Your search found 150 Results

  1. 1
    393677
    Peer Reviewed

    I beg you...breastfeed the baby, things changed: infant feeding experiences among Ugandan mothers living with HIV in the context of evolving guidelines to prevent postnatal transmission.

    Dunkley E; Ashaba S; Burns B; O'Neil K; Sanyu N; Akatukwasa C; Kastner J; Berry NS; Psaros C; Matthews LT; Kaida A

    BMC Public Health. 2018 Jan 29; 18(1):188.

    BACKGROUND: For women living with HIV (WLWH) in low- and middle-income countries, World Health Organization (WHO) infant feeding guidelines now recommend exclusive breastfeeding until six months followed by mixed feeding until 24 months, alongside lifelong maternal antiretroviral therapy (ART). These recommendations represent the sixth major revision to WHO infant feeding guidelines since 1992. We explored how WLWH in rural Uganda make infant feeding decisions in light of evolving recommendations. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 20 postpartum Ugandan WLWH accessing ART, who reported pregnancy < 2 years prior to recruitment. Interviews were conducted between February-August 2014 with babies born between March 2012-October 2013, over which time, the regional HIV treatment clinic recommended lifelong ART for all pregnant and breastfeeding women (Option B+). Content analysis was used to identify major themes. Infant feeding experiences was an emergent theme. NVivo 10 software was used to organize analyses. RESULTS: Among 20 women, median age was 33 years [IQR: 28-35], number of livebirths was 3 [IQR: 2-5], years on ART was 2.3 [IQR: 1.5-5.1], and 95% were virally suppressed. Data revealed that women valued opportunities to reduce postnatal transmission. However, women made infant feeding choices that differed from recommendations due to: (1) perception of conflicting recommendations regarding infant feeding; (2) fear of prolonged infant HIV exposure through breastfeeding; and (3) social and structural constraints shaping infant feeding decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: WLWH face layered challenges navigating evolving infant feeding recommendations. Further research is needed to examine guidance and decision-making on infant feeding choices to improve postpartum experiences and outcomes. Improved communication about changes to recommendations is needed for WLWH, their partners, community members, and healthcare providers.
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  2. 2
    393224

    Professional care delivery or traditional birth attendants? The impact of the type of care utilized by mothers on under-five mortality of their children.

    Muzyamba C; Groot W; Pavlova M; Rud I; Tomini SM

    Tropical Medicine and Health. 2018; 46(1)

    Background: Because of the high under-five mortality rate, the government in Zambia has adopted the World Health Organization (WHO) policy on child delivery which insists on professional maternal care. However, there are scholars who criticize this policy by arguing that although built on good intentions, the policy to ban traditional birth attendants (TBAs) is out of touch with local reality in Zambia. There is lack of evidence to legitimize either of the two positions, nor how the outcome differs between women with HIV and those without HIV. Thus, the aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of using professional maternal care or TBA care by mothers (during antenatal, delivery, and postnatal) on under-five mortality of their children. We also compare these outcomes between HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. Methods: By relying on data from the 2013-2014 Zambia Demographic Health Survey (ZDHS), we carried out propensity score matching (PSM) to investigate the effect of utilization of professional care or TBA during antenatal, childbirth, and postnatal on under-five mortality. This method allows us to estimate the average treatment effect on the treated (ATT). Results: Our results show that the use of professional care as opposed to TBAs in all three stages of maternal care increases the probability of children surviving beyond 5 years old. Specifically for women with HIV, professional care usage during antenatal, at birth, and during postnatal periods increases probability of survival by 0.07 percentage points (p.p), 0.71 p.p, and 0.87 p.p respectively. Similarly, for HIV-negative women, professional care usage during antenatal, at birth, and during postnatal periods increases probability of survival by 0.71 p.p, 0.52 p.p, and 0.37 p.p respectively. However, although there is a positive impact when mothers choose professional care over TBAs, the differences at all three points of maternal care are small. Conclusion: Given our findings, showing small differences in under-five child's mortality between utilizers of professional care and utilizers of TBAs, it may be questioned whether the government's intention of completely excluding TBAs (who despite being outlawed are still being used) without replacement by good quality professional care is the right decision. © 2018 The Author(s).
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  3. 3
    392854
    Peer Reviewed

    Uptake and predictors of early postnatal follow-up care amongst mother-baby pairs in South Africa: Results from three population-based surveys, 2010-2013.

    Larsen A; Cheyip M; Aynalem G; Dinh TH; Jackson D; Ngandu N; Chirinda W; Mogashoa M; Kindra G; Lombard C; Goga A

    Journal of Global Health. 2017 Dec; 7(2):021001.

