ST/ESA/SER.A/57)

    WHO presented a discussion on health trends and prospects in relation to population and development at the World Population Conference in Bucharest, Romania, in 1974. Even though many countries did not have available detailed results of 1970 population censuses, WHO was able to determine using the limited available data that both developing and developed countries could still make substantial reductions in death rates. This room for improvement was especially great for developing countries. Infectious diseases predominated as the cause of death in developing countries, while chronic diseases and accidents predominated in developed countries. Life expectancy at birth in developing countries was lower than that in developed countries (48.3-60.3 years vs. 70 years). Any life expectancy gains were likely to be slower after 1970 than during the 1950-1970 period. WHO claimed that by 2000 almost all of the population in developing and developed countries could reach a life expectancy of 60-65 years and 75-80 years, respectively. WHO stressed the complex interactions among population growth, health, and socioeconomic development. Specifically, an improved health status for both individuals and communities would promote socioeconomic development which in turn appeared to reduce natural increase. Some experts have expressed concern that investment in health services spurs population growth because they reduce mortality. Yet the child survival hypothesis indicated that a reduced infant mortality precedes increased demand for family planning methods and subsequent fertility decline. WHO concurred with the hypothesis and advocated that primary health services and family planning are critical to socioeconomic development. Indeed, family planning services should be integrated with maternal and child health services.
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  6. 6
    070608

    Analysis of health services expenditures in the Gambia: 1981-1991.

    Barth L; Makinen M

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow, Inc. [JSI], Resources for Child Health Project [REACH], 1986 Jun. [3], 31, [11] p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5927-C-00-5068-00)

    In the mid 1980s, the Government of The Gambia (GOTG) sought funds from the World Bank and other donors to restructure and strengthen its health system. Since the World Bank thought that recurrent cost obligations that the GOTG would find unacceptable should accompany the implementation of the National Health Project (NHP), this study was undertaken. The Italian Government agreed to fund US $9.8 million to NHP, most of the funds going to renovating and refurbishing the pediatric ward and central laboratory at Royal Victoria Hospital in Banjul. Trends in health sector expenditures showed that the devaluation of the dalasi continued to bring about shortfalls in nonsalary costs, especially in drugs and dressings. Therefore the GOTG must address the shortfalls before even considering expansion of the already inefficient health delivery system. It also needs to develop a cost recovery system for drugs which maintains a reliable source and adequate supplies of drugs in the proper amounts, effectively distributes the drugs, and manages the finances effectively. The GOTG should also develop the Ministry of Health's ability to coordinate donor support and to develop a process of budgeting, spending, and planning. The study team also recommended consolidating staff rather than expand staff in light of financial constraints. A flotation policy and exchange rates less favorable to the dalasi may grant the GOTG more access to exchange within the banking system.
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  7. 7
    070007
    Peer Reviewed

    Zambia: focus on humanitarian care of AIDS patients [news]

    INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW. 1991 Mar-Apr; 38(2):31.

    A brief report summarizes issues and concepts discussed by participants from Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia at the 2nd ICN/WHO intercountry conference in Lusaka, Zambia. Broadly discussing nursing care of people with HIV/AIDS and their families, counseling and case/family support should be considered major components of local initiatives in Africa. While local constraints must be recognized in diagnosing, counseling, caring for, and supporting cases and families, programs may also build upon community strengths. Present official health services are often unable to accommodate the needs of all patients with HIV/AIDS. Participants therefore examined innovative, new home-based approaches to care and case/family support. Examples of community-based support programs tailored to meet local needs are mentioned. The role of counseling in both case/family support and for behavioral change is also voiced. A multidisciplinary approach carried out by open, flexible, and understanding personnel is required. Nurses must provide clinical care to cases while also working to facilitate behavioral change.
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  8. 8
    270552

    First phase of National Primary Health Care Implementation: 1975-1980.

    Ransome-Kuti O

    [Unpublished] 1988 May 21. 18 p. (NCIH 15th Annual International Health Conference; Papers)

    This address covers the 3 phases of National Primary Health Care (PHC) Implementation in Nigeria from 1975 to the present. The concept for the implementation of the 1st phase was to build and equip health centers, then train and post health workers to the facilities. No attempt was made to involve the community, use appropriate health technology, or set up management systems (such as referrals, supplies, monitoring, and evaluation of the delivery system). In short, at the end of the planned period, nowhere in the Federation were services, as described in the Alma Atta Declaration, being delivered. Between 1980 and 1985, because of the failure of the Basic Health Services Scheme, the Federal Ministry of Health abandoned any attempt to set up a PHC system and began the implementation of vertical systems of health care. Within the Ministry, groups attached themselves to particular agencies, leading to severe fragmentation of the Ministry. The Ministry as a whole had ceased to pursue the goals of PHC and adopted new objectives agreeable to each donor agency. Since 1985, the present Nigerian administration has aimed at establishing local government by local government, with the nation's PHC system incorporating the existing vertical programs. The considerable resources available through many AID agencies, international organizations, and governments need to be harnessed to achieve Nigeria's goals. Nigeria must therefore be clear as regards what these are and how to achieve them, bearing in mind that most of these agencies and organizations have their mandates and objectives limiting the activities in which they may engage.
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