    Background: Achieving World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for postnatal care (PNC) within the first few weeks of life is vital to eliminating early mother-to-child transmission of HIV (MTCT) and improving infant health. Almost half of the annual global deaths among children under five occur during the first six weeks of life. This study aims to identify uptake of three PNC visits within the first six weeks of life as recommended by WHO among South African mother-infant pairs, and factors associated with uptake. Methods: We analyzed data from three facility-based, nationally representative surveys (2010, 2011/12 and 2012/13) primarily designed to determine the effectiveness of the South African program to prevent MTCT. This analysis describes the proportion of infants achieving the WHO recommendation of at least 3 PNC visits. Interviews from 27 699 HIV-negative and HIV-positive mothers of infants aged 4-8 weeks receiving their six week immunization were included in analysis. Data were analyzed using STATA 13.0 and weighted for sample ascertainment and South African live births. We fitted a multivariable logistic regression model to estimate factors associated with early PNC uptake. Results: Over half (59.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 59.0-60.3) of mother-infant pairs received the recommended three PNC visits during the first 6 weeks; uptake was 63.1% (95% CI = 61.9-64.3) amongst HIV exposed infants and 58.1% (95% CI = 57.3-58.9) amongst HIV unexposed infants. Uptake of early PNC improved significantly with each survey, but varied significantly by province. Multivariable analysis of the pooled data, controlling for survey year, demonstrated that number of antenatal visits (4+ vs <4 Adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.04-1.23), timing of initial antenatal visits (12 weeks, aOR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.04-1.23), place of delivery (clinic vs hospital aOR = 1.5, 1.3-1.6), and infant HIV exposure (exposed vs unexposed aOR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.1-1.2) were the key factors associated with receiving recommended PNC visits. Conclusions: Approximately 40% of neonates did not receive three or more postnatal care visits in the first 6 weeks of life from 2010-2013. To improve uptake of early PNC, early antenatal booking, more frequent antenatal care attendance, and attention to HIV negative women is needed.
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  4. 4
    392585
    Peer Reviewed

    Measuring postnatal care contacts for mothers and newborns: An analysis of data from the MICS and DHS surveys.

    Amouzou A; Mehra V; Carvajal-Aguirre L; Khan SM; Sitrin D; Vaz LM

    Journal of Global Health. 2017 Dec; 7(2):020502.

    Background: The postnatal period represents a vulnerable phase for mothers and newborns where both face increased risk of morbidity and death. WHO recommends postnatal care (PNC) for mothers and newborns to include a first contact within 24 hours following the birth of the child. However, measuring coverage of PNC in household surveys has been variable over time. The two largest household survey programs in low and middle-income countries, the UNICEF-supported Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) and USAID-funded Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), now include modules that capture these measures. However, the measurement approach is slightly different between the two programs. We attempt to assess the possible measurement differences that might affect comparability of coverage measures. Methods: We first review the standard questionnaires of the two survey programs to compare approaches to collecting data on postnatal contacts for mothers and newborns. We then illustrate how the approaches used can affect PNC coverage estimates by analysing data from four countries; Bangladesh, Ghana, Kygyz Republic, and Nepal, with both MICS and DHS between 2010-2015. Results: We found that tools implemented todate by MICS and DHS (up to MICS round 5 and up to DHS phase 6) have collected PNC information in different ways. While MICS dedicated a full module to PNC and distinguishes immediate vs later PNC, DHS implemented a more blended module of pregnancy and postnatal and did not systematically distinguish those phases. The two survey programs differred in the way questions on postnatal care for mothers and newbors were framed. Subsequently, MICS and DHS surveys followed different methodological approach to compute the global indicator of postnatal contacts for mothers and newborns within two days following delivery. Regardless of the place of delivery, MICS estimates for postnatal contacts for mothers and newbors appeared consistently higher than those reported in DHS. The difference was however, far more pronounced in case of newborns. Conclusions: Difference in questionnaires and the methodology adopted to measure PNC have created comparability issues in the coverage levels. Harmonization of survey instruments on postnatal contacts will allow comparable and better assessment of coverage levels and trends.
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  5. 5
    392583
    Peer Reviewed

    Does postnatal care have a role in improving newborn feeding? A study in 15 sub-Saharan African countries.

    Khan SM; Speizer IS; Singh K; Angeles G; Twum-Danso NA; Barker P

    Journal of Global Health. 2017 Dec; 7(2):020506.

    Background: Breastfeeding is known as a key intervention to improve newborn health and survival while prelacteal feeds (liquids other than breastmilk within 3 days of birth) represents a departure from optimal feeding practices. Recent programmatic guidelines from the WHO and UNICEF outline the need to improve newborn feeding and points to postnatal care (PNC) as a potential mechanism to do so. This study examines if PNC and type of PNC provider are associated with key newborn feeding practices: breastfeeding within 1 day and prelacteal feeds. Methods: We use data from the Demographic and Health Surveys for 15 sub-Saharan African countries to estimate 4 separate pooled, multilevel, logistic regression models to predict the newborn feeding outcomes. Findings: PNC is significantly associated with increased breastfeeding within 1day (OR = 1.35, P < 0.001) but is not associated with PLFs (OR = 1.04, P = 0.195). PNC provided by nurses, midwives and untrained health workers is also associated with higher odds of breastfeeding within 1 day of birth (OR = 1.39, P < 0.001, (OR = 1.95, P < 0.001) while PNC provided by untrained health workers is associated with increased odds of PLFs (OR = 1.20, P = 0.017). Conclusions: PNC delivered through customary care may be an effective strategy to improve the breastfeeding within 1 day but not to discourage PLFs. Further analysis should be done to examine how these variables operate at the country level to produce finer programmatic insight.
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  6. 6
    391434

    Quality of care in women's, children's, and adolescent health. Methods for assessing evaluation and implementation in West Africa. Experience in the Cote d'Ivoire. Qualite des soins en SMNI. Methodologie de l'evaluation et mise en pratique en Afrique de l'Ouest. A propos de l'experience de la Cote d'Ivoire.

    Guie YP; Cisse L; Saki-Nekouressi G; Bucagu M; Landrivon G; Agbodjan-Prince O

    Medecine et Sante Tropicales. 2016 Nov 1; 26(4):357-362.

    A tool developed by WHO was used to assess the quality of care for mothers, newborns, and children in some healthcare facilities in French-speaking Africa; this study led to the development of recommendations for the implementation of actions intended to resolve the problems observed and to optimize patient management. We report here the experience of the maternity units of the university hospital center of Treichville, in Abidjan, discuss the presentation of the results of the assessment, and make some recommendations as part of an action program. The experience of the monthly review of referred cases is also reported.
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  7. 7
    377434

    Validation of maternal and neonatal tetanus elimination in Equatorial Guinea, 2016. alidation de l'elimination du tetanos maternel et neonatal en Guinee equatoriale, 2016.

    Releve Epidemiologique Hebdomadaire. 2017 Jun 16; 92(24):333-44.

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  8. 8
    379137
    Peer Reviewed

    Uptake and performance of prevention of mother-to-child transmission and early infant diagnosis in pregnant HIV infected women and their exposed infants at seven health centres in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Girma M; Wendaferash R; Shibru H; Berhane Y; Hoelscheer M

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2017 Jun; 22(6):765-775.

    Objective To assess the uptake of WHO-recommended PMTCT procedures in Ethiopia's health services. Methods Prospective observational study of HIV-positive pregnant mothers and their newborns attending PMTCT services at seven health centers in Addis Ababa. Women were recruited during antenatal care and followed-up with their newborns at delivery, day 6 and week 6 postpartum. Retention to PMCTC procedures, self-reported ART adherence, and HIV infant outcome were assessed. Turnaround times of HIV early infant diagnosis (EID) procedures were extracted from health registers. Results Of 494 women enrolled 4.9% did not complete PMTCT procedures due to active denial or loss to follow-up. HIV was first diagnosed in 223 (45.1%) and ART initiated in 321 (65.0%) women during pregnancy. ART was initiated in a median of 1.3 weeks (IQR 0-4.3) after HIV diagnosis. Poor self-reported treatment adherence was higher post-partum than during pregnancy (12.5% versus 7.0%, p=0.002), and significantly associated with divorced/separated marital status (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.3-3.8), low family income (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.1), low CD4-count (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-3.0), and ART initiation during delivery (RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.6). Of 435 infants born alive 98.6% received nevirapine prophylaxis. The mother-to-child HIV transmission rate was 0.7% after a median of 6.7 weeks (IQR 6.4-10.4), but EID results were received for only 46.6% within 3 months of birth. Conclusion High retention in PMTCT services, triple maternal ART and high infant nevirapine prophylaxis coverage were associated with low mother-to-child HIV transmission. Declining post-partum ART adherence and challenges of EID linkage require attention.
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  9. 9
    379132
    Peer Reviewed

    Option B+ for prevention of vertical HIV transmission has no influence on adverse birth outcomes in a cross-sectional cohort in Western Uganda.

    Rempis EM; Schnack A; Decker S; Braun V; Rubaihayo J

    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2017 Mar 7; 17(82):1-12.

    Background While most Sub-Saharan African countries are now implementing the WHO-recommended Option B+ protocol for prevention of vertical HIV transmission, there is a lack of knowledge regarding the influence of Option B+ exposure on adverse birth outcomes (ABOs). Against this background, we assessed ABOs among delivering women in Western Uganda. Methods A cross-sectional, observational study was performed within a cohort of 412 mother-newborn-pairs in Virika Hospital, Fort Portal in 2013. The occurrence of stillbirth, pre-term delivery, and small size for gestational age (SGA) was analyzed, looking for influencing factors related to HIV-status, antiretroviral drug exposure and duration, and other sociodemographic and clinical parameters. Results Among 302 HIV-negative and 110 HIV-positive women, ABOs occurred in 40.5%, with stillbirth in 6.3%, pre-term delivery in 28.6%, and SGA in 12.2% of deliveries. For Option B+ intake (n = 59), no significant association was found with stillbirth (OR 0.48, p = 0.55), pre-term delivery (OR 0.97, p = 0.92) and SGA (OR 1.5, p = 0.3) compared to seronegative women. Women enrolled on antiretroviral therapy (ART) before conception (n = 38) had no different risk for ABOs than women on Option B+ or HIV-negative women. Identified risk factors for stillbirth included lack of formal education, poor socio-economic status, long travel distance, hypertension and anemia. Pre-term delivery risk was increased with poor socio-economic status, primiparity, Malaria and anemia. The occurrence of SGA was influenced by older age and Malaria. Conclusion In our study, women on Option B+ showed no difference in ABOs compared to HIV-negative women and to women on ART. We identified several non-HIV/ART-related influencing factors, suggesting an urgent need for improving early risk assessment mechanisms in antenatal care through better screening and triage systems. Our results are encouraging with regard to continued universal scale-up of Option B+ and ART programs.
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  10. 10
    378627
    Peer Reviewed

    Breastmilk Output in a Disadvantaged Community with High HIV Prevalence as Determined by the Deuterium Oxide Dose-to-Mother Technique.

    Mulol H; Coutsoudis A

    Breastfeeding Medicine. 2016 Mar; 11(2):64-9.

    INTRODUCTION: World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines for HIV-infected mothers are exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and then continued breastfeeding for 12 months, provided the mother is receiving antiretroviral prophylaxis. Many African women perceive that breastmilk alone is not sufficient for their infant's nutritional requirements for the first 6 months of life, and mixed feeding is a common practice. METHODOLOGY: A stable isotope technique was used to determine breastmilk output volumes and maternal body composition objectively at five different time points in the first year of the infant's life. RESULTS: Breastmilk output volumes were high for HIV-infected mothers: 831 +/- 185 g/day at 6 weeks; 899 +/- 188 g/day at 3 months; 871 +/- 293 g/day at 6 months; 679 +/- 281 g/day at 9 months; and 755 +/- 287 g/day at 12 months. These high output volumes had no negative impact on the mother's fat-free mass. The breastmilk output volumes for HIV-uninfected mothers were not significantly different to the outputs for HIV-infected mothers at any of the time points (p > 0.05): 948 +/- 223 g/day at 6 weeks; 925 +/- 227 g/day at 3 months; 902 +/- 286 g/day at 6 months; 746 +/- 263 g/day at 9 months; and 713 +/- 264 g/day at 12 months. CONCLUSION: This study using objective methodology shows that breastmilk outputs of HIV-infected mothers were relatively high (and within published reference ranges), and mothers are able to provide sufficient breastmilk for their infants without compromising their own fat-free mass.
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  11. 11
    375271

    State of inequality: Childhood immunization.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 96 p.

    The report addresses two overarching questions: What inequalities in childhood immunization coverage exist in low- and middle-income countries? And how have childhood immunization inequalities changed over the last 10 years? In answering these questions, this report draws on data about five childhood immunization indicators, disaggregated by four dimensions of inequality, and covering 69 countries. The findings of this report indicate that there is less inequality now than 10 years ago. Global improvements have been realized with variable patterns of change across countries and by indicator and dimension of inequality. The current situation in many countries shows that further improvement is needed to lessen inequalities; in particular, inequalities related to household economic status and mother’s education were the most prominent. (Excerpt)
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  12. 12
    340407

    Guideline: Updates on HIV and infant feeding. The duration of breastfeeding and support from health services to improve feeding practices among mothers living with HIV.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [68] p.

    The objective of this guideline is to improve the HIV-free survival of HIV-exposed infants by providing guidance on appropriate infant feeding practices and use of ARV drugs for mothers living with HIV and by updating WHO-related tools and training materials. The guideline is intended mainly for countries with high HIV prevalence and settings in which diarrhoea, pneumonia and undernutrition are common causes of infant and child mortality. However, it may also be relevant to settings with a low prevalence of HIV depending on the background rates and causes of infant and child mortality. This guideline aims to help Member States and their partners in their efforts to make informed decisions on the appropriate nutrition actions to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, the global targets set in the comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition, the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health (2016-2030) and the Global Health Sector Strategy on Sexually Transmitted Infections 2016-2021. The target audience for this guideline includes: (1) national policy-makers in health ministries; (2) programme managers working in child health, essential drugs and health worker training; (3) health-care providers, researchers and clinicians providing services to pregnant women and mothers living with HIV at various levels of health care; and (4) development partners providing financial and/or technical support for child health programmes, including those in conflict and emergency settings. (Excerpt)
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  13. 13
    371987

    The effectiveness of the WHO training course on complementary feeding counseling in a primary care setting, Ismailia, Egypt.

    El-Sayed H; Martines J; Rakha M; Zekry O; Abdel-Hak M; Abbas H

    Journal of the Egyptian Public Health Association. 2014 Apr; 89(1):1-8.

    BACKGROUND: The adequacy and timing of complementary feeding of the breastfed child are critical for optimal child growth and development.Considerable efforts have been made to improve complementary feeding in the first 2 years of life. One of them was the WHO complementary feeding counseling course (CFC). OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of the WHO CFC on knowledge and counseling abilities of primary healthcare physicians; on caretaker's knowledge and adherence to physicians' recommendations and their feeding practices; and on children's growth. PARTICIPANTS AND INTERVENTIONS: A single-blinded randomized-controlled study was carried out in 40 primary healthcare centers divided into matched pairs according to their location, either in rural or urban areas, and training of the selected physicians on integrated management of childhood illness. One center from each pair was selected randomly for its physician to receive CFC training in nutrition counseling and the matched center was selected as a control. Forty primary healthcare center physicians and 480 mother-child (6-18 months) pairs were included in the study. The mother-child pairs recruited were visited at home within 2 weeks, 90, and 180 days after the initial consultation with trained health workers. Special questionnaires were used to collect information on healthcare providers' knowledge of nutrition counseling and practice (counseling skills); maternal knowledge of basic nutrition-counseling recommendations, maternal compliance with the recommended feeding practice; child dietary intake; and gains in weight and length. RESULTS: CFC-trained physicians were more likely to engage in nutrition counseling and to deliver more appropriate advice. This was reflected in improvements in maternal recall of complementary feeding messages, which were higher in the intervention group compared with the control group. Six months after the consultation, children in the intervention group had significantly greater weight gains compared with the control group (0.96 vs. 0.78 kg; P=0.038). Children in the intervention group, who were 12-18 months of age at the time of recruitment, had significantly less faltering in length gain compared with the control group (height/age Z-score; 0.23 vs. 0.04; P=0.004). CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Nutrition counseling training improved counseling abilities of primary healthcare physicians and led to improvements in mothers' knowledge and practices of complementary feeding. In turn, this led to improved growth of children. We recommend wide and regular utilization of the CFC course to improve the knowledge and skills of health workers who provide counseling to mothers for complementary feeding.
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  14. 14
    337913

    Guideline: Delayed umbilical cord clamping for improved maternal and infant health and nutrition outcomes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [38] p.

    This guideline is a derivative product from existing World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations on umbilical cord clamping for improving maternal and infant outcomes. The optimal timing of umbilical cord clamping has been debated in the scientific literature for at least a century, and the timing of cord clamping continues to vary according to clinical policy and practice. “Early” cord clamping is generally carried out in the first 60 seconds after birth (most commonly in the first 15-30 seconds), whereas “delayed” (also referred to as “late”) cord clamping is generally carried out more than 1 min after the birth or when the umbilical cord pulsation has ceased. For the mother, delayed cord clamping is one of the actions included in a package for reduction of the risk of postpartum haemorrhage. Member States have requested guidance from WHO on the effects of delayed cord clamping for improving maternal and infant nutrition and health, as a public health strategy in support of their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, in particular, reduction of child mortality (MDG 4) and improvement of maternal health (MDG 5), as well as the global targets set in the Comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition. The guideline is intended for a wide audience, including policy-makers; their expert advisers; technical and programme staff at organizations involved in the design, implementation and scaling-up of nutrition actions for public health; and health staff providing care to mothers and their infants. (Excerpt)
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  15. 15
    382783
    Peer Reviewed

    Individualizing the WHO HIV and infant feeding guidelines: optimal breastfeeding duration to maximize infant HIV-free survival.

    Ciaranello AL; Leroy V; Rusibamayila A; Freedberg KA; Shapiro R; Engelsmann B; Lockman S; Kelly KA; Dabis F; Walensky RP

    AIDS. 2014 Jul; 28 Suppl 3:S287-99.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine how infant feeding recommendations can maximize HIV-free survival (HFS) among HIV-exposed, uninfected African infants, balancing risks of breast milk-associated HIV infection with setting-specific risks of illness and death associated with replacement feeding. DESIGN: Validated mathematical model of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants, with published data from Africa. METHODS: We projected 24-month HFS using combinations of: maternal CD4, antiretroviral drug availability, and relative risk of mortality among replacement-fed compared to breastfed infants ('RR-RF', range 1.0-6.0). For each combination, we identified the 'optimal' breastfeeding duration (0-24 months) maximizing HFS. We compared HFS under an 'individualized' approach, based on the above parameters, to the WHO 'public health approach' (12 months breastfeeding for all HIV-infected women). RESULTS: Projected HFS was 65-93%. When the value of RR-RF is 1.0, replacement feeding from birth maximized HFS. At a commonly reported RR-RF value (2.0), optimal breastfeeding duration was 3-12 months, depending on maternal CD4 and antiretroviral drug availability. As the value of RR-RF increased, optimal breastfeeding duration increased. Compared to the public health approach, an individualized approach improved absolute HFS by less than 1% if RR-RF value was 2.0-4.0, by 3% if RR-RF value was 1.0 or 6.0, and by greater amounts if access to antiretroviral drugs was limited. CONCLUSION: Tailoring breastfeeding duration to maternal CD4, antiretroviral drug availability, and local replacement feeding safety can optimize HFS among HIV-exposed infants. An individualized approach leads to moderate gains in HFS, but only when mortality risks from replacement feeding are very low or very high, or antiretroviral drug availability is limited. The WHO public health approach is beneficial in most resource-limited settings.
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  16. 16
    336019
    Peer Reviewed

    Barriers to implementing WHO's exclusive breastfeeding policy for women living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: an exploration of ideas, interests and institutions.

    Eamer GG; Randall GE

    International Journal of Health Planning and Management. 2013 Jul-Sep; 28(3):257-68.

    The vertical transmission of HIV occurs when an HIV-positive woman passes the virus to her baby during pregnancy, delivery or breastfeeding. The World Health Organization's (WHO) Guidelines on HIV and infant feeding 2010 recommends exclusive breastfeeding for HIV-positive mothers in resource-limited settings. Although evidence shows that following this strategy will dramatically reduce vertical transmission of HIV, full implementation of the WHO Guidelines has been severely limited in sub-Saharan Africa. This paper provides an analysis of the role of ideas, interests and institutions in establishing barriers to the effective implementation of these guidelines by reviewing efforts to implement prevention of vertical transmission programs in various sub-Saharan countries. Findings suggest that WHO Guidelines on preventing vertical transmission of HIV through exclusive breastfeeding in resource-limited settings are not being translated into action by governments and front-line workers because of a variety of structural and ideological barriers. Identifying and understanding the role played by ideas, interests and institutions is essential to overcoming barriers to guideline implementation. Copyright (c) 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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  17. 17
    365577
    Peer Reviewed

    Pregnancy and childbirth outcomes among adolescent mothers: a World Health Organization multicountry study.

    Ganchimeg T; Ota E; Morisaki N; Laopaiboon M; Lumbiganon P; Zhang J; Yamdamsuren B; Temmerman M; Say L; Tuncalp O; Vogel JP; Souza JP; Mori R

    BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2014 Mar; 121 Suppl 1:40-8.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes among adolescents in 29 countries. DESIGN: Secondary analysis using facility-based cross-sectional data of the World Health Organization Multicountry Survey on Maternal and Newborn Health. SETTING: Twenty-nine countries in Africa, Latin America, Asia and the Middle East. POPULATION: Women admitted for delivery in 359 health facilities during 2-4 months between 2010 and 2011. METHODS: Multilevel logistic regression models were used to estimate the association between young maternal age and adverse pregnancy outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes among adolescent mothers. RESULTS: A total of 124 446 mothers aged
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  18. 18
    351750
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO 2010 guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Zimbabwe: modeling clinical outcomes in infants and mothers.

    Ciaranello AL; Perez F; Maruva M; Chu J; Engelsmann B; Keatinge J; Walensky RP; Mushavi A; Mugwagwa R; Dabis F; Freedberg KA

    PloS One. 2011; 6(6):e20224.

    BACKGROUND: The Zimbabwean national prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) program provided primarily single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP) from 2002-2009 and is currently replacing sdNVP with more effective antiretroviral (ARV) regimens. METHODS: Published HIV and PMTCT models, with local trial and programmatic data, were used to simulate a cohort of HIV-infected, pregnant/breastfeeding women in Zimbabwe (mean age 24.0 years, mean CD4 451 cells/microL). We compared five PMTCT regimens at a fixed level of PMTCT medication uptake: 1) no antenatal ARVs (comparator); 2) sdNVP; 3) WHO 2010 guidelines using "Option A" (zidovudine during pregnancy/infant NVP during breastfeeding for women without advanced HIV disease; lifelong 3-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART) for women with advanced disease); 4) WHO "Option B" (ART during pregnancy/breastfeeding without advanced disease; lifelong ART with advanced disease); and 5) "Option B+:" lifelong ART for all pregnant/breastfeeding, HIV-infected women. Pediatric (4-6 week and 18-month infection risk, 2-year survival) and maternal (2- and 5-year survival, life expectancy from delivery) outcomes were projected. RESULTS: Eighteen-month pediatric infection risks ranged from 25.8% (no antenatal ARVs) to 10.9% (Options B/B+). Although maternal short-term outcomes (2- and 5-year survival) varied only slightly by regimen, maternal life expectancy was reduced after receipt of sdNVP (13.8 years) or Option B (13.9 years) compared to no antenatal ARVs (14.0 years), Option A (14.0 years), or Option B+ (14.5 years). CONCLUSIONS: Replacement of sdNVP with currently recommended regimens for PMTCT (WHO Options A, B, or B+) is necessary to reduce infant HIV infection risk in Zimbabwe. The planned transition to Option A may also improve both pediatric and maternal outcomes.
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  19. 19
    351167
    Peer Reviewed

    Implications of the new WHO guidelines on HIV and infant feeding for child survival in South Africa.

    Doherty T; Sanders D; Goga A; Jackson D

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2011 Jan 1; 89(1):62-7.

    The World Health Organization released revised principles and recommendations for HIV and infant feeding in November 2009. The recommendations are based on programmatic evidence and research studies that have accumulated over the past few years within African countries. This document urges national or subnational health authorities to decide whether health services should mainly counsel and support HIV-infected mothers to breastfeed and receive antiretroviral interventions, or to avoid all breastfeeding, based on estimations of which strategy is likely to give infants in those communities the greatest chance of HIV-free survival. South Africa has recently revised its clinical guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission, adopting many of the recommendations in the November 2009 World Health Organization's rapid advice on use of antiretroviral drugs for treating pregnant women and preventing HIV infection in infants. However, one aspect of the new South African guidelines gives cause for concern: the continued provision of free formula milk to HIV-infected women through public health facilities. This paper presents the latest evidence regarding mortality and morbidity associated with feeding practices in the context of HIV and suggests a modification of current policy to prioritize child survival for all South African children.
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  20. 20
    350915
    Peer Reviewed

    Effects of the World Bank's maternal and child health intervention on Indonesia's poor: evaluating the safe motherhood project.

    Baird J; Ma S; Ruger JP

    Social Science and Medicine. 2011 Jun; 72(12):1948-55.

    This article examines the impact of the World Bank's Safe Motherhood Project (SMP) on health outcomes for Indonesia's poor. Provincial data from 1990 to 2005 was analyzed combining a difference-in-differences approach in multivariate regression analysis with matching of intervention (SMP) and control group provinces and adjusting for possible confounders. Our results indicated that, after taking into account the impact of two other concurrent development projects, SMP was statistically significantly associated with a net beneficial change in under-five mortality, but not with infant mortality, total fertility rate, teenage pregnancy, unmet contraceptive need or percentage of deliveries overseen by trained health personnel. Unemployment and the pupil-teacher ratio were statistically significantly associated with infant mortality and percentage deliveries overseen by trained personnel, while pupil-teacher ratio and female education level were statistically significantly associated with under-five mortality. Clinically relevant changes (52-68% increase in the percentage of deliveries overseen by trained personnel, 25-33% decrease in infant mortality rate, and 8-14% decrease in under-five mortality rate) were found in both the intervention (SMP) and control groups. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  21. 21
    342429
    Peer Reviewed

    Antiretroviral resistance patterns and HIV-1 subtype in mother-infant pairs after the administration of combination short-course zidovudine plus single-dose nevirapine for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    Chalermchockcharoenkit A; Culnane M; Chotpitayasunondh T; Vanprapa N; Leelawiwat W; Mock PA; Asavapiriyanont S; Teeraratkul A; McConnell MS; McNicholl JM; Tappero JW

    Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2009 Jul 15; 49(2):299-305.

    BACKGROUND: World Health Organization guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recommend administration of zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine (NVP) for HIV-1-infected women who are not receiving treatment for their own health or if complex regimens are not available. This study assessed antiretroviral resistance patterns among HIV-infected women and infants receiving single-dose NVP in Thailand, where the predominant circulating HIV-1 strains are CRF01_AE recombinants and where the minority are subtype B. METHODS: Venous blood samples were obtained from (1) HIV-infected women who received zidovudine from 34 weeks' gestation and single-dose NVP plus oral zidovudine during labor and (2) HIV-infected infants who received single-dose NVP after birth plus zidovudine for 4 weeks after delivery. HIV-1 drug resistance testing was performed using the TruGene assay (Bayer HealthCare). RESULTS: Most mothers and infants were infected with CRF01_AE. NVP resistance was detected in 34 (18%) of 190 women and 2 (20%) of 10 infants. There was a significantly higher proportion of NVP mutations in women with delivery viral loads of >50,000 copies/mL (adjusted odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-32.8, [Formula: see text] for linear trend) and in those with subtype B rather than CRF01_AE infections (38% vs. 16%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-11.8; P = .038). CONCLUSIONS: The lower frequency of NVP mutations among mothers infected with subtype CRF01_AE, compared with mothers infected with subtype B, suggests that individuals infected with subtype CRF01_AE may be less susceptible to the induction of NVP resistance than are individuals infected with subtype B.
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  22. 22
    340233

    Effect of WHO Newborn Care Training on neonatal mortality by education.

    Chomba E; McClure EM; Wright LL; Carlo WA; Chakraborty H

    Ambulatory Pediatrics. 2008 Sep-Oct; 8(5):300-304.

    Background.-Ninety-nine percent of the 4 million neonatal deaths per year occur in developing countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) Essential Newborn Care (ENC) course sets the minimum accepted standard for training midwives on aspects of infant care (neonatal resuscitation, breastfeeding, kangaroo care, small baby care, and thermoregulation), many of which are provided by the mother. Objective.-The aim of this study was to determine the association of ENC with all-cause 7-day (early) neonatal mortality among infants of less educated mothers compared with those of mothers with more education. Methods.-Protocol- and ENC-certified research nurses trained all 123 college-educated midwives from 18 low-risk, first-level urban community health centers (Zambia) in data collection (1 week) and ENC (1 week) as part of a controlled study to test the clinical impact of ENC implementation. The mothers were categorized into 2 groups, those who had completed 7 years of school education (primary education) and those with 8 or more years of education. Results.-ENC training is associated with decreases in early neonatal mortality; rates decreased from 11.2 per 1000 live births pre- ENC to 6.2 per 1000 following ENC implementation (P <.001). Prenatal care, birth weight, race, and gender did not differ between the groups. Mortality for infants of mothers with 7 years of education decreased from 12.4 to 6.0 per 1000 (P < .0001) but did not change significantly for those with 8 or more years of education (8.7 to 6.3 per 1000, P ¼.14). Conclusions.-ENC training decreases early neonatal mortality, and the impact is larger in infants of mothers without secondary education. The impact of ENC may be optimized by training health care workers who treat women with less formal education.
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  23. 23
    329087

    Guidance on infant feeding and HIV in the context of refugees and displaced populations.

    Lhotska L; McGrath M

    Geneva, Switzerland, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR], 2008 Apr. 20 p.

    This Guidance on Infant feeding and HIV aims to assist UNHCR, its implementing and operational partners, and governments on policies and decision- making strategies on infant feeding and HIV in refugees and displaced populations. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the current technical and programmatic consensus on infant feeding and HIV, and give guidance to facilitate elective implementation of HIV and infant feeding programmes in refugee and displaced situations, in emergency contexts, and as an integral element of coordinated approach to public health, HIV and nutrition programming. The goal of this guidance is to provide tools to prevent malnutrition, improve the nutritional status of infants and young children, to reduce the transmission of HIV infection from mother to child after delivery, and to increase HIV-free survival of infants.
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  24. 24
    325498

    Prevention of HIV infection in infants: Documenting and learning from the Ukraine experience.

    Thorne C; Newell ML; Zhylka N

    Kyiv, Ukraine, UNICEF, 2007. 100 p.

    The aim of this review is to document the experience of PMTCT in Ukraine to date, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of lessons learned within the current PMTCT programme. The report is structured around the four pillars of PMTCT: primary prevention of HIV infection within the context of MTCT; prevention of unintended pregnancies among HIV positive women; prevention of transmission from HIV positive women to their child; providing care and support to HIV positive women, their infants and their family. Since the initiation of the first national PMTCT programme in Ukraine in 2001, Ukraine has made substantial progress towards prevention of HIV infection in infants. Evaluation of the first programme in 2003 by a national and international team, including WHO and UNICEF, allowed consolidation of effort and the development of the next phase of the PMTCT programme. Furthermore, the findings facilitated the development of 'The Strategic Framework for the Prevention of HIV Infection in Infants in Europe' (2004). This outlined strategies for the implementation of the prevention of HIV infection in infants at a national level, with the aim of achieving the Dublin Declaration PMTCT goals. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    325099
    Peer Reviewed

    HIV, infant feeding and more perils for poor people: New WHO guidelines encourage review of formula milk policies.

    Coutsoudis A; Coovadia HM; Wilfert CM

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2008 Mar; 86(3):210-214.

    The release of the new WHO guidelines on HIV and infant feeding, in a global context of widespread impoverishment, requires countries to re-examine their infant-feeding policies in relation to broader socioeconomic issues. This widening scope is necessitated by compelling new reports on the scale of global underdevelopment in developing countries. This paper explores these issues by addressing feeding choices made by HIV-infected mothers and programmes supplying free formula milks within a global environment of persistent poverty. Accumulating evidence on the increase in malnutrition, morbidity and mortality associated with the avoidance or early cessation of breastfeeding by HIV-infected mothers, and the unanticipated hazards of formula feeding, demand a deeper assessment of the measures necessary for optimum policies on infant and child nutrition and for the amelioration of poverty. Piecemeal interventions that increase resources directed at only a fraction of a family's impoverishment, such as basic materials for preparation of hygienic formula feeds and making flawed decisions on choice of infant feeding, are bound to fail. These are not alternatives to taking fundamental steps to alleviate poverty. The economic opportunity costs of such programmes, the equity costs of providing resources to some and not others, and the leakages due to temptation to sell capital goods require careful evaluation. Providing formula to poor populations with high HIV prevalence cannot be justified by the evidence, by humanitarian considerations, by respect for local traditions or by economic outcomes. Exclusive breastfeeding, which is threatened by the HIV epidemic, remains an unfailing anchor of child survival (author's)
